Broersen & Lukács

Point Cloud Old Growth
Forest on Location
In the video work Forest on Location, we see the avatar of the Iranian opera singer Shahram Yazdani walking through a forest. One moment, the forest wraps around him protectively, the next moment the trees crumble away into loose pieces of bark, or melt into a static green mass. At the same time, the forest as a whole floats around in darkness, uprooted. It is a forest without a location, except on our screen. The young man’s avatar appears to be wandering around there aimlessly. It is a wonderland that he exits from towards the end of the video, when his body slips straight through the green wall. This finally breaks the spell of the illusory forest, and everything is revealed to be no more than staged decor. But the forest does exist as a real forest, somewhere. This virtual green world is a digital back-up of Bia?owie?a Forest: the last remaining stretch of primeval low land forest that once covered much of Central Europe. Inspired by what the historian Simon Schama wrote about Bia?owie?a in Landscape and Memory (1995), Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács journeyed to Poland to capture the forest suffused by old-Germanic nostalgia and mythical atmosphere.

Stefan Tiefengraber

your unerasable text
“your unerasable text” is an interactive installation, dealing with the topics of data storage and elimination of data. The installation can be placed in an exhibition, but ideally it’s exhibited in a public space window, where it can be used by people passing by 24h a day. The participant is asked to send a textmessage to the number written on a sign next to the installation. “send your unerasable textmessage to +43 664 1788374”. The receiver mobile transfers it to a computer, which is layouting the message automatically. Then it is printed on to a DIN A6 paper, which is falling directly on to a papershredder. There the message remains readable for a few moments and gets destroyed then. The shredded paper forms a visible heap on the floor, which reminds of a generative graphic.

Michael Najjar

Terraforming
The video work “terraforming” focusses on the transformation of a natural environment through energy input. The underpinning idea is that of three phase system change. This begins with the stage of equilibrium where a system is in a certain balance and not changing at all. In the next stage an evolving system enters a state of motion and change where it moves away from equilibrium. The third and final stage is the phase of transformation in which the original system becomes something else. The key element in this transformation process is the sun. This process is called terraforming, whereby a hostile environment, i.e. a planet that is too cold, too hot, or has an unbreathable atmosphere, can be altered to make it suitable for human life. Such a process is not merely a futuristic scenario but represents exactly what is happening on Earth at this moment as the process of atmospheric change brought about by increasing CO2 emissions heats up our planet and speeds up the process of climate change.
video

United Visual Artists

ユナイテッド·ビジュアルアーティスト
美国视觉艺术家
our time

Our Time (2016) is the latest large-scale installation by United Visual Artists investigating our subjective experience of the passing of time. How long is a moment? At what rate does time actually pass? The work joins a series of kinetic sculptures that began with Momentum (2013); an installation designed as a ‘spatial instrument’ that was to reveal the relationship between expectation and perception when intersected with a physical space.
Our Time defines a physical environment where pendulums swing at a pace apparently unhindered by the laws of nature and where no single time measurement applies. The installation combines movement, light and sound as a multi-sensory, multi-dimensional canvas the visitor can enter. Pendulums swing, each to their own rhythm, as time flows through the grid. With light tracing the path and sound its echo, the passing of time becomes almost palpable.

Balazs Kicsiny

Winterreise
Captured moments are central in Kicsiny’s installations. His characters are simultaneously frozen still and in motion. In some works this paradox becomes literal, as in the installation Winterreise that depicts two priests skiing in different directions using the same skis, which makes forward motion impossible. The figures seem lost, isolated and their journey endless. In their hands they hold Jacob’s staffs, navigational instruments used in the 17th century. The work alludes to the continuous search for one’s place in life.

Aranda/Lasch

1774
In the year 1774 Louis XV died, marking the sunset of one of history’s most lavish monarchies. In the same year a young Swede named Johann Gahn, working in the deepest and wettest levels of a mine, discovered the metal Manganese. At a molecular level, when combined with oxides, manganese displays a striking “super-crystal” modularity. In this solid aluminum chair, two historic events—the super-excess of Louis XV and the super-crystal of Manganese—are fused into a single moment of design

Jonathan Monk

All The Possible Combinations Of Eight Legs Kicking
Intégrant mouvement, performance et imagerie, l’exposition explore les idées derrière le temps et la séquence, tandis que Monk interroge subtilement la compréhension du spectateur du passage du temps. Avec “Toutes les combinaisons possibles de coups de pied de huit jambes (une à la fois)” (2012-2013), Monk démontre la contrast entre la réalité clinique du temps et notre réaction spontanée. L’œuvre est une représentation littérale de son titre – car les jambes ont été programmées pour donner un coup de pied dans toutes les séquences possibles, soit un total de 40320 séquences différentes qui prennent plus de 177 heures à terminer. Contrairement à cette démonstration objective, le geste de donner des coups de pied est assez explosif, imitant les mouvements d’un danseur de cancan, et c’est cette explosion d’émotion qui met en évidence le suspense qui existe tout au long de l’œuvre. Alors que le spectateur est conscient que les jambes sont spécifiquement programmées pour donner un coup de pied à un moment précis, l’heure précise à laquelle cet événement se produit n’est pas donnée, créant une sorte de jeu de devinettes où le spectateur tente de prédire quand chaque coup de pied se produira, à chaque fois. individu ayant sa propre idée du moment où cela se produira.