Ronald van der Meijs

Odoshi Cloud Sequence
A symbiosis between nature and culture is created against the backdrop of the Japanese garden in the pond of the Amstelpark. This artwork explores new possibilities to generate sound and composition that are controlled by slow, unpredictable and unexpected elements of nature which are highly respected in Japanese culture. The diversity of natural sounds gives the work an almost meditative character, while the dependance on natural factors evoke a tension between longing and acceptance. This sound installation engages, as a natural sequencer, in a dialogue with the water, sun wind and clouds. It refers to Japanese garden culture by using the principle of the Japanese bamboo water tumbler.

Isabella Münnich

Immersed Garden
Immersed Garden is in its true sense a sunken world. Floating bodiless in an underwater garden, natural sounds guide you through an immersive surrounding, somewhere between calming and irritating, natural and artificial. It is a playful exploration of the individual conception of safety and confusion and a personal approach to aesthetic references to habits of introspection and retreat in digital environments. It was created by fusing different digital processes like photogrammetry of selected natural places around Karlsruhe and field recordings in a local natural reserve. Underwater videos hybridize with 3D scans of trees and plants while invisible frogs are croaking and humming birds are buzzing by synthetic flowers. The artistic aim was to explore the personal perception of calming and irritating, playing with the concept of immaterialness and attentiveness. The artwork creates aesthetic references to philosophical and scientific theories of introspection and identity.

The Great Animal Orchestra

Bernie Krause

Bernie Krause is one of the world’s experts in natural sound, and here we listen through Krause’s ears as he collects the sounds of purring jaguars, snapping shrimp, cracking glaciers–and the roar of the wild. It is an intensely personal narrative of life as it hits the ears, and of the planet‘s deeply connected natural sounds and music.

Azuma Makoto

Encapsulated environmental system: Paludarium YASUTOSHI
This machine is fully equipped with a mist machine as if wrapping plants in a fog from both sides and drip feed-water system which can be activated depending on the situation in order to maintain the condition of a plant and control inside temperature and humidity. Also the cylindrical shape can fully capture the natural light by 365°angles from glasses, and it can correspond to plant growth by having the series’ largest scale of height. Fans on the ceiling play a role of wind, and a plant can listen music from the waterproofed speakers. The machine takes in essential elements – rain, wind, light and sound – by artificial means and completes a small world where its ecological cycle is condensed. It enables us to admire the beauty of the plants by not being affected by external environment.

Jelle Mastenbroek

The Robin Who Wondered If He Was a Nightingale
Various members of orchestra perform impressive improvisations based on your identity and the natural environment. The flutes combine their sounds with the rhythm of the percussion. The special acoustics of the forest played an important role. Every time an attempt is made to deliver the highest quality of improvisation and to achieve more than perfectly played notes. This creates a magical and unforgettable experience. Musicians: Nightingale, Cuckoo, Moorhen, Pigeon, Curlew, Black-billed Cuckoo, House Sparrow, Little Owl, Woodcock, Green Woodpecker, Great Spotted Woodpecker, Middle Spotted Woodpecker, Lesser Spotted Woodpecker.

Constanza Silva

Silverfish Stream
file festival

The sound generated by the friction of the metallic robots against the floor, like that created by the contact between man and machine, is registered, altered and played in real time by the spheres, each with its own tonality, and amplified in the room. What is generated is a stream of multisensory information (visual, auditive, tactile), natural environment for mechanic creatures.

Kouichi Okamoto

Re Rain
“Re-rain” is a sound installation expressing non-visible elements such as gravity, magnetic force, and sound as physical elements. This installation is created with the sound of rain sampled in Japan early spring of 2016.The sound of raindrops hitting an umbrella are recorded, and is then played back from a speaker. The umbrella is set on top of a speaker, and the vibration of the speaker is transmitted through the umbrella to make a sound. For example, an umbrella cannot vibrate if the magnetic force of the speaker is small or if the rain hitting the umbrella is either too high or too low in pitch extent. For this reason, this is a device picking out a state in which the magnetic force of the speaker, weight of the umbrella, and pitch extent of sound are all in a balanced state. Natural phenomena such as rain travels through an object and is emitted as sound to the air..

Cod.Act

πTon/2
πTon/2 is a sound installation that intervenes in the continuity of the researches of Cod.Act on mechanical and sound organicity. It results from an experience on the deformation of an elastic form and its incidence on the evolution of a musical work. The object is a flexible ring closed on itself. It is set in motion by torsional engines located inside its body. πTon, by twisting and waving on itself, moves in a very natural and unpredictable way.

Chris Salter

n-Polytope: Behaviors in Light and Sound after Iannis Xenakis
N_Polytope: Behaviors in Light and Sound After Iannis Xenakis is a spectacular light and sound performance-installation combining cutting edge lighting, lasers, sound, sensing and machine learning software inspired by composer Iannis Xenakiss radical 1960s- 1970s works named Polytopes (from the Greek ‘poly’, many and ‘topos’, space). As large scale, immersive architectural environments that made the indeterminate and chaotic patterns and behaviour of natural phenomena experiential through the temporal dynamics of light and the spatial dynamics of sound, the Polytopes still to this day are relatively unknown but were far ahead of their time. N_Polytope is based on the attempt to both re-imagine Xenakis’ work with probabilistic/stochastic systems with new techniques as well as to explore how these techniques can exemplify our own historical moment of extreme instability.

Cod.Act

Sound City
Suspended from the ceiling by two springs and equipped with an oscillating weight fixed inside its body, a Sound City loudspeaker shakes in a disorderly manner in space. The music it plays reacts directly to the movements as if the musicians were inside the loudspeaker and trying in vain to adapt their playing to the turbulences. The originality of the movements comes from the pulsations and interferences produced by the interaction of two coupled harmonic oscillators (the spring and the pendulum) not having the same natural frequency. The two pneumatic jacks to which the springs are attached control the amplitude of the swings.

Nohlab

In-line
Nohlab’s audiovisual installation in-line was inspired by the natural phenomenon of horizon, and used a total of 21 LED panels, reflective surfaces on two ends, hazer and a quadraphonic sound system to turn the limited area into a limitless space and present an everchanging time-space experience […]The installation takes its form not only from the content, but also from the space it is exhibited. Its audio and video elements are especially designed for a holistic perception of sound and visuals, letting the audience live a synesthetic experience. This way, the audience steps into a different reality than the one they are already in.

UVA United Visual Artists

Great Animal Orchestra
The Fondation Cartier invited United Visual Artists to collaborate on The Great Animal Orchestra, exhibition that celebrates the work of musician, bio-acoustician and scientist Bernie Krause. Krause has been recording animals for 45 years and has amassed a collection of more than 5,000 hours of sounds  recording of over 15,000 individual species in their natural habitats from all over the world. UVA’s creative approach linked together the various exhibition content elements throughout the basement space — soundscapes, spectrograms and art works — into a cohesive, immersive experience that three-dimensionalises Krause’s recordings and suggests scenes from the natural world. The spectrograms form an abstract landscape, an interpretation of the various global locations and times of day that Krause made the original recordings in a way that envelops the audience and encourages them to linger in the space.

Ronald van der Meijs

A Time Capsule of Life
The sculpture is created from plastic bags, a contemporary mode of collecting daily goods. When connected together they form a transparent structure of cells and conduits. By connecting the bags with air tubes the bags will be pumped up. This is put in motion by the movement of the audience who become part of the system, allowing the seed to grow out as a mature structure. By vacuum the balloon structure growth and decay alternate in a process of which man forms a natural part. When the sculpture is growing or reducing it causes a cracking sound because of the sort of plastic the shopping bags are made of.

ANDY HUNTINGTON & DREW ALLAN

CYLINDER (SOUND SCULPTURE)
“Cylinder” surgió de un deseo de crear objetos complejos que partiesen de los abrumadores detalles que tiene la naturaleza. Andy Huntington y Drew Allan querian crear formas generadas algoritmicamente de una forma rápida usando técnicas capaces de esculpir objetos extremadamente complejos. Sin embargo, en lugar de utilizar código para generar la complejidad, se dedicaron a capturar la complejidad natural que nos rodea.

ROBERTO PUGLIESE

in side/out side
La tecnologia per Roberto Pugliese non è mai stata fine a se stessa. Il sound artist che da alcuni anni collabora con Studio la Città, pone sempre in primo piano il flusso vitale, il suono e la tecnica come componenti di un’interazione felice tra il naturale e l’artificiale.

MARSHMALLOW LASER FEAST MEMO AKTEN ROBIN

McNicholas and Barney Steel
Laser Forest

The public can explore the space, physically hitting, shaking, pulling and vibrating like trees for trigger sounds and lasers, provoking a very interactive collective experience. Resulting from the natural elasticity of the material, an interaction with the trees created with which they oscillate, creating patterns of vibration of light and sound. Each tree was tuned to a specific tone, creating harmonious children spatialized and played through a powerful surround sound system, and the more people, the cooler the experiment. The facility was designed to bring out in adults the feelings of curiosity and awe that are so vivid and evidence in children.