German Ermics

Ombré Glass Chair

“German Ermics is a Latvian designer who has recently presented to the public his splendid Ombré Glass Chair, which embodies the perfect tribute to To Shiro Kuramata and his iconic Glass Chair (1976), considered one of the iconic furniture designers of the 20th century. The keyword of his creation is “simplicity” combined with the transparency and the apparent lightness of the material, the result is an elegant minimal work.Another peculiarity of the chair is that it was manufactured with a new industrial product, the Photobond 100, welded without the use of screws or mounting-reinforcements, thus eliminating any superficiality.” Claudia Fuggetti

KAZUHIRO YAMANAKA

sound cloud
London-based designer kazuhiro yamanaka has created the ‘sound cloud’ a light-emitting quantum glass speaker system installation for saazs ‘a glass house’ program. the structure is composed of five interactive monolithic glass panels, formed with the intention of modelling the integration of innovative glass within architecture and design. the sound and light radiating from ‘sound cloud’ shift in unison, their synchronization may be altered by the viewer as they adjust their aural and visual experience by means of a touch-screen controller.
yamanaka aspired for the visitors to ‘be able to hear the sound move from one to another, jumping back and forth and echoing from the panels.’
a sound module is attached to each panel. as it vibrates,the three layers of glass move at a frequency, which creates optimum sound quality. the sound for the installation was developed by the france-based sound designer, gling-glang. yamanaka and gling-glang devised a soundscape by which ‘sound cloud’ visitors were able to sense the sculptural construction of the music in walking through the installation’s glass-paneled pathway.
the glass is outfitted with a light-emitting system known as ‘LED in glass’, invented by quantum glass. through this technology, the panels become a source of light. the ‘sound cloud’ is illuminated as the LED bars are fitted around the edge of the panel in order to direct beams of light through the edge of the extra clear glass sheet. as a result, light refraction occurs from the front side by means of a white enamel screen print on the opposite side.
yamanaka chose to slightly obscure the brightness of the glass sound system by creating a thin layer from millions of light dots, culminating in a cloud-like shape.

ron arad

رون اراد
阿拉德
רון ארד
ロン·アラッド
론 아라드
РОН АРАД
evocative proposal
For the canadian national holocaust monument competition, Ron Arad Studio teamed up with david adjaye associates to envision an evocative proposal commemorating the events, victims, and survivors of a grave moment in human history. Avoiding the use of direct symbols, the design places 23 sinuous and slender walls parallel to one another, creating a field of canyon-like passageways. Spaced 120 centimeters (47 in) apart, visitors are only able to pass through each crevice in single file. The partitions rise to a height of 14 meters (46 feet), drawing the eye upward toward the framed sky. This isolated journey is complemented by the shared experience of reflecting back on the monument’s significance.

JONATHAN SCHIPPER

To Dust
Two sculptures are hung from a mechanism that gently grinds them into each other. The sculptures will slide against one another for many years creating new unimagined form.

Iris van Herpen

Transmotion
The term transmotion not only depicts the process of change from one state, form, style or place to another, it is also the visionary perceptions of the seasons and the visual scenes of motion in art and literature. In parallel to Iris van Herpen’s drive to visualise the invisible, her quest to question reality and urge to explore the realms of impossibility, the project aims to narrate the process that ushers change, to materialise an unconscious state of meditation.

Kian-Peng Ong

Coronado
File festival
“Coronado” was inspired by a visit to the Coronado beach in California, which was an awe inspiring moment never experienced in other beaches. The soundscape present in Coronado seemed to be coming from all directions with layers and layers of sound waves. I decided then that I would make a sound work to translate this experience. The sound installation is characterized by the interplay of the analog and digital sound sources which layers over one another, exploring the idea of a seascape. The center of the installation is an ocean drum controlled with mechanical arms that creates and simulates the sound of sea waves. This is picked up by the microphone, reprocessed through the computer and sent out to the 6 channel surround speakers in different time. The interplay and sense of endlessness in the layering the analog and digital are my interpretation and response to the wonderment I found in Coronado.