Sabrina Ratté

FLORALIA I
Inspired by the writings of Donna J. Haraway, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Greg Egan, the work plunges us into a speculative future, where samples of then extinct plant species are preserved and displayed in a virtual archive room. Through editing and visual strategies, this archive room is sporadically transformed under the effect of interference caused by the memory emanating from the listed plants, revealing traces of a past that continues to haunt the place. Floralia is a simulation of ecosystems born from the fusion of technology and organic matter, where past and future coexist in a perpetual tension of the present.

PHILIP BEESLEY

菲力浦 畢斯雷

Hylozoic Ground

The project’s title refers to ‘hylozoism’, the ancient belief that all matter has life. Hylozoic Ground offers a vision for a new generation of responsive architecture. The Hylozoic Ground environment can be described as a suspended geotextile that gradually accumulates hybrid soil from ingredients drawn from its surroundings. Akin to the functions of a living system, embedded machine intelligence allows human interaction to trigger breathing, caressing, and swallowing motions and hybrid metabolic exchanges. These empathic motions ripple out from hives of kinetic valves and pores in peristaltic waves, creating a diffuse pumping that pulls air, moisture and stray organic matter through the filtering Hylozoic membranes.

YUNG CHENG LIN

ЮНГ ЧЕНГ ЛИН
يونغ تشنغ لين

The photographic experiments of the Taiwanese artist Yung Cheng Lin, aka 3cm, who confronts the human anatomy to external elements such as red thread or simple fruits, imagining surreal and geometric compositions. Some intense and disturbing conceptual photographs, which question our relation to the body and organic matter.

LIN YUN CHENG

ЮНГ ЧЕНГ ЛИН
يونغ تشنغ لين

The photographic experiments of the Taiwanese artist Yung Cheng Lin, aka 3cm, who confronts the human anatomy to external elements such as red thread or simple fruits, imagining surreal and geometric compositions. Some intense and disturbing conceptual photographs, which question our relation to the body and organic matter.

LIN YUN CHENG

ЮНГ ЧЕНГ ЛИН
يونغ تشنغ لين

The photographic experiments of the Taiwanese artist Yung Cheng Lin, aka 3cm, who confronts the human anatomy to external elements such as red thread or simple fruits, imagining surreal and geometric compositions. Some intense and disturbing conceptual photographs, which question our relation to the body and organic matter.

Yung Cheng Lin

Юнг Ченг Лин
يونغ تشنغ لين

The photographic experiments of the Taiwanese artist Yung Cheng Lin, aka 3cm, who confronts the human anatomy to external elements such as red thread or simple fruits, imagining surreal and geometric compositions. Some intense and disturbing conceptual photographs, which question our relation to the body and organic matter.

LUKA FINEISEN

Organic Matter II

ANDY LOMAS

Morphogenetic Creations
Created by a mathematician, digital artist and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer generated effects – Andy Lomas, Morphogenetic Creations is a collection of works that explore the nature of complex forms that can be produced by digital simulation of growth systems. These pieces start with a simple initial form which is incrementally developed over time by adding iterative layers of complexity to the structure.The aim is to create structures emergently: exploring generic similarities between many different forms in nature rather than recreating any particular organism. In the process he is exploring universal archetypal forms that can come from growth processes rather than top-down externally engineered design.Programmed using C++ with CUDA, the series use a system of growth by deposition: small particles of matter are repeatedly deposited onto a growing structure to build incrementally over time. Rules are used to determine how new particles are created, and how they move before being deposited. Small changes to these rules can have dramatic effects on the final structure, in effect changing the environment in which the form is grown. To create these works, Andy uses the GPU as a compute device rather than as a display device. All the data is held in memory on the GPU and various kernel functions are called to do things like apply forces to the cells, make cells split, and to render the cells using ray-tracing. The simulations and rendering for each of the different animated structures within this piece take about 12 hours to run, Andy explains. By the end of the simulations there are over 50,000,000 cells in each structure.The Cellular Forms use a more biological model, representing a simplified system of cellular growth. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for the forces between cells, as well as rules for how cells accumulate internal nutrients. When the nutrient level in a cell exceeds a given threshold the cell splits into two, with both the parent and daughter cells reconnecting to their immediate neighbours. Many different complex organic structures are seen to arise from subtle variations on these rules, creating forms with strong reminiscences of plants, corals, internal organs and micro-organisms.

Maya Alam

Interference Fit Canyon
“by Maya Alam uses an entropic drawing process to capture the coalescence of solid and fluid states of matter within a single object. The drawing is comprised of contours that delineate a cube with hard edges that appear to be soft from particular vantage points and soft edges that appear to be hard from others. These contours are mapped back onto the cube geometry in a transitional process whereby the legibility of the cube becomes progressively more inscrutable. The drawing process parallels the effects created by the presence of a cubic object within the L.A. River that disrupts the flow of water and accentuates the presence of detritus. A process of continual erosion acts differentially on the object over time, transforming its appearance and performance in relation to water flow”. Marcelyn Gow

ARNE QUINZE

Арне Куинз
Chaos Life
The composition of a Chaos artwork started as a self-portrait; the representation of what’s going on in his head. But soon a shift occurred towards an enduring research on the definition of chaos in society. Often these artworks are filled with a mass of small wooden sticks attached to each other, looking enormously chaotic. “There’s no chaos, only structure” is a tagline in some of his work expressing his inner self and how he describes his thoughts. To him there is no chaos, everything is structured even in the chaos you find structure. There’s no such thing as chaos in Quinze’s world or at least not in the sense of how society defines chaos. Chaos does exist, as a form of structure. Chaos is irretrievably linked with life. In life everything is a matter of rhythm. Something without a rigid structure is part of the organic order in life.

TOBY ZIEGLER

Encompassing painting and sculpture, Zeigler’s practice takes its starting point from the digital. His works often begin as computer-constructed images, which are then painstakingly transformed by hand onto canvas or into three-dimensional forms. The geometric aesthetic contrasts with the organic subject matter of landscapes, skies and animals; the use of computer programming speaks to a contemporary condition of understanding and interacting with the world through technology.

Justin Vin

Wave house
If you would build a house made of moving waves? What it would be? Art director Justin Vin has collaborated with team of talented artists to find this out. This project is an approach to see and feel technologies in new way – as organic, friendly environments. It is nurturing, divine and filled with spirituality. Intuitive and friendly. Inspired by today’s emerging technologies – claytronics, programmable matter, quantum locking – we eventually came to the vision of Wave House. A home of beauty, freedom and softness. We see big spaces, like temple or church and a surrealism, surrounding it.