Cassie Mcquarter

Halo
In these six animated paintings presented as a single channel video, the artist reenacts situations and motifs from the first-person shooter series Halo and the erotic videogame Dream Stripper. Conceived as a dynamic, virtual collage, HALO shows short stock animation loops of characters dying over and over, with koi, dining chairs, asteroids, guns, flowers, torches, pinball machines, candles, and discarded pillows floating around them, creating a hypnotic motion.

PETER GREENAWAY

بيتر غريناواي
彼得·格林纳威
פיטר גרינווי
ピーター·グリーナウェイ
피터 그리너웨이
Питер Гринуэй
The Pillow Book
Beautiful to behold and impossible to forget, THE PILLOW BOOK is auteur Peter Greenaway’s erotically-charged drama about love, death, revenge and the indelible nature of our earliest memories. Each year on her birthday, Nagiko (Vivian Wu) would became her father’s canvas, as he painted the creation myth in elaborate, elegant calligraphy on her body. Years later, she continues the practice with a succession of lovers, including a bisexual translator (Ewan McGregor) who becomes a pawn in an escalating game of vengeance against her beloved father’s exploitative publisher. Told in a series of chapters and featuring innovative cinematography and picture-in-picture techniques, Roger Ebert called THE PILLOW BOOK “a seductive and elegant story [that] stands outside the ordinary.”

cinema full

Lin Hwai-min

cursive II
Ross MacGibbon
Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan
Lin Hwai-min’s Cursive II is inspired by the aesthetics of calligraphy. Set to music by John Cage, it is an exquisite meditation on the balancing of opposites presented in delicate simplicity, allowing no distraction from the details of the dance.

BERNARDO SCHORR

Heart Pillow
File Festival
“Heart Pillow” is a transhuman artifact that reproduces a person’s heartbeat remotely and in real time. It allows the very pulse of life to be transferred into an everyday object – a pillow – making it serve both as an extension to the user’s body and as mimicry of life itself, playing with the perceptions we might have on how life can be defined. It raises interesting questions on the meaning of the words “emotion” and “affection” and their scalability to the various modes of interaction that may arise from an augmented object. “Heart Pillow” can be used in any situations in which transferring a heartbeat into an everyday object can be interesting or useful, such as connecting a couple that is apart, to calm down new born babies with the known feeling of their mother’s heartbeat or as an extension of the self into an everyday object as a mean of reflection.

ELLINOR ERICSSON

A student from Danish Design School, Ellinor Ericsson has designed a chair called TubeMe which was exhibited on the Stockholm Furniture Fair 2011. In designer’s words, “The TubeMe chair is about a tactile interaction with a chair. You are able to braid the naked chair with pillow tubes creating your own upholster with the different textiles. While actually sitting in the chair you can interact with it by using the tubes or just throw them around you and fall asleep being embraced.”

dominic peternel and stephen coorlas

Dominic Peternel and Stephen Coorlas’ solution to this timeless question of how to clad a building was answered by creating a pattern to envelop the contradictive personalities of the structure. The pillowing or gator skinned exterior morphs along with the building, highlighting the cuts made in the initial structure, and following the curves and lines of the building […]

GERALDO ZAMPRONI

GIANT INFLATED PILLOWS
The monolithic red cushions have been shown as part of various events throughout brazil, peru, argentina and spain – peppering landscapes with the massive artworks as if squeezed within the crevices of each city. The interventions interrogate architecture and landscape – providing a new perspective on a space that depicts tension and uneasiness.

Audrius Bucas and Valdas Ozarinskas

Black Pillow

Stephen Cornford

Binatone Galaxy

An installation for used cassette players which looks on their obsolescence not as an ending, but as an opportunity to reconsider their functional potential. Superseded as playback devices, they become instruments in their own right. Replacing the prerecorded content of each tape with a microphone gives us the chance to listen instead to the rhythmic and resonant properties of these once ubiquitous plastic shells. Binatone Galaxy brings the framework within which a generation purchased their favourite records to the centre of attention, revealing the acoustics of the cassette and the voices of the machines themselves.“On the walls of a white room, brightly illuminated with natural light, Stephen Cornford, and artist who describes his work as existing “at the intersection of sculpture and music”, has mounted some 30 old cassette recorders. Models from Boots, Sanyo, Robotic, one lone and gorgeously named Binatone Galaxy: they all hang on the walls, wired up, tapes loaded and ready for action. Smitten by an attack of technological melancholia, the visitor can wonder who owned these things, what pop charts did these machines once record? Were they ever placed next to pillows, late at night for surreptitious listening pleasures? What happened to the voices that once rubbed the magnetic heads of these little machines? For some artists, the speed (and resulting impact) of obsolescence on the technology we once took for granted has spawned a form of fetishism, in which the voices – the human agency – they once recorded exist in an alternate, ghostly dimension, a reminder of what once was. This is not Cornford’s theme. The fact that each audio cassette in his machines is fitted with a motion sensor and a contact mic, so that, on entry the machines whirr into action, indicates that Binatone Galaxy is very much of the here and now. Yes, Cornford has chosen old, cheap and accessible technology with which to realise this, but I suspect that he is aiming for a furrruuuzzy audio intimacy.

Joo Youn Paek

Pillowig