JANA STERBAK

ヤナ・スターバック
Remote Control

Desde fines de los años setenta, la obra de Jana Sterbak (1955), artista nacida en Praga, República Checa (vive en Montreal y París), tiene como motivo el cuerpo, por lo general afectado por la polisemia y la ambigüedad. En algunos trabajos se advierten las reminiscencias de Praga, como algunos mitos medievales, cuentos populares y la literatura de Franz Kafka, Karel Capek y Jaroslav Hasek. Todo su trabajo maduro oscila entre la ironía y la obstrucción, entre el absurdo y la tragedia.

AKIRA KANAYAMA

Remote control painting

ZIWON WANG

My name is Z
The artist invokes the debate on mechanization, and sense of self. Is it a thing of the far future or is it already an integrated part of our lives? For instance, if a human drives stick transmission automobile, in a broad sense, the human is mechanized suitable to the stick transmission automobile, and if the human drives automatic transmission automobile, the human is mechanized to the automatic transmission automobile.Wang says. We all live each day as a part of machine and mechanization deepens gradually. The body is gradually deprived. Yesterday, my finger took over remote control; today, the remote control takes over my finger. by various modes of assimilating the data of the world.”

DILLER SCOFIDIO + RENFRO

SLOW HOUSE

To either side of the “picture window” are two antenna-like stacks: the chimney is to the right, the video apparatus to the left. At the summit of the left stack sits a live video camera directed at the water view and feeding the monitor in front of the picture window. The electronic view is operable; the camera can pan or zoom by remote control. When recorded, the view may be deferred— day played back at night, fair weather played back in foul. The composite view formed by the screen in front of the picture window is always out of register, collapsing the opposition between the authentic and mediated.

STELARC

Reclining Stickman
Reclining StickMan is a 9m long robot, actuated by pneumatic rubber muscles. Visitors at the AGSA can intuitively animate the robot from a control panel. At indicated periods, people online elsewhere can choreograph its movements and sounds. A background algorithm animates the robot intermittently if no-one intervenes, locally or remotely.

Lauren Lee McCarthy

SOMEONE
SOMEONE imagines a human version of Amazon Alexa, a smart home intelligence for people in their own homes. For a two month period in 2019, four participants’ homes around the United States were installed with custom-designed smart devices, including cameras, microphones, lights, and other appliances. 205 Hudson Gallery in NYC housed a command center where visitors could peek into the four homes via laptops, watch over them, and remotely control their networked devices. Visitors would hear smart home occupants call out for “Someone”—prompting the visitors to step in as their home automation assistant and respond to their needs. This video installation presents documentation from the initial performance on four screens throughout the space.

Geumhyung Jeong

Homemade RC Toy
Her new installation centers on five human-scale, remote-control sculptures that she cobbled together from metal brackets, batteries, wires, dental study props, and disassembled mannequins. Surrounding them are stepped plinths whose bright colors echo the robot sculptures’ wiring. The plinths display fetishistic agglomerations of spare parts: wheels, cables, gutted medical practice torsos, home repair parts. In their default state, the sculptures are frozen, comatose, even if all that wiring and machinery certainly suggests movement. The installation is the setting for a series of live interactions between the artist and her uncanny others.

Sofi Zezmer

Remote Control

RICARDO BARRETO, MARIA HSU and AMUDI

feel Me tactile interactive bed
File Festival
“feelMe” is a work that for the first time remotely transmits the tactile sensation. Our work provokes the exploration of the sense of touch while promoting the interaction between two people mediated by a machine. The work is constituted of two surfaces, or “beds”: the first one (tactile transmission unit), in which one of the participants, layed down, imprints marks to its surface by pressing it with the weight and movement of the different parts of his/her body; these impressions will be captured and transmitted to the other participant, who lies in the second “bed” (tactile reception unit) and receives them simultaneously in the same positions and in proportional intensities, however, in negative, that is, when the surface in the first bed sinks, it rises in the second one, promoting a touch. The first body touches the second one, and the “beds” may be a few meters or thousands of kilometers apart from each other. Between the bodies, dozens of occult sensors, microcontrollers, engines (lineal actors), computers and a program that orchestrates that tactile communication. We allow the participant to experiment the possibilities of encounter between bodies through the digital world, with a different approach from the one provided by virtual reality. We want to explore the tactile perception separately in its “corporal way”, and only in future works to propose the expansion/extension of multimedia perception with the inclusion of tactile perception.