robert seidel

Vitreous
The nine virtual sculptures underlying vitreous resulted from experimental setups by Robert Seidel for generating three-dimensional clusters of fibrous refractions, as well as the gravitational lensing of different volumetric and chromatic densities. Singular elements gravitate towards each other, accumulating in a gigantic sculptural system, where each entity exists with its own visual axis and vanishing point. The impalpable luminous formations create prismatic interactions between the ridges and plateaux of the main colours floating in front of the infinite violet background.

YUNCHUL KIM

Impulse
The Cascade Project explores matter by capturing the pattern of muons: i.e. electrically charged subatomic particles. It does so through an installation comprised of three live elements: a muon detector; a complex assemblage of pumps; and an arrangement of tubes through which fluid flows. When muons are detected, a light and connected pumps are activated, triggering the movement of an uncanny, viscous fluid through the sculptural system.

localStyle (Marlena Novak & Jay Alan Yim) in collaboration with Malcolm MacIver

Scale
‘scale’ is an interspecies art project: an audience-interactive installation that involves nocturnal electric fish from the Amazon River Basin. Twelve different species of these fish comprise a choir whose sonified electrical fields provide the source tones for an immersive audiovisual environment. The fish are housed in individual tanks configured in a custom-built sculptural arc of aluminum frames placed around a central podium. The electrical field from each fish is translated into sound, and is thus heard — unprocessed or with digital effects added, with immediate control over volume via a touchscreen panel — through a 12-channel surround sound system, and with LED arrays under each tank for visual feedback. All software is custom-designed. Audience members interact as deejays with the system. Amongst the goals of the project is our desire to foster wider public awareness of these remarkable creatures, their importance to the field of neurological research, and the fragility of their native ecosystem.The project leaders comprise visual/conceptual artist Marlena Novak, composer/sound designer Jay Alan Yim, and neural engineer Malcolm MacIver. MacIver’s research focuses on sensory processing and locomotion in electric fish and translating this research into bio-inspired technologies for sensing and underwater propulsion through advanced fish robots. Novak and Yim, collaborating as ‘localStyle’, make intermedia works that explore perceptual themes, addressing both physical and psychological thresholds in the context of behavior, society/politics, and aesthetics.

KAZUHIRO YAMANAKA

sound cloud
London-based designer kazuhiro yamanaka has created the ‘sound cloud’ a light-emitting quantum glass speaker system installation for saazs ‘a glass house’ program. the structure is composed of five interactive monolithic glass panels, formed with the intention of modelling the integration of innovative glass within architecture and design. the sound and light radiating from ‘sound cloud’ shift in unison, their synchronization may be altered by the viewer as they adjust their aural and visual experience by means of a touch-screen controller.
yamanaka aspired for the visitors to ‘be able to hear the sound move from one to another, jumping back and forth and echoing from the panels.’
a sound module is attached to each panel. as it vibrates,the three layers of glass move at a frequency, which creates optimum sound quality. the sound for the installation was developed by the france-based sound designer, gling-glang. yamanaka and gling-glang devised a soundscape by which ‘sound cloud’ visitors were able to sense the sculptural construction of the music in walking through the installation’s glass-paneled pathway.
the glass is outfitted with a light-emitting system known as ‘LED in glass’, invented by quantum glass. through this technology, the panels become a source of light. the ‘sound cloud’ is illuminated as the LED bars are fitted around the edge of the panel in order to direct beams of light through the edge of the extra clear glass sheet. as a result, light refraction occurs from the front side by means of a white enamel screen print on the opposite side.
yamanaka chose to slightly obscure the brightness of the glass sound system by creating a thin layer from millions of light dots, culminating in a cloud-like shape.

Rosie Danford Phillips

Opulent Virulence
“My collection is inspired by my fascination with nature; an interpretation of the complexity and unrestrained beauty of nature, which I express through complex layering, colour and a maximalist aesthetic that takes joy in abundance and opulence. I create my own ecosystems of layered and built fabrics in knit, print and unconventional embroidery. My clothes are in a state of rewilding – I infect the silhouettes with rich colourful textiles, giving them life. I grow my embroideries over graphic and sculptural silhouettes to emphasise and contrast the organic and the built landscape.” Rosie Danford Phillips

KADO BUNPEI

Tree of Chair
Through his sculptural practice, artist Pontus Willfors says that he seeks to examine “aspects of nature that are viewed by our society as product, nuisance or waste.” One of his frequently recurring motifs is the form of tree branches and root systems that sprout from from everyday objects as seen in this collection of furniture pieces that remind us explicitly of the material’s origins.

Erwin Wurm

ארווין וורם
アーウィンウーム
ЭРВИН ВУРМ

Erwin Wurm, one of Austria’s most important and internationally famous sculptors, has been preoccupied with expanding the concept of sculpture since the 1980s. Wurm is primarily a sculptor, and traditional sculptural concerns such as the relationship between object and pedestal, the function of gravity, the fixing of form, and the manipulation of volume, play through all his work.
Increasing, remodeling or removing volume, the habitual interests of many sculptors, are given a new twist in Wurm’s work. Volume and adding volume are treated as sociocrital issues. In 1993, Erwin Wurm wrote an instructional book on how to gain two clothing sizes in eight days. Eight years later, he made his first Fat Car by plumping up an existing car with styrofoam and fiberglass, which resulted in a pitiful, chubby version of the original sportsy model. By taking the question of obesity, Wurm probes the link between power, wealth and body weight. He also wants to offer a sharp criticism of our current value system, as the advertising world demands us to stay thin but to consume more and more.

Mark Lawrence Stafford

via highlike submit
“While marketing drives demand and justifies the over-production of consumer electronics, I create sculptural landscapes and video installations from the circuit boards left behind in the wake of obsolescence. The majority of this material would be in landfills or contaminating our ecosystem from the recycling of precious metals and other natural resources.”

Heather Phillipson

100% Other Fibres
Through collisions of image, noise, objects, language and bodies, Heather Phillipson’s videos and sculptural installations behave as places, musical scores, poems and nervous systems – attending to how physical and affective ‘selves’ are constructed, manipulated and, above all, escape. Often rendered as walk-in conglomerations of readily accessible materials (digital images, paint, cardboard, words, audio loops and reproducible consumer detritus), her works stake out an ambiguous territory in which cultural references and emotional responses are mutually contingent and reactive. Collapsing distinctions between the forthright and the inarticulable, the banal and the ecstatic, and between metaphor and extreme literalisation, Phillipson’s work performs constant tonal shifts, disruptions and bleeds. In so doing, it oscillates between physical intimacies and conceptual distances – desire, sensuality, touching and being touched, shame, anxiety, (over-)exposure, resistant surfaces.

BRANDON VICKERD

CHAMPIONS OF ENTROPY

As a sculptor, I am interested in objects that act as catalyst for an anti-environment – a mindset or space that is not defined, and therefore, infinite in possibilities.The human tendency towards ordering has become an extension of ownership – to understand opens up the possibility of manipulation.Sculpture works in opposition to this.Sculpture is a demonstration of entropy – entropy being the measurable amount of disorder within any system. The system, in this case, is all order. Sculpture is potentially anarchy. The sculptural object is a celebration of wavering logic and structure, exposing the eminent disorder within all systems.

NICOLAS SCHÖFFER

ニコラ·シェフェール

Cet intérêt pour le dynamisme artistique a été initié par les cubo-futuristes puis intensifié et solidifié par les artistes constructivistes, tels que Naum Gabo, Anton Pevsner, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy et Ludwig Hirschfeld-Mack, soucieux d’ouvrir les trois statiques. -Forme sculpturale dimensionnelle à une quatrième dimension du temps et du mouvement. Et c’était aussi l’intention de Schöffer. En 1948, il a commencé à explorer la spatio-dynamique, plus tard en 1957 la luminodynamique (en intégrant la lumière, la musique, le film), et depuis 1959 l’élément du temps aboutissant aux travaux cinétiques (chronodynamique). Schöffer cependant, venant bien après, a bénéficié des théories cybernétiques (théories des systèmes de rétroaction principalement basées sur les idées de Norbert Wiener) en ce qu’elles lui suggéraient des processus artistiques en termes d’organisation du système qui le manifestait (par exemple, la causalité circulaire de boucles de rétroaction). Pour Schöffer, cela a permis à la cybernétique d’élucider des relations artistiques complexes à partir de l’œuvre elle-même.