Tomas SARACENO

توماس ساراسينو
托马斯·萨拉切诺
トマスサラセーノ
Space elevator / Spark

Black polyester rope, plastic cable ties, metal frame.

Having studied as an architect, Tomas Saraceno incorporates physics, engineering, and aeronautics into his interactive and evolving artistic structures. Using arachnology, or the study of spiders, to create structures that suggest alternative ways of living, he employs tridimensional webs to better understand how unique building blocks create distinct forms. Saraceno places spiders in cubic frames and leaves them to spin webs, rotating the cubes at various intervals to introduce elements of freedom

HUANG YI & KUKA

The work fulfills Huang’s childhood dream of having a robot dance partner and required development from scratch.  After learning the mechanics of the industrial KUKA robot, he conceptualized the movements and programmed the machine to create the partner he wanted.   He says of the experience, “Dancing face to face with a robot is like looking at my own face in a mirror… I think I have found the key to spin human emotions into robots.” It was developed into a full-length piece with two additional dancers as part of 3-Legged Dog Art & Technology Center‘s Artist Residency program and their 3LD/3D+ program.

Pangenerator

The shimmering pulse
The installation consists of 451 independent modules arranged in a form of hexagon – each module reacts to light it receives by spinning iridescent disc that spreads out thanks to centrifugal force, creating a unique kinetic “physical pixel”. That field of shimmering pixels is combined with light projection mapped onto the installation surface to visualize real-time data of the traffic in the Shenzhen area – the hexagon is divided into sections corresponding the 9 city districts. As a result the public can observe and interact with the object that represents the pulse of life of the city in an artful and unexpected way.

KAL SPELLETICH

FIRE SHOWER

Volunteer stands in the middle of a spinning cage on fire, like being in a tornado of fire!

Iris van Herpen

АЙРИС ВАН ЭРПЕН
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン
Autumn/Winter 2019
This season van Herpen collaborated with American kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe, whose pieces are powered by the wind. His spherical Omniverse sculpture had pride of place in the Élysée Montmartre venue. The designer said she was compelled by the way its arching vertebrae, spinning on a curving axis, simultaneously expand and contract. Her finale dress was made in the image of Omniverse, with rotating wings constructed of aluminum, stainless steel, and feathers.

TAO dance theater

4&5
Tao Ye likes to designate his dances by number rather than name. After 4 comes 5, his latest to appear in the US: the 27-year-old choreographer behind Beijing’s six-member Tao Dance Theater is just getting started. And yet he is already a worldwide festival favourite and distinctive to boot, in spite of – or perhaps because of – his deliberately limited means. From 2012, 4 restricted itself to four dancers moving in unison and in a tight cohort within the square of the stage. The dancers’ faces were blacked out, their gaze down, their spines never succumbing to the easy beauty of uprightness, and their voluminous costumes, full of folds and creases, were identical.

DANIEL WIDRIG

Даниэль Видрик
Little Black Spine

芸術デザイナーのダニエル・ウィドリグは、このウェアラブルアートシリーズの背後にいます。 これらの3D印刷された作品は、彼のKinesisコレクションの一部です。 これらの彫刻の付属品のいくつかは骨のように見えますが、他は非常に抽象的なものです。 これらの印象的なデザインはすべて黒で行われているようで、非常に想像力に富んでいます。 このウェアラブルアートコレクションの背後にあるアイデアは、それらを身に着けている人の体に合わせたカスタムアクセサリーを作ることです。 ピースが外骨格に似ている場合、これは特にクールです。 これらのぴったりとしたアートワークは、平均的なアクセサリーよりも興味深いものです。 彼らは体のさまざまな領域に重点を置くことを意図しており、まさにそれを行います。 Widrigのクリエイティブな印刷コレクションは、大胆で非常に詳細です。 これらの作品はあなたの体を生き生きとした呼吸する芸術作品に変えます。

MARCEL DUCHAMP

مارسيل دوشامب
马塞尔·杜尚
מרסל דושאן
マルセル·デュシャン
Марсель Дюшан
Étant donnés
Duchamp worked secretly on the piece from 1946 to 1966 in his Greenwich Village studio.[2] It is composed of an old wooden door, nails, bricks, brass, aluminium sheet, steel binder clips, velvet, leaves, twigs, a female form made of parchment, hair, glass, plastic clothespins, oil paint, linoleum, an assortment of lights, a landscape composed of hand-painted and photographed elements and an electric motor housed in a cookie tin which rotates a perforated disc. The Brazilian sculptor Maria Martins, Duchamp’s girlfriend from 1946 to 1951, served as the model for the female figure in the piece, and his second wife, Alexina (Teeny), served as the model for the figure’s arm. Duchamp prepared a “Manual of Instructions” in a 4-ring binder explaining and illustrating how to assemble and disassemble the piece.