Aleksandr Sokurov

ألكسندر سوكوروف
亚历山大·索科洛夫
Александр Сокуров
Russian Ark

“Alexander Sokurov’s desire to film The Russian Arch in one continuous take required extraordinary technical solutions. Since it is physically impossible to shoot more than twelve minutes of conventional film, we had to shoot on video. However, it was only the relatively recent arrival of 24p high definition compact cameras that offered the visual quality and the ability to make this film for theaters, including transferring the digital image to a 35mm negative.With the help of German specialists a complex portable platform was designed to meet the demands of the scenario which included precise architectural plans, highlighting the distance of 1300 meters covered by the course of the action. It was decided that the only way to move the camera would be to use a steadycam, although we could not be sure until after the final image that such a long steadycam shot would be possible, given the physical performance. extreme demanded from the German cinematographer, Tilman Büttner. After months of rehearsals, the 867 actors and extras, the three “live” orchestras all had to know their position and precise roles “. It’s just amazing.

cinema full

Knight Architects and structural engineers AKT II

Moving footbridge
Paddington, London
Opening in sequence, the bridge’s five beams rise to different angles to create a fan-like effect. The first rises to 70 degrees, while the last lifts high enough to create a clearance space of two and a half metres over the surface of the canal. The weight of the beams – which range from six to seven tons – is balanced by a 40 ton counterweight that keeps the beams steady as they rise and fall.

Matt Kenyon

Мэтт Кеньон
مات كينيون
매트 케년
マット・ケニヨン
Supermajor

In Supermajor, a rack of vintage oil cans sits innocuously on the gallery floor. A punctured can, located somewhere mid-stack, has sprung a leak. The oil flows out in a steady trickle, cascading onto the pedestal below; a golden-brown pool forms at its base. Upon closer inspection, however, the oil is not originating from the can. Instead, its stream is reversed. Drop-by-drop the oil flows upwards, defying gravity. At times, droplets even appear to hover in mid-air. Returning to its source, the upward ascent of oil continues uninterrupted as if neither the can’s reserves of the nor the puddle’s can ever be depleted.
FILE FESTIVAL

SHIOYASUTOMOKO

塩保朋子
waterfall

From a distance, Tomoko Shioyasu’s giant art pieces could be confused for immense maps of weather patterns rather than intricately cut paper tapestries. In fact, the Japanese artist is heavily influenced and inspired by the elements of nature such as the force of wind or the patterns of cells so it’s no wonder that his work has such an organic look and feel. Using utility knives, soldering irons, charcoal, and a steady hand, she creates floor to ceiling paper tapestries with the forces of nature in mind.

craig green

克雷格·格林
크레이그 그린
קרייג גרין
クレイグ・グリーン
Крейг Грин

Exploring concepts of uniform and utility, Green’s cult-like runway processions have become a highly anticipated fixture of the menswear calendar. Though known for their dramatic and deeply emotive qualities, his collections are firmly rooted in the steady development of simple, yet rigorously considered signature garments such as the Worker Jacket.more