DANIEL BUREN

دانيال بورين
丹尼尔·布伦
다니엘 뷰렌
ダニエル·ビュラン
ДАНИЭЛЬ БЮРЕН

Daniel Buren a french conceptualist who is well known for his trademark work with stripes is oftentimes referred to as an abstract minimalist.
Challenging the conventional methods of displaying and presenting art, Buren gained notoriety at his first solo exhibition in 1968 when he glued green and white striped materiel to the exterior door of the Apollinaire Gallery in Milan. With a philosophy of reducing art into its more elemental forms while exploring the impact of repetitive motifs, his work with pattern, form and color draws attention to the surrounding environment and architectural framework rather than combating it. Instead of rejecting the environment in which his installations are produced, Buren integrates his art with the space and changes the fundamental nature of the space itself.

ELECTRONICOS FANTASTICOS!

Electro-Magnetic Band
Barcodress/Barcodance
ELECTRONICOS FANTASTICOS! project has been reincarnating various retired consumer electronics as musical instruments such as Electric Fan Harp, CRT-TV Drums, Air Conditioner Harp etc. The band plays them by catching electromagnetic waves. The Barcodress project aims to create the new kind of dance performance. The clothes which recorded sounds as striped patterns, and dancers, and the performers who scan the clothes, together make electric sound waves in real time. By expanding the principles of sound recording and playback to the body, we explore new possibilities for music and dance expression.

MICHAEL CLARK COMPANY

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー
Tate Project Part I ]

The choreography rehearsed and performed in 2010 paired the rigour of classical steps with contemporary movement, a juxtaposition that paralleled Clark’s training as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet, and his later anti-hierarchical, anti-authoritarian choreographic experiments. Balletic poses, jumps and steps were isolated from traditional narrative sequences and made strange through repetition. The graceful leaps and turns of the trained dancers seemed awkward and uneven, just as they were often out of sync and oriented in different directions. This choreography paralleled the performance space, which was demarcated by geometric and striped floor mats designed by Charles Atlas, which resembled the large windows at the back of the hall and the black beams that extend vertically from floor to ceiling.