Dan Holdsworth

Acceleration Structures
Dan Holdsworth’s ‘Acceleration Structures’ explores and examines the topography of three great Alpine glaciers, capturing their fragility and intricacy like no artist has done before. Using geomapping technology, Holdsworth’s films guide the viewer through the skeletal landscape of each glacier, giving a unique perspective and a new understanding of their geography.

Laura Splan

Disrupted Domains
Disrupted Domains features new animations created with molecular visualization software and SARS-CoV-2 structures displayed in Quorum at the Science Center. The animations were developed in remote collaboration with uCity Square biotech company Integral Molecular for Splan’s Science Center Bioart Residency while “sheltering in place” for COVID-19. The work in the exhibition is part of Precarious Structures, Splan’s project that explores the interconnectedness of cultural and biological systems during the coronavirus pandemic. Accompanying soundscape by Frank Masciocchi recorded in collaboration with Splan over Zoom.
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Haegue Yang

Sol LeWitt Upside Down
Haegue Yang’s expansive installation, titled Sol LeWitt Upside Down – Structure with Three Towers, Expanded 23 Times, Split in Three, consists of over 500 independent components made of Venetian blinds that together recreate one of LeWitt’s signature works from 1986 – connecting LeWitt’s work to her own attempts to be liberated from the urge to compose, and the way modular thinking leads towards proliferation. Magnifying its size 23 times and hanging it upside down, this is the first work in her Sol LeWitt Upside Down series.

Heiner Goebbels and Alfred Harth

At last I am free
The Duo Goebbels/Harth (1975–1988), combining German composer, music-theatre director and keyboardist Heiner Goebbels and German composer, multi-media artist and saxophonist Alfred 23 Harth became famous for its adaptation of and departure from European composers, especially Hanns Eisler, implemented in a provocatively fresh manner into structured free improvisations and deploying content from areas beyond music. The duo was nicknamed the “Eisler brothers” by music critic W.Liefland. They later also experimented with different genres and sound collages, including electronic devices. The duo played in many international festivals and concerts in cities as diverse as Tel Aviv, Zagreb, West and East Berlin and South America.

Daniel Robert Hunziker

Sperre
Known for his special relationship with space and architectonic practices, Hunziker’s work uses structures and configurations to reveal visions, or fractions, of reality. At von Bartha, the artist transforms the gallery into a parcours – creating new, surprising spatial references, merging object and sculpture, and enabling opportunities for chance-encounter and discovery. more

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.