Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Bilateral Time Slicer
A biometric tracking system finds the axis of symmetry of members of the public and splits a live camera image into two slices. With each new participant time slices are recorded and pushed aside. When no one is viewing the work, the slices close and rejoin creating a procession of past recordings.

FONG QI WEI

퐁 치 웨이

‘Time is a Dimension’

The beauty of photography, in its essence, is conveyed by capturing a moment in time and freezing it out of its context. Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei, however, uses photography to show the passage of time. In his time lapse series called ‘Time is a Dimension’, Fong doesn’t use a typical long exposure trick. He captures the passing time by layering different photos of the same spot with clear edge lines of each frame. Each collage is digitally cut and created from pictures Fong takes within 2 to to 4 hours. Fong usually works at sunrise or sunset, as the light and color palettes are most varied at those times.
“The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image. Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot,” explains Fong.

GABRIEL SHALOM

wash choose peel chop rinse
This series of prints were created by capturing the editing timelines of the five movements of wash choose peel chop rinse. These images allow us to experience time as a static artifact of the musical composition process. Each slice of the simulated video frames correspond on a one-to-one basis with audible changes in the rhythmically edited video art work. In the process of making these images, the artist acts as a human agent of the video rendering codec. Each slice is hand selected to become part of the final image composite.