Gramazio Kohler Research

Up Sticks
‘Up-Sticks’ is an informal turn of phrase dating back to at least the 19th Century to express leaving your home in haste. It is thought to originate from the rough cut, unseasoned timber frame architecture of the Scottish croft designed for temporary occupation. These sticks from which the croft was partly fabricated were of great value and were taken and reused when the household moved on. Up-Sticks is an expressive timber structure that twists and curves using only spruce wood planks and beech wood dowels. No glue or nails were used to hold the planks in space; it is the hygroscopic behaviour of the dowels, which shrink and swell according to their moisture content, and their computationally defined position that lock all planks into position. Up-Sticks was assembled from large elements all prefabricated in the Robotic Fabrication Laboratory at ETH Zurich, the largest of its kind in the world.

Vincent Leroy

Illusion Lens
French Artist Vincent Leroy has proposed a geodesic installation imagined to sit atop the Roppongi Hills Mori Tower in Tokyo. The otherworldly sphere takes on a similar form to that of a spaceship, with three strong industrial legs holding up its perch. Sitting 238 meters high in the center of the rooftop’s helipad, the installation quietly overlooks Tokyo’s sprawling cityscape. Leroy accurately refers to the sphere’s kaleidoscope effect as “a sampler of the sky,” as it captures its surrounding climate and twists the image into multiple pieces. The artist designed the proposed installation as an escape from the busy streets of Tokyo, a place to contemplate and reflect in peace either alone or with loved ones.

Nicholas Stedman

After Deep Blue

ADB is a modular robot designed for tactile interactions with people. It is composed of a chain of prism-shaped robotic modules. Through the modules’ coordinated behavior, the robot writhes, wriggles and twists in response to the presence of skin and force. The robot is animated only when actively engaged by a person, otherwise it is at rest. Stroking, rubbing or grasping ADB results in it pushing back, retreating or occasionally grasping onto a body part, depending on the combination of stimulus. Participants may experience the object at their leisure. They can play with the device, exploring how it feels, and how it responds to their touch.

Genesis Belanger

Acquiesce
Genesis Belanger twists and stretches familiar objects into surreal scenarios with her stoneware, porcelain, and concrete sculptures. The Brooklyn-based artist frequently depicts detached limbs, misplaced teeth, and unusually located food in her work. One sculpture shows a mustard-topped hot dog disappearing into a handbag with a mouth-like zipper; another series dispenses rocks from dysfunctional quarter candy machines. This spring, a stoneware desk topped with flaccid pens, a tape-like tongue dispenser, and a drawer full of coping mechanisms was on view in the New Museum’s store window gallery.

MINOU LEJEUNE

Glasses with interchangeable lenses
In her work, she takes the normal out of its context, twists and play with it, to see where it ends up. She wishes to explore the limits within the relationship between fashion, wearable objects and performance. Her body related objects are made to be part of something bigger. It’s her aim to collaborate with all kinds of ‘story tellers’; art directors, photographers, fashion designers, and so on.

MINOU LEJEUNE

Minou Lejeune, born in Maastricht, the Netherlands, is graduated as a Jewellery designer at MAFAD: Maastricht Academy of Fine Arts and Design. She sees herself as a jewellery designer and prop maker. In her work, she takes the normal out of its context, twists and play with it, to see where it ends up. She wishes to explore the limits within the relationship between fashion, wearable objects and performance. Her body related objects are made to be part of something bigger. It’s her aim to collaborate with all kinds of ‘story tellers’; art directors, photographers, fashion designers, and so on.

KATHARINA TRUDZINSKI

Катарина Trudzinski
Katharina Trudzinski is a talented artist who is making a name for herself through the creation of abstract 3D collages and paintings. Dabbling in all things contemporary, Katharina Trudzinski’s work is as thought-provoking as it is artistic. Both the sculptures and paintings will inspire people to look into their depths to either figure out the meaning behind each or to simply lose themselves in the haphazard twists and turns.

MINOU LEJEUNE

Bluedenîmes
In her work, she takes the normal out of its context, twists and play with it, to see where it ends up. She wishes to explore the limits within the relationship between fashion, wearable objects and performance. Her body related objects are made to be part of something bigger. It’s her aim to collaborate with all kinds of ‘story tellers’; art directors, photographers, fashion designers, and so on.

vincent leroy

文森特·勒罗伊
北极光环
stone age
Paris-based artist vincent leroy takes movement as the motivation for his work. he prefers this over form, material, or color. instead, he focuses on adding rhythm, pauses, and creating different patterns to set and differentiate every piece. ‘stone age’ is his latest sculpture and is made of fourteen triangular mirrors that move subtly, breaking its surroundings into thin reflections of space. these mirror images deconstruct the environment allowing for different visions of it.
This sculpture situates itself between poetry and technology, generating the opportunity to test visual and physical experiences that relate to space. ‘stone age’ looks like a heavy and rigid structure, but it will surprise the user when it twists and deforms with flexibility and fluidity, creating a delicate contrast. all the movement is created using very low technology.

Bert Loeschner

БЕРТ ЛЁШНЕР
Twists and Turns Monobloc Garden Chairs