Stephen Hilyard

Waterfall
video art
FILE FESTIVAL
Waterfall presents the viewer with a single static shot of a majestic waterfall. Over the course of the piece a number of diminutive figures walk slowly into the shot on the gravel bar at the bottom of the falls. They have come to pay their respects to the waterfall, we might call them pilgrims – we might call them tourists. Their slow-motion performances appear to be a mixture of the comedic and the devout.

Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B Nguyen

Hubris Ate Nemesis
Curvy and bent wooden strips are laid out to resemble a wave in this installation in Maine, created by local designers Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B Nguyen. Kavanaugh and Nguyen designed the Hubris Atë Nemesis installation for the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA), taking cues from the from the rough waters and wind in Maine. Long, timber strips are layered across the floor and up the ceiling to fill the open-plan gallery space, with crests curling over entrances to other parts of the contemporary art gallery.

Joanie Lemercier

Brume
Brume is a series of works and installations by Joanie Lemercier, using a custom made device made of atomized water. Joanie frees his work from the screen and usual physical devices. He is using space and immateriality as a canvas, creating a mid air floating projection feeling. Thanks to this volumetric tool, he is modifying our frontal relationship with screen and allowing new interaction between the viewer and the projected image. Joanie Lemercier is still exploring the possibilities of this new medium with a series of experiences and chapters, questioning our view of reality. In his work, Joanie is researching timeless subjects like light, matter, geometry. With Brume, he is also interested in the link between water and light.

Anish Kapoor

阿尼什•卡普尔
アニッシュ·カプーア
АНИШ КАПУР
Descension
A pool of dark water swirls in a terrifying spiral, never stopping, never emitting light. It looks black and bottomless. It is the whirlpool to end all whirlpools – a spooky mixture of the vortex that sucked down the Pequod and an illustration from Stephen Hawking’s latest work on black holes. Yet this awe-inspiring phenomenon is an exhibit in an art gallery – the latest sublime spectacle from Anish Kapoor.