Hussein Chalayan

フセイン·チャラヤン
ЧАЛАЯН
후세인 샬 라얀
Intel connected accessories

Designer Hussein Chalayan partnered with Intel to bring wearable tech to his spring/summer 2017 fashion week show. Five models walked the runway alongside visual projections that showed their stress levels on the walls. All of it was made possible by vital information sent through the wearable tech they sported on the runway.

Wan Tseng

Wisp
Erotic Wearable Technology

Richard Nicoll

Fiber Optic Dress
At the intersection of fashion and digital innovation comes wearable tech. Giving analog clothing and accessories a futuristic upgrade, it promises to completely redefine their form and function. One of the most stunning examples of the tech-chic trend is a headline-making dress dubbed the “jellyfish.” Created by designer Richard Nicoll, it appeared to float down the runway at London Fashion Week exuding the same phosphorescent glow of the eerily gorgeous sea creatures that inspired it. (Except his dress used strings of fiber optics—no stinging tentacles here!)

DI MAINSTONE AND TIM MURRAY-BROWNE

Serendiptichord

The result of a cross-disciplinary investigation spanning fashion, technology, music and dance, the Serendiptichord is a wearable musical instrument that invites the user (or movician) to explore a soundscape through touch and movement. This curious device is housed in a bespoke box and viewed as part of a performance. Unpacked and explored on and around the body, the Serendiptichord only reveals its full potential through the intrepid curiosity of its wearer. Adhering to the body like an extended limb, this instrument is best described as choreophonic prosthetic. Referencing the architectural silhouette of a musical instrument and the soft fabrication of fashion and upholstery, it is designed to entice the movician to explore its surface through touch, physical manipulation and expressive movement. Although this acoustic device can be mastered alone, it also holds subtle openings for group interaction.

Lesia Trubat

Electronic Traces
E-TRACES, memories of dance
The shoes are based on the clone of Lilypad Arduino technology, which is designed for sewing into wearables. It appears that 3 force sensitive resistors are used as analog pressure sensors, measuring the force applied on the ground by the dancer’s feet.

CLIVE VAN HEERDEN AND JACK MAMA

Skin Sucka

A project conceived with Clive van Heerden, Jack Mama (Philips Design Probes) and Bart Hess, Skinsucka explores a vision of our nano technology future whereby bio technology and robotics come together to question our attitudes of a synthetic future. Skinsucka reveals a future where microbal robots live in our shared spaces and autonomously they will undertake menial tasks such as cleaning our homes by eating the dirt. ‘Skinsuckas’ clean the skin, removing the vestiges of make up and providing the remedies to combat the excesses of the night before They swarm over the body extruding metabolized household dirt, dressing the body in a daily ritual of real time, customized manufacture – yesterday’s discarded clothing ready for recycling.” Clive and Jack’s work has consistently brought very diverse skills together in new innovation processes. In the late 1990’s they took designers and other creative skills into Philips Research labs in the Redhill, London and New York and created a specialist studio in London to develop the skills, materials and technologies for a host of Wearable Electronic business propositions in the areas of electronic apparel, conductive textiles, physical gaming, medical monitoring and entertainment.

ANOUK WIPPRECHT AND ADUEN DARRIBA

Smoke Dress
Fellow designer, Valerie Lamontagne, writes: “SMOKE DRESS is a collaboration between fashiontech designer Anouk Wipprecht [NL] and technologist Aduen Darriba [NL]. The dress is a wireless and wearable tangible couture “smoke screen” imbued with the ability to suddenly visually obliterate itself through the excretion of a cloud of smoke. Ambient clouds of smoke are created when the dress detects a visitor approaching, thus camouflaging itself within it’s own materiality. The SMOKE DRESS, with its loose net of metallic threads and electrical wire, works at the scale of the magical illusionists trick, permitting a hypothetical magician’s assistant to perform her own disappearing act.

vivian xu

ELECTRIC SKIN

The Electric Skin explores the possibility of creating a wearable that extends the functionality of the skin to sense electromagnetic fields (mostly within the radio spectrum) and translate that information into touch sensation. The wearable consists of two main functional parts: 1) A matrix of omnidirectional antennas that act as sensors and probes and 2) corresponding electrodes that stimulate the skin of the wearer. Through this artificial “skin” or “exoskeleton”, the wearable changes our experience, perception, and understanding of space and movement, and in doing so, our interactions. The project speculates on the possible co-evolution of man and technology and draws attention to the role of environmental influence on our own bodily development and behavior.

MOUTH CTRLER

The project developed in collaboration with experts from different scientific and creative fields: Dr.Trevor Coward,Dr.Shama Rahman,Nuala Clooney,Matteo Rossetti
A collaboration with designer: Luca Alessandrini and Dr. Michelle Korda
Mouth CTRLer is a transdisciplinary project combining scientific findings about the sensing and sensory capabilities of the oral cavity with prosthetics and interactive technologies. It investigates tangible technological possibilities for human enhancement inside the mouth in the form of wearable prototypes.

alexander mcqueen

الكسندر ماكوين
亚历山大·麦昆
알렉산더 맥퀸
אלכסנדר מקווין
アレキサンダーマックイーン
Александра Маккуина
Android Couture

Presented on the cusp of the new millennium, Alexander McQueen’s Autumn/Winter 1999 collection for famed French fashion house Givenchy captured the new fascination with personalized digital technology in popular culture. At the culmination of the show, two models appeared outfitted in molded Perspex bodices studded with flashing LED lights and glowing leggings patterned like computer chips. The creation of a digital aesthetic and its intimate application to the body—an android-like amalgamation of the physical and digital—anticipated the “wearables” trend and the formation of the digital self. Known for his exquisite tailoring, meticulous detailing, and ambitious collections, McQueen also represented one of the remaining visionaries of haute couture extravagance.

HANNAH SOUKUP

Insides Evening Cape
Hannah Soukup brings a multidimensional approach to apparel design by combining traditional and unconventional techniques using innovative materials and technologies to transform ideas into provocative, and intriguing wearable experiences. She is a futuristic thinker and passionate ideator with her process deeply rooted in material research and experimentation, evolving ideas through draping and sculpting on the body to bring to life intimate interactions with the garments and realities.

PETER MOVRIN

Wearable Sculpture
He designs with meticulous attention to detail and longing for newness. Leather and wool are still his favourite materials. To get the effect of surprise he juxtaposes these two traditional materials with others, perhaps not typically associated with the textile industry. An important part of his design process is treating natural and synthetic fabrics with various methods, using heat, chemicals or other techniques, thus combining innovation and tradition.

PAULINE VAN DONGEN

wearable solar

There is nothing natural in nature; technology makes our humanness giving form to our surroundings. The human habitat reveals a techno-morphed structure that can no longer be hidden behind the vestiges of a natural world: technology has to be naturalized. Pauline van Dongen researches the body in a technologically textured space. After graduating from ArtEZ, Academy of the Arts in Arnhem, the Netherlands, she started her own womenswear label in 2010. Pauline operates a meticulous research of the behaviour of experimental and high-tech materials, combining new technologies with traditional techniques to constantly renovate craftsmanship. Working closely with companies from the field of science and innovation, Pauline aims to merge fashion and technology giving life to scientific creations.

Amy Karle

Internal Collection
FILE SAO PAULO 2017
Internal Collection
Switching up conventions about the body and beauty, the selections from her “Internal Collection” showing at FILE represent internal anatomy in external wearable form. Merging anatomy, fashion, and technology, each piece is created by hand and digital manufacturing technologies. By depicting designs inspired by anatomy, this work communicates that, when we share our likeness and what is going on inside of us, an opportunity is offered for finding beauty within ourselves and connection with others.

KRZYSZTOF WODICZKO

Dis-Armor Project

Dis-Armor is the newest in a series of psychocultural prosthetic equipment designed to meet the communicative need of the alienated, traumatized, and silenced residents of today’s cities. It connects contemporary research in two fields: wearable communi- cation technology and prosthetics. In doing so, it counters the dichotomy of the present explosion in communication technology and rampant cultural miscommunication. Dis-Armor offers an opportunity for indirect, mediated communication by allowing its users to speak through their backs. LCD screens, worn on the back, display live images of the wearer’s eyes transmitted from cameras installed in the helmet covering the face. A speaker positioned below the LCD screens amplifies the user’s voice. Attached to the helmet is a rearview mirror, alternatively, a rearview video camera, monitor, microphone, and headphone. These permit the user to see the face and hear the words of the spectator/interlocutor standing behind. Wireless video equipment installed in the helmet further allows two users to work in tandem, showing each other the other’s eyes and broadcasting to each the other’s voice.