Vincent Leroy

Molinoptere
The distinguishing feature of the Lanzarote Island, one of the Canary Islands, is its old windmills, or molinos. The island has limited natural sources of energy — it has no running streams and no woodland. What it does have, however, is ample wind, and for centuries Lanzarote has used wind power both to grind grain and to pump water. The island still has several remaining mills, but many of them are now in ruins. To give a second life to these abandoned structures, French artist Vincent Leroy develops a concept project titled “Molinoptere” that proposes to turn them into both art objects and wind turbines.

Daan Roosegaarde

WINDLICHT
WINDLICHT is a artwork by Roosegaarde which shows the beauty of green energy by connecting windmill blades with lines of light. Special software and tracking technology detect the windmill blades rotating at 280 kilometres per hour. Visitors can tune into radio canal WINDLICHT FM 105.3 FM to hear the stories behind the artwork. WINDLICHT creates the missing link between the Dutch and the beauty of our new landscape.

Francis Alÿs

Tornado
“Over the last decade Alÿs made recurrent trips to the highlands south of Mexico City to chase, video camera in hand, the dusty whirls whipped up by the wind in the burnt fields at the end of the dry season. Rumor has it that the genesis of this project was, in fact, a comic quid pro quo: Alÿs overheard a conversation where friends were talking about Don Quixote fighting windmills (in Spanish, molinos de viento), but he understood instead tornadoes (remolinos de viento). As in Cervantes work, Alÿs’s intent to penetrate the peaceful zone in the epicenter of the tornado illustrates a condition where ‘the vanity of the action is paired with the absolute necessity.” Félix Blume