Adriana Salazar

Doing it Myself

Adriana Salazar  Doing it Myself

source: adrianasalazar
Adriana Salazar lives and works in Bogota, Colombia. Her work as an artist has focused on the question of gestures, the relationship between subjects and objects, and the boundaries between nature and artifice. She received a BFA Honors degree from the Jorge Tadeo Lozano University of Bogota, and a Magna cum Laude Post-graduate degree in Philosophy from the Javeriana University of Bogota. With her kinetic objects and installations she has participated in art biennales, collective and solo exhibitions, such as the California-Pacific Triennial and the Manif d’art de Québec. She has also participated in several academic and curatorial projects, and has received fellowships from international artistic residencies, such as Akiyoshidai International Art Village, Japan, and Nordik Artists’ Center, Norway. In 2006 she founded La Ropería, a fashion design store that features the creations of 30 Colombian fashion designers. Adriana is also currently working as a visiting professor at the Javeriana University of Bogota, and at the Jorge Tadeo Lozano University of Bogota.
The definition of life, from the scientific point of view, states that a living thing is something that endures through time, something that changes or evolves. In this sense, the measure of a human lifespan is insufficient to grasp the whole spectrum of the living. We could say that things that are considered inanimate, such as planets or earthly rock formations, can have a life that is not captured by our perception: they are moving and changing at a very slow speed, they have an origin and a possible end ahead of them, and they outlive our fragile existence in that process.
These thoughts about the boundaries of life have been present throughout my work, firstly in a subtle manner, and later in a more direct and clearer way. I started building machines which replicated certain human gestures and actions, and which were made using simple mechanisms often meant to reveal their imperfections. These machines captured human life’s fragile condition as they performed certain tasks repeatedly, such as trying to thread a needle, trying to light a match or crying.
After these series of works, I started using mechanics to animate obsolete objects, making them move in unexpected and unnatural manners. I used old objects such as clothes, shoes or umbrellas to show how there are invisible forces operating behind all things. I then started animating dead fragments of plants, logs and taxidermy animals, which led me to consider the resemblance between plants, animals and objects embedded in the realm of inanimate things.
Encountering the inanimate in relation to human death has taken my work further, in displacing the definition of life that common sense dictates: I have also worked with gravestones, ritual objects and human remains, and have treated them with an equal consideration as I have done with any other object.
I intend to show with this that gravestones, as all human actions and definitions, somehow protect our bodies from becoming indifferent objects submitted to the natural process of decay and obsolescence. Through questioning our rituals and cultural practices we become aware of our mortality, while we realize that we are also part of a layer of dirt in the changing surface of the earth.
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source: wla-galeria
Adriana Salazar (1980) vive y trabaja en Bogotá. Es Maestra en Artes Plásticas de la Universidad Jorge Tadeo Lozano de Bogotá y Magíster en Filosofía con mención Magna cum Laude de la Universidad Javeriana de la misma ciudad. Su trabajo como artista parte de un cuestionamiento por los gestos humanos, esencialmente, la relación que existe entre sujetos y objetos, y los límites entre naturaleza y artificio. Con él, ha participado en exposiciones colectivas e individuales en diferentes museos y galerías de Europa, Asia, América del Norte y del Sur. Asímismo, ha colaborado en proyectos curatoriales y académicos, y ha sido becaria de varias residencias artísticas internacionales, tales como Akiyoshidai International Art Village en Japón, y Nordik Artists’ Center en Dale, Noruega. Fue profesora de Introducción a la Tridimensionalidad en la Universidad Javeriana de Bogotá para el programa de Pregrado en Artes Visuales. Además, trabaja como gestora de proyectos y es diseñadora de la tienda de diseño de modas La Ropería, en Bogotá.
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source: artsy
Adriana Salazar builds kinetic sculptures that perform simple human actions, such as tying a pair of shoelaces, threading a needle, or smoking a cigarette. By mimicking some of humanity’s most mundane and unconscious acts—measuring a wall or switching a light on and off—Salazar seeks to decontextualize them, rendering them meaningless and futile, to humorous effect. “It is fascinating…to see, as in a distorted mirror in front of us, what we do, but without our presence,” she says. “Just the action repeating itself over and over.” Salazar’s mechanisms perform their given tasks clumsily, suggesting the absurdity of machines replacing humans in the most basic of tasks and their ultimate failure to do so.
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source: memorial
Adriana Salazar nasceu em Bogotá, na Colômbia, em 1980. Sua obra “habita” paisagens lunares, que prescindem do humano. Ela cria esculturas cinéticas verossímeis que, embora façam movimentos que lembram ações humanas, de animais ou plantas, estão totalmente desnaturalizadas. Para o Brasil ela monta o novo “Projeto Plantas em Movimento”, que pode ser conferido em adrianasalazar.net. Para construir essa obra, Adriana esteve na rua Florêncio de Abreu, no centro de São Paulo, conhecida por seu comércio de ferramentas e ferragens. Após comprar o que precisava, foi até o Parque da Água Branca, de onde recolheu plantas mortas (secas). Pronto: A produção de “Plantas em Movimento” é simples, mas o efeito é devastador. Adriana trabalha a questão dos limites entre natureza e máquina, humano e não humano, o belo e o feio, a vida e a morte.