The End of Time

TIMELAPSE OF THE FUTURE: A Journey to the End of Time
We start in 2019 and travel exponentially through time, witnessing the future of Earth, the death of the sun, the end of all stars, proton decay, zombie galaxies, possible future civilizations, exploding black holes, the effects of dark energy, alternate universes, the final fate of the cosmos.

Ryoji Ikeda

micro | macro
micro | macro transforms Hall E in the MuseumsQuartier into an oversized world of moving images and sounds. In his immersive installation, multimedia artist Ryoji Ikeda creates a field of imagination between quantum physics, empirical experimentation and human perception. In collaboration with nuclear scientists at CERN, Ikeda has translated complex physical theories into a sensory experience. The Planck scale is used by scientists to denote extremely small lengths or time intervals. Concepts like space and time lose their meaning beyond this scale, and contemporary physics has to rely on speculative theories. And on art. Visitors to micro | macro enter a world of data, particles, light and sound that makes the extremes of the universe perceptible to the eye and ear. In the micro world we penetrate the smallest dimensions of the unrepresentable, while in the macro world we take off into cosmic expanses that allow us to experience the infinite space beyond the observable universe. In this maelstrom of data, an acoustic and visual firework bridges the gap between theoretical understanding and sensual perception.

WHITEvoid

Universe
WHITEvoid ontwierp en realiseerde de dynamische LED-installatie met de nieuwste innovatie van WHITEvoid’s huismerk Kinetic Lights: de videodriehoeken met HD realtime streaming. De productie van het hele project werd ondersteund door het lokale L!VE Kingway-team in Beijing. De precieze kinetische bewegingen van verschillende vormen en vormen speelden de rol van een ‘acteur’ of ‘performer’ in plaats van ‘slechts een achtergrond’ te zijn (zoals meestal het geval is bij videowalls of projecties). Gecombineerd met de uitvoering van een volkskoor, stelde deze multidimensionale video-installatie artiesten in staat om in realtime op het podium te communiceren met het universum‘.

Yunchul Kim

Argos
The work Argos is a 41-channel muon particle detector. It reacts with a flash each time a muon particle emitted by the universe is detected in the air – a mechanism that is carried over to another work titled Impulse. Taking the form of a chandelier, Impulse is a work consisting of numerous cylindrical tubes that extend out like the hanging branches of a tree as clear fluid flows through them. Every time Argos detects a particle, it transmits a signal to Impulse, with the result that we can see with our own eyes the air bubbles and motion of the fluid running through the artwork.

Fuse

Ljós
Ljós (Icelandic for ‘light’) has been conceived in continuity with the research carried out by fuse* in the field of digital and performative arts, which explores the deep connection between light, space, sound and movement. In Ljós, the performer is the means that allows the viewer to access a surreal and dreamlike space, a dimension with no gravity nor time, made by sounds and images reacting and interacting in real time. A shape-changing universe, which evolves from amniotic fluid in the beginning – protecting and supporting the performer – to the setting for violent explosions and transformations later – leading her to a direct contact with ground and Earth.

Plebian Design

Patterned by Nature
Patterned by Nature was commissioned by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences for the newly built Nature Research Center in Raleigh, North Carolina. The exhibit celebrates our abstraction of nature’s infinite complexity into patterns through the scientific process, and through our perceptions. It brings to light the similarity of patterns in our universe, across all scales of space and time.

Klaus Obermaier

克劳斯奥伯迈尔
the concept of … (here and now)

In front of a giant screen, two dancers interact with a cohort of cameras… Their movements are captured by infra-red sensors and projected onto the screen, whereby their bodies become the canvas on which new images take shape. The result is a shifting kaleidoscope of strange, living, quasi-mathematical visual worlds which sometimes seem to be emanating or even escaping from the dancers’ bodies. “Who decides which movement to make: the man or the machine?” Blurring the line between the real and the virtual, Klaus Obermaier loves to subsume his performers’ bodies and physicality in a disconcerting digital universe. With his latest creation, the choreographer/artist has taken a bold new step. He has constructed a system of projectors and infra-red sensor-cameras, trained upon the movements of two dancers. The performers thus find themselves thrown headlong into a living, moving graphical universe: their movements are projected onto the screen, but at the same time their bodies are illuminated by more projected images. This is a true artistic performance, pushing well beyond the frontiers of a standard dance recital, or even a contemporary dance show. A corporeal, temporal performance. A choreography which makes subtle use of its raw materials, deftly combining lights, video, perspectives and the real-time power of bodily movement.

Ouchhh

SAY SUPERSTRINGS

Ouchhh will take inspiration from the notes that exist in the universe while micro-strings vibrate (Subatomic Particles) in real time and define the melodies created by the notes as “Matter” and symphonies of these melodies as “Universe”. With dastrio, Ouchhh will take 11 dimensions in abstract directions in super grade gravity theory and move them beyond space in real time. The dimensions captured intuitively in living space will constantly change and turn into reality.

dastrio:
Bernhard Metz – Violin
Manuel Von Der Nahmer – Violoncello
Suyang Kim – Piano

J. MAYER H. und Partner, Architekten

于爾根·邁爾
يورغن ماير
위르겐 마이어
יורגן מאייר
ユルゲン・マイヤー
Юрген Майер
Danfoss Universe Science Park

Jürgen Mayer H. prévoit d’étendre «Danfoss Universe», un parc d’aventures scientifiques et technologiques à Nordborg, au Danemark, près du siège de Danfoss au printemps 2007. Plusieurs bâtiments d’extension sont en cours de construction sur le site de 5,5 ha, dont un restaurant et un centre d’expositions et de conférences (total 1400 m2). Ces bâtiments, d’une apparence exceptionnelle, mettent en valeur l’idée de base pédagogique et innovante de Danfoss Universe et visent à susciter l’intérêt pour la nature et la science.

Guillaume Marmin

TIMÉE
In roughly 360BC, Plato shared his dialogue Timaeus, in which he imagined the universe as a geocentric system, including a concept called Music of the Spheres where each planet had its own sonic tone based on its unique orbital revolution. The entire system was divided into an octave, a fifth, a fourth, and tone, and as all the planets revolved around the Earth, the solar system would comprise a perfect musical score.

superbien studio

siderea
We presented our interpretation of a gravitational anomaly, entitled Siderea, an unknown force at the outer fringes of the Universe, in the centre of the Great Attractor. Beyond anything our eyes or our minds are capable of imagining and using geometric and scientific coordinates to create a palpable world to scale, we wanted to tell a deeply immersive tale exploring the emotions that the discovery of such a stellar phenomenon might rouse. Freely inspired by the explorations and incredible advances made in astronomy, we transformed the venue into the point of observation of this extraordinary celestial body, in the literal sense of the term.

Andrew Schneider

YOUARENOWHERE
Conjuring a futuristic sort of shamanism, Andrew Schneider’s YOUARENOWHERE experiments with the virtues of sensory overload via quantum mechanics, parallel universes, and the “Missed Connections” board on Craigslist. Battling glitchy transmissions, crackling microphones, and lighting instruments falling from the sky, one guy on a mission and a tricked-out interactive new-media landscape merge to transform physical space, warp linear time, and short-circuit preconceived notions of what it means to be here now.

Woo Jung Chun

Library
The library is a potent metaphor for knowledge that evokes images of organization, study, research and discovery. Libraries build relationships and connections and act as catalysts or laboratories for creative thoughts. Chun’s project is inspired in part by Jorge Luis Borges’ celebrated text, ‘The Library of Babel’ that compares the library to the universe with the grand idea that it is a repository for all knowledge and every individual truth. The universe is governed by an order that we can perceive only partially yet it evokes ideas of the infinite and the eternal – like matter it is neither created nor destroyed – it just is.

MARIKO MORI

ماریکو موری
森万里子
Мори, Марико
Tom Na H-Iu

Tom Na H-iu is a three-dimensional glass work almost 3 meters in height. It is networked to the Super Kamiokande neutrino observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, enabling it to interact and respond when the observatory captures a neutrino. On detecting a neutrino, such as those emitted by stars in our galaxy as they die in supernova explosions[…] Tom Na H-iu represents a modern standing stone that conveys the death of a star, meanwhile hinting at the birth that follows – as if to suggest to the viewer that our existence is in resonance with the universe. When we view this work that emits peaceful light amidst darkness, we can project ourselves into the darkness and gain a sense that we are standing quietly in the flow of eternal time.

Alexander Ekman

Play
Invited to the Palais Garnier for the first time, the choreographer Alexander Ekman lived a dream: working with the dancers of the Paris Opera Ballet! In order to plunge them into the universe of his piece, he invited them to play. After all, isn’t dance also entertainment, amusement, practice, exercise and manipulation? Here, play is everything and everywhere. From the props to the sets. For, as the choreographer repeats, play makes us happy; one should never stop being a child. In the Massenet and Blanchine studios, photographer Anne Deniau focusses on certain emblematic props from this production, whilst playwright Nicolas Doutey reflects upon these new visual compositions.

Robert Wilson

بوب ويلسون
鲍伯·威尔逊
בוב וילסון
ロバート·ウィルソン
밥 윌슨
БОБ УИЛСОН
Arvo Pärt
Adam’s Passion
Estonian Arvo Pärt is one of the three most performed contemporary composers worldwide. His music has been described as contemplative, sacred, and timeless. “Time for us is the time of our own lives. It is temporary. What is timeless is the time of eternal life. Like the sun, we cannot look at these two directly, but my intuition tells me that the human soul is connected to both of them—time and eternity,” says Pärt. Much like Robert Wilson’s own universe, where time and space are the basic architecture of everything, it is as if these two artists have been waiting to collaborate with one another! ADAM’S PASSION will be a journey into the worlds of sound, light, visual art and performance. It will celebrate Arvo Pärt’s 80th birthday—all in a spectacular venue, the Noblessner Foundry, a vast, old industrial building by Tallinn’s harbo

Laurie Spiegel

the expanding universe
The Expanding Universe is the classic 1980 debut album by composer and computer music pioneer Laurie Spiegel. The pieces comprising The Expanding Universe combine slowly evolving textures with the emotional richness of intricate counterpoint, harmony, and complex rhythms (John Fahey and J. S. Bach are both cited as major influences in the original cover’s notes), all built of electronic sounds. These works, often grouped with those of Terry Riley, Phil Glass, Steve Reich, differ in their much shorter, clear forms. Composed and realized between 1974 and 1977 on the GROOVE system developed by Max Mathews and F.R. Moore at Bell Laboratories, the pieces on this album were far ahead of their time both in musical content and in how they were made.

CERN

Globe of Science and Innovation
History of the universe
Did you know that the matter in your body is billions of years old?

According to most astrophysicists, all the matter found in the universe today — including the matter in people, plants, animals, the earth, stars, and galaxies — was created at the very first moment of time, thought to be about 13 billion years ago.
The universe began, scientists believe, with every speck of its energy jammed into a very tiny point. This extremely dense point exploded with unimaginable force, creating matter and propelling it outward to make the billions of galaxies of our vast universe. Astrophysicists dubbed this titanic explosion the Big Bang.
The Big Bang was like no explosion you might witness on earth today. For instance, a hydrogen bomb explosion, whose center registers approximately 100 million degrees Celsius, moves through the air at about 300 meters per second. In contrast, cosmologists believe the Big Bang flung energy in all directions at the speed of light (300,000,000 meters per second, a million times faster than the H-bomb) and estimate that the temperature of the entire universe was 1000 trillion degrees Celsius at just a tiny fraction of a second after the explosion. Even the cores of the hottest stars in today’s universe are much cooler than that.
There’s another important quality of the Big Bang that makes it unique. While an explosion of a man-made bomb expands through air, the Big Bang did not expand through anything. That’s because there was no space to expand through at the beginning of time. Rather, physicists believe the Big Bang created and stretched space itself, expanding the universe.

EIJA-LIISA AHTILA

Vaakasuora-Horizontal
The artwork shows a 11-metre tall spruce, with its branches swaying in the wind, filmed at full scale in six parts. The soundscape consists of the sound of the wind, the creaking of the trunk and birdsong. The method of display is, however, unexpected: it is shown in a horizontal position.Vaakasuora-Horizontal is a portrait of a spruce. It is an interpretation of the essence of the spruce, and the difficulty of observing and recording the life of a spruce. How can one capture the very being of a spruce? Each viewer will see the reality differently and each one of them will see the spruce trough glasses tinted by their personal memories and experiences. The artist has wanted to use this artwork to represent the German biologist Jakob von Uexküell’s idea of the parallel and concurrent existence of time and spatial worlds. The work of art, on the other hand, also moves the focus from the human being as the centre of the universe to the greatness of nature; people play a minor part in the greater picture.

MARCIO AMBROSIO

Oups!
Oups!
FILE SAO PAULO 2007
Capturing and tracking camera, animated image integration and projection
Created in 2007. Oups! was born from the wish to mix new technologies and classic animation in a playful and artistic way. Each animated sequence has a script and the visitor interacts and transforms himself into an actor of this story.
When the visitor enters in a defined space, a camera records his image and projects it on a screen in front (like a mirror) in real size and time. The visitor sees himself integrated to an animation setting that follow his movements. He founds himself immersed in a creative universe of images and sounds. The animation sequences that feed this universe are stored in a video library, new animations may be added to enrich the project. Oups! universe is playful and naive, accessible to all publics and ages.
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