Squarepusher

Nervelevers
if “Nervelevers” is anything to go by, Squarepusher’s upcoming album, Be Up A Hello, will be the closest thing we’ve had to vintage Squarepusher in years. This will be welcome news for many fans. Much like the best of Squarepusher’s catalogue, there’s a brilliant live quality to “Nervelevers.” His music often doesn’t sound like a single producer staring into a computer, but more like an incredibly tight jazz band, totally in sync. The track might not feature his virtuosic bass playing, but you can picture him slapping his bass guitar during its frantic acid line. You’re pulled through a chaotic wormhole, with only a brief respite when the glitched jungle drums break down to an almost hip-hop stagger. It’s fast, unpredictable, and most importantly, fun. Only a handful of artists can make music this complex feel like such a good time.

IAN HOBSON

spiralous wormhole
UK based light artist Ian Hobson, who humorously and humbly calls his work “Waving Torches at Things”

STARGATE

Roland Emmerich
In 1994, Egyptologist and linguist Daniel Jackson, Ph.D., is invited by Catherine Langford to translate Egyptian hieroglyphs on cover stones, also known as casing stones, that her father had unearthed in Giza, Egypt, in 1928. Jackson is taken to a U.S. Air Force installation and told by its commander, Special Operations Colonel Jack O’Neil, that the project is classified information. Jackson determines that the hieroglyphs refer to a “stargate” which uses constellations as spatial coordinates. On this revelation, Jackson is shown that the base has this Stargate, also discovered by Langford’s father. They use Jackson’s coordinates to align the Stargate’s metal ring with markings along its outside, and once all seven are locked in, a wormhole opens, connecting the Stargate with a distant planet. Jackson joins O’Neil and his team, consisting of Reilly, Porro, Freeman, Brown, Ferretti, and Kawalsky, as they pass through the wormhole.
CINEMA

ÉTIENNE ROCHEFORT

WORMHOLE
“But without a narrative framework, the spectator struggles to grant the wormhole a concrete existence. WormHole is actually made up of two different parts. In performing arts, the quick passage from one universe to another is within everyone’s reach. Not to mention the cinema … On the other hand, its dramaturgical raison d’etre must be identifiable within the show, rather than in a wormhole that no one has yet been able to prove. What if in Wormhole the passage from a space odyssey to a shared apartment was made by a path called intermission? Authenticated and tested for centuries, this device would make it possible to add something concrete to all the choreographic hypotheses mentioned.” Thomas Hahn