PETRA CORTRIGHT

HELL_TREE

Petra Cortright est une artiste Internet qui réalise des vidéos, des animations gif et des images fixes. Sa page d’accueil ressemble à une page html datée avec un tas de smileys et une liste de son travail: travail authentique, expérimental et nostalgique avec beaucoup de paillettes, d’étincelles, de collages et de personnages faisant des images. Tout au long du site Web, il y a des animations de souris amusantes, par exemple des étincelles qui suivent votre pointeur lorsque vous vous déplacez sur l’écran. Une autre chose intéressante est un cadre qui est attaché à votre pointeur afin que vous puissiez placer le cadre sur un portrait. Cortright a étudié à la Parsons School of Design de New York et au California College of the Arts de San Francisco. Aujourd’hui, elle vit et travaille en Californie. Elle a exposé à l’international dans des galeries telles que Gloria Maria Gallery (Milan) et Spencer Brownston (New York) entre autres. Récemment, Cortright a exposé avec sa série SO WET à la Preteen Gallery de Mexico.

Thomas Thwaites GoatMan

GoatMan

J’ai essayé de devenir une chèvre pour échapper à l’angoisse inhérente au fait d’être un humain. Le projet est devenu une exploration de la façon dont la technologie moderne peut nous amener à réaliser un ancien rêve humain: prendre les caractéristiques d’autres animaux. Mais au lieu de la férocité d’un ours, ou de la perspective d’un oiseau, la caractéristique la plus utile dans la vie moderne est autre chose; être présent dans le moment peut-être.
Quoi qu’il en soit, je me suis retrouvé dans les Alpes, sur quatre pattes, dans une ferme caprine, avec un rumen prothétique attaché à ma poitrine, mangeant de l’herbe et devenant une chèvre.

Michele Spanghero

Dià
Dià (from greek διά, through) is a sculpture installed on a piece of no man’s land on the top of mount Pal Piccolo on the border between Italy and Austria, where World War I was fought. The double-trumpet shaped sculpture symbolically connects, both visually and acoustically, the first lines’ trenches. Two arched doors, that refer to the entrance of the shelters and trenches, turn into cavities to listen or observe the surrounding landscape. The work, conceived as a symbolic link between the two fronts, combines the dimensions of silence and sound: dià is indeed a device that invites audience to interact with the two cavities as a megaphone or a peephole, to start an intimate dialogue through the sculpture.

Kino

MIT Media Lab, Stanford University
This work explores a dynamic future where the accessories we wear are no longer static, but are instead mobile, living objects on the body. Engineered with the functionality of miniaturized robotics, this “living” jewelry roams on unmodified clothing, changing location and reconfiguring appearance according to social context and enabling multitude presentations of self. With the addition of sensor devices, they transition into active devices which can react to environmental conditions. They can also be paired with existing mobile devices to become personalized on-body assistants to help complete tasks. Attached to garments, they generate shape-changing clothing and kinetic pattern designs–creating a new, dynamic fashion.
It is our vision that in the future, these robots will be miniaturized to the extent that they can be seamlessly integrated into existing practices of body ornamentation. With the addition of kinetic capabilities, traditionally static jewelry and accessories will start displaying life-like qualities, learning, shifting, and reconfiguring to the needs and preferences of the wearer, also assisting in fluid presentation of self. We envision a new class of future wearables that possess hybrid qualities of the living and the crafted, creating a new on-body ecology for human-wearable symbiosis.

KAZUHIRO YAMANAKA

sound cloud
London-based designer kazuhiro yamanaka has created the ‘sound cloud’ a light-emitting quantum glass speaker system installation for saazs ‘a glass house’ program. the structure is composed of five interactive monolithic glass panels, formed with the intention of modelling the integration of innovative glass within architecture and design. the sound and light radiating from ‘sound cloud’ shift in unison, their synchronization may be altered by the viewer as they adjust their aural and visual experience by means of a touch-screen controller.
yamanaka aspired for the visitors to ‘be able to hear the sound move from one to another, jumping back and forth and echoing from the panels.’
a sound module is attached to each panel. as it vibrates,the three layers of glass move at a frequency, which creates optimum sound quality. the sound for the installation was developed by the france-based sound designer, gling-glang. yamanaka and gling-glang devised a soundscape by which ‘sound cloud’ visitors were able to sense the sculptural construction of the music in walking through the installation’s glass-paneled pathway.
the glass is outfitted with a light-emitting system known as ‘LED in glass’, invented by quantum glass. through this technology, the panels become a source of light. the ‘sound cloud’ is illuminated as the LED bars are fitted around the edge of the panel in order to direct beams of light through the edge of the extra clear glass sheet. as a result, light refraction occurs from the front side by means of a white enamel screen print on the opposite side.
yamanaka chose to slightly obscure the brightness of the glass sound system by creating a thin layer from millions of light dots, culminating in a cloud-like shape.

Cod.Act

Sound City
Suspended from the ceiling by two springs and equipped with an oscillating weight fixed inside its body, a Sound City loudspeaker shakes in a disorderly manner in space. The music it plays reacts directly to the movements as if the musicians were inside the loudspeaker and trying in vain to adapt their playing to the turbulences. The originality of the movements comes from the pulsations and interferences produced by the interaction of two coupled harmonic oscillators (the spring and the pendulum) not having the same natural frequency. The two pneumatic jacks to which the springs are attached control the amplitude of the swings.

CyberMotion Simulator

Max-Planck-Institut

The CMS consists of an industrial robot arm with six independent axes, extended with an L-shaped cabin axis. The seventh axis allows for varying the orientation of the cabin with respect to the robot arm by changing the location of the cabin’s attachment point from behind the seat to under the seat, or any intermediate position. Recently, the CMS has been further extended with a linear axis of ten meters. The resulting eight degrees-of-freedom (DOF) provide an exceptionally large workspace. Several extreme motions and positions can be achieved, such as large lateral/longitudinal motions, sustained centrifugal motions, infinite head-centered rotation, and up-side-down motions.

AZUMA MAKOTO

あずままこと
אזאמה מקוטו
아즈마 마코토
Адзума Макото
Water and Bonsai

In his continued forays into experimental botany that blur the lines between art and science, artist Makoto Azuma (previously) has reimagined the bonsai tree, one of the oldest Japanese artforms. This latest work titled Water and Bonsai, began with a dead branch from a juniper tree which was carefully attached to java moss meant to simulate the form of leaves. The entire piece was then submerged into a modified hydroponic environment similar to some of his earlier aquatic plantscapes replete with LEDs, a filtration system, and C02 emissions that encourage photosynthesis.
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Marnix de Nijs

Accelerator

Marnix de Nijs’ installation examines the precarious balance of machine, image and body in time and the effects that accelerated forces of gravity have on today’s urban citizenry. Participants sit in a racing car seat attached to a motorized revolving arm and focus on a video projection which is simultaneously circulating with them.

ARNE QUINZE

Арне Куинз
Chaos Life
The composition of a Chaos artwork started as a self-portrait; the representation of what’s going on in his head. But soon a shift occurred towards an enduring research on the definition of chaos in society. Often these artworks are filled with a mass of small wooden sticks attached to each other, looking enormously chaotic. “There’s no chaos, only structure” is a tagline in some of his work expressing his inner self and how he describes his thoughts. To him there is no chaos, everything is structured even in the chaos you find structure. There’s no such thing as chaos in Quinze’s world or at least not in the sense of how society defines chaos. Chaos does exist, as a form of structure. Chaos is irretrievably linked with life. In life everything is a matter of rhythm. Something without a rigid structure is part of the organic order in life.