Emmanuel Van Der Auwera

Videosculpture XXI
Van der Auwera’s VideoSculptures take a new position to explore the intersections of digital and physical life and how the filtering of images in production, dissemination, and digestion alter both individual perception and consensual experience. Using the screen as sculptural material, these works break images out of the frame in a low-tech manner. They start with an act of destruction as the artist literally takes a knife to a screen to carve away physical layers. Unbeknown to most, these layers are filters that are adhered to every LCD screen. Without the mediation of these filters, images become impossible to see with the naked eye and white noise fills the space.

manuel rossner

surprisingly this rather works
“Surprisingly This Rather Works” is a spatial intervention at ST. AGNES / KÖNIG GALERIE and at the same time a virtual extension of its exterior. The entire gallery is transformed into a gaming environment inspired by the 1990s game show “American Gladiators” and so-called gyms that are used for cutting-edge research in artificial intelligence by companies such as Open AI in San Francisco.
The visitor turns into an avatar and interacts with objects that are part of a parcours. These objects broaden the perspective on what painting and sculpture can be in the digital realm.

Amy Karle

Internal Collection yellow silk dress based on ligaments
Merging anatomy, fashion, and technology, each piece is created by hand and digital manufacturing technologies. By depicting designs inspired by anatomy, this work communicates that, when we share our likeness and what is going on inside of us, an opportunity is offered for finding beauty within ourselves and connection with others.

OLIVER TESSMANN

Blurring structure
Oliver Tessmann is an Assistant Professor (tenure track) in the School of Architecture and the Built Environment, KTH Stockholm. His teaching and research in the Architectural Technology Group revolves around computational design and digital manufacturing in architecture.

Amy Karle

Internal Collection
FILE SAO PAULO 2017
Internal Collection
Switching up conventions about the body and beauty, the selections from her “Internal Collection” showing at FILE represent internal anatomy in external wearable form. Merging anatomy, fashion, and technology, each piece is created by hand and digital manufacturing technologies. By depicting designs inspired by anatomy, this work communicates that, when we share our likeness and what is going on inside of us, an opportunity is offered for finding beauty within ourselves and connection with others.

Ken Kelleher

Bigfoot
While variety in composition and form is evident, Kelleher further experiments with material and color. Digital rendering techniques offer endless iterative opportunities. Multiple shifts in material, especially when applied to a singular form, allow for a variety of interpretations. Kelleher explains: ‘The visual expression I try to achieve is one that is open to interpretation. In one piece someone may see something playful, or whimsical, in another it may feel menacing.’

FONG QI WEI

Singapur Zeitgemälde
“In dieser Reihe animierter Kunstwerke, bei denen es sich im Wesentlichen um verlangsamte Versionen der Serie Time in Motion handelt, lade ich Sie ein, den Verlauf von Momenten durch eine Landschaft zu erleben. Vielleicht verstehen wir, dass, obwohl alle Momente vergänglich sind, alle Momente gleichermaßen unseres Respekts würdig sind, weil sie Teile eines größeren Ganzen sind. Jede Zeitschleife wird manuell erstellt. Ich habe jeden Moment eines Sonnenuntergangs oder Sonnenaufgangs mit einer Digitalkamera festgehalten und diese Momente manuell in Time Paintings eingefügt. Schließlich wurden verschiedene aufeinanderfolgende Zeitbilder zusammengestellt, um ein Bewegungsgefühl zu erzeugen, das in einigen Werken kaum wahrnehmbar ist, wie Wolken, die über einen Himmel zeihen.” Fong Qi Wei

Mediated Matter Group

Fiberbots
FIBERBOTS is a digital fabrication platform fusing cooperative robotic manufacturing with abilities to generate highly sophisticated material architectures. The platform can enable design and digital fabrication of large-scale structures with high spatial resolution leveraging mobile fabrication nodes, or robotic ‘agents’, designed to tune the material make-up of the structure being constructed on the fly as informed by their environment.

Jonas Pequeno

Foley
Huxley-Parlour gallery presents a solo exhibition of new audiovisual and installation works by the London-based artist Jonas Pequeno. Comprising of three works, a kinetic sound installation Foley, a CGI video Ocean Scene Composite and a photographing print, and the act of appearing, the exhibition considers incongruity in digital fictional constructs. The title of the exhibition, /ˈfəʊli/, is a phonetic transcription of the word foley, a film-making technique used to manually mimic everyday sound effects in post-production when props do not acoustically match their real life counterparts. Influenced by the concept of foley, Pequeno’s work features an audiovisual installation that incorporates microphones and balloons swayed by a fan, replicating the sound of crashing ocean waves.

FONG QI WEI

Flypast Sunset
“In this series of animated artworks, which are essentially slowed down versions of the series Time in Motion, I invite you to experience the passage of moments across a landscape. Perhaps understanding that even though all moments are transient, all moments are equally worthy of our respect because they are parts of a larger whole. Each Time Loop is made manually. I captured every moment across a sunset or sunrise using a digital camera, and manually stitched these moments into Time Paintings. Finally, different sequential time paintings were put together to create a sense of motion  almost imperceptible in some of the works, in the manner of clouds drifting across a sky.” Fong Qi Wei

Adam Ferriss

Glitch art
Finding his own niche between new media arts and conceptualism, Adam Ferriss creates unique digital coding that manipulates, distorts, and engineers images into psychedelic terrains. At times, his technicolor abstractions feel organic despite their technological roots – an ambiguous craft born of the RGB Tricolor separation process and pixel sorting algorithms he so carefully employs. Using these “procedural mechanisms,” Ferriss initiates iterative changes in light and pixel structure of his given source material – creating a literally infinite array of compositional possibilities that grapple with human perception during an era of ubiquitous manufacture.

STEPHEN SHAHEEN

Стивена Шахина
스티븐 샤힌
斯蒂芬·沙欣
ستيفن شاهين
eve

Stephen Shaheen is a Brooklyn-based artist whose work explores the porous borders between art, design and architecture. His work spans both manual and digital processes, and employs materials as diverse as repurposed found objects, marble, and recycled denim fiber.

LARISSA HAILY

Aguado
Argentinian Larissa Haily Aguado is collaging in the digital age. Still assembling manually from found materials, the trained artist and designer creates enchanting compositions through the the mixing of various motifs, fused with surrealism and an unmistakable humorous quality that makes you stop and think. These dreamlike collages mix inanimate objects, nature, fashion and animals, with other seemingly random elements. However, they may not be so random.

MARTIN KALTENBRUNNER

reactable
file festival

The ReacTable is a collaborative electronic music instrument with a tabletop tangible multi-touch interface. Several simultaneous performers share complete control over the instrument by moving and rotating physical objects on a luminous round table surface. By moving and relating these objects, representing components of a classic modular synthesizer, users can create complex and dynamic sonic topologies, with generators, fi lters and modulators, in a kind of tangible modular synthesizer or graspable fl ow-controlled programming language. The instrument was developed by a team of digital luthiers under the direction of Dr. Sergi Jordà. The “Interactive Sonic Systems” team works in the Music Technology Group within the Audiovisual Institute at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. Its main activities concentrate on the design of new musical interfaces, such as tangible musical instruments and musical applications for mobile devices. The reactable intends to be: collaborative: several performers (locally or remotely), intuitive: zero manual, zero instructions, sonically challenging and interesting, earnable and masterable (even for children), suitable for novices (installations) and advanced electronic musicians (concerts). The reactable hardware is based on a translucent, round multi-touch surface. A camera situated beneath the table continuously analyzes the surface, tracking the player’s fi ngertips and the nature, position and orientation of physical objects that are distributed on its surface. These objects represent the components of a classic modular synthesizer. The players interact by moving these objects, changing their distance, orientation and the relation to each other. These actions directly control the topological structure and parameters of the sound synthesizer. A projector, also from underneath the table, draws dynamic animations on its surface, providing a visual feedback of the state, the activity and the main characteristics of the sounds produced by the audio synthesizer.

URS FISCHER

Урс Фишер
nomadic art tent
The nomadic sculpture that Urs Fischer created for Station to Station is something of a steamy interior dreamscape, a glittery, shimmering vision that hypnotizes with lights and textures that both welcome and disorient. In the center of the piece is a plush Hasten’s bed on which viewers lie surrounded on all sides by mirrors and cloud-like smoke. A disco ball rotates above. Is this a place for disco naps? Or is it a glamorous fantasy of decadence and visual riches? Spend some time, look at yourself in the many reflective surfaces, and feel the bedding against your skin and decide for yourself. Dreamy as it is, this space is grounded in the real world and governed by the laws of physics. This place seems like a fantasy, but it is entirely real. As one critic noted of an earlier Fischer work:In a world increasingly defined by virtual realities and digital imaging, is the creative mastery of hand manufacture merely a quaint artistic throwback — nostalgia for a lost cultural past? Is this sculpture a memorial? Given today’s ubiquitous special effects wizardry, shouldn’t art clasp technology to its bosom? There’s nothing virtual about the softness of the bed, nothing digital about the gleam of those lights or the mist surrounding you. Take off your shoes. Climb inside. This is real life.