Claudio Correa

Libertad, Igualdad, Fatalidad
La muestra Libertad, Igualdad, Fatalidad, con curatoría del historiador del arte Sebastián Vidal, resignifica el ideario de la Revolución Francesa por medio de versiones adaptadas del clásico himno La Marsellesa, para traernos a la época actual y evidenciar el estado de la crisis migratoria. La instalación reproduce a escala un barco similar al de los primeros inmigrantes que llegaron a Chile en el siglo XIX; colonos europeos en su mayoría, quienes poblaron principalmente el sur del país, protegidos por planes estatales de emprendimiento, modernización y transformación cultural y racial.

ARNE SVENSON

阿恩史云逊
Арне Свенсон
THE NEIGHBORS

Arne Svenson is self taught as a photographer, but his sensibility was largely formed by his early work as a therapist/educator working with severely disabled children. His vision embraces the unusual, quirky individuality of people and places and represents them with beauty, clarity and reverence. He creates most of his work within the controlled environment of the studio, and even when he ventures out to record the world, his vision is informed by the interior quality of his studio. Svenson works serially and obsessively on discrete projects which vary greatly, yet share these qualities. A sense of humor and fatalism allows Svenson to move freely from one obsession to the next, always manifest with extreme craft, diligence and love.

The Chinese Room

Dan Pinchbeck, Robert Briscoe, Jessica Curry, Jacky Morgan, Nigel Carrington, Ben Andrews & Samuel Justice
Dear Esther

“A deserted island… a lost man… memories of a fatal crash… a book written by a dying explorer.”

“Dear Esther” is a ghost story, told using first-person gaming technologies. Rather than traditional game-play the focus here is on exploration, uncovering the mystery of the island, of who you are and why you are here. Fragments of story are randomly uncovered when exploring the various locations of the island, making each journey a unique experience.

file festival

BITCRAZE

Crazyflie
The Crazyflie quadcopter was started late 2009 as a competence development project in the Swedish consulting company Epsilon AB in which all three of us where employed. This project was done on our free-time with component cost handled by Epsilon. In 2010 we finally decided to send to a video of the Crazyflie to Hackaday.com and that’s when things really took off. More development was done and we decided to make a Crazyflie kit that could be manufactured and sold as an open source development platform. To finance the development and manufacturing of the kit we created Bitcraze AB. At this point we felt that the project had outgrown the Daedalus Projects and decided to launch Bitcraze.se. The Daedalus projects website still exists to show off and advertise other Epsilon competence development project but the Crazyflie now lives in Bitcraze.Crazyflie is a small quadcopter that stated with a simple idea: get an electronic board to fly. We are three electronic engineer from Sweden and we wanted to make a small flying machine that could fly indoor (Sweden is often cold outside ) and with as few mechanical parts as possible. The result of this idea was a small quadcopter that uses its electronic board as main mechanical frame and with motors glued to the PCB:This fist prototype was as simple as possible while following our initial target to be small with the minimum of mechanical thought. After a couple of month of programming and debugging it actually flew and had some success when Hackaday featured it. This prototype was however a lot more frustrating to fly then it appears: each crash was potentially fatal for one or many motors. That made it quite stressful to fly as it would not allow mistake and we eventually broke all 3 prototypes (the red board is the 2.4GHz radio and was also a weak point).