PHILIP BEESLEY

Mäander
Meander ist eine großflächige immersive Testumgebung, die in einem historischen Lagergebäude im Zentrum einer Wohnhochhaussiedlung in Cambridge, Ontario, errichtet wurde. Die Netzgerüste, aus denen das Testfeld besteht, sind als eine Reihe von Arten innerhalb eines künstlichen Ökosystems organisiert, die sich sanft biegen und auf die Bewegung der Betrachter reagieren. Ähnlich wie in natürlichen Umgebungen wie Flüssen und Wolken leiten große Gruppen von Teilen physikalische Impulse und Datensignale hin und her, sodass die gesamte Umgebung als zusammenhängendes Ganzes arbeiten kann. Die Innovationen in Meander schlagen Wege vor, um adaptive, sensible Gebäude der Zukunft zu schaffen.

Yunchul Kim

Argos
The work Argos is a 41-channel muon particle detector. It reacts with a flash each time a muon particle emitted by the universe is detected in the air – a mechanism that is carried over to another work titled Impulse. Taking the form of a chandelier, Impulse is a work consisting of numerous cylindrical tubes that extend out like the hanging branches of a tree as clear fluid flows through them. Every time Argos detects a particle, it transmits a signal to Impulse, with the result that we can see with our own eyes the air bubbles and motion of the fluid running through the artwork.

Eirik Brandal

Waldian
Waldian is a standalone, wall hanging sound and light fixture capable of playing a near infinite amount of melodic permutations over a predetermined musical scale, complemented by emerging light patterns from twelve separate LEDs spread across the sculpture. In technical terms, Waldian contains two oscillators, an envelope generator and a voltage controlled amplifier, all controlled by impulses from a network of logic gates akin to those of early computers. These impulses are essentially the nerves in the electronic ecosystem, deciding over pitch and amplitude changes as well as creating bursts of light to highlight the entrances of each note. Finally, there is a tube overdrive stage that creates harmonic and subharmonics based on how far away the two oscillators are from each other in frequency. Most parameters are customizable, such as the aforementioned pitch, amplitude and overdrive, but the responsiveness and envelope of the light bursts can also be adjusted, directly affecting the appearance of the light patterns.

Philip Beesley

Meander
Meander is a large-scale immersive testbed environment constructed within a historic warehouse building at the centre of a residential highrise development in Cambridge, Ontario. The meshwork scaffolds which comprise the testbed are organized as a series of species within an artificial ecosystem, gently flexing and responding to the movement of viewers. Similar to natural environments such as rivers and clouds, large groups of parts pass physical impulses and data signals back and forth, enabling the entire environment to work as an interconnected whole. The innovations in Meander suggest ways of making adaptive, sensitive buildings of the future.

REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

Raster-Noton

White Circle
»White Circle« consists of fluorescent tubes that respond to musical impulses and illuminate the room. Five dedicated compositions by alva noto, byetone, frank bretschneider, and kangding ray playing in a continuous loop (one set takes ca. 45 minutes) model the interrelation between sound, light, and architecture in different ways. Each piece represents an independent and self-contained conceptual proposal by the respective composer. All tracks are multichannel compositions based on the idea of creating a vivid immediate experience of auditory space and visual stimuli. With acoustic material routed to twentyseven speakers placed throughout the gallery, sound itself takes on a threedimensional and indeed sculptural quality.

Arcangelo Sassolino

Damnatio Memoriae

From the Latin, damnatio memoriae describes an act of erasure from the historical record reserved for
those who have brought dishonor to the Roman State. Employed as the most stringent punishment for
treason, damnatio memoriae physically razes all traces of an individual from society, typically through
the destruction a statue’s physiognomy or the abrasion of inscribed monuments. Throughout the past
two decades, Sassolino has developed a body of work that examines the relationship between industrial
machines and humanist impulses where viewers are meant to question how an sculpture’s kinetic
function aesthetically and conceptually allegorizes human experiences and cultural conditions.

Alexandre Burton

Impacts
If you’ve never seen a Tesla coil in person, it’s a remarkable experience. Purple plasma flashes in unpredictable, wide-reaching bolts. The sound cracks with more fearsomeness than a whip. The air fills with the sterile acridity of ozone. The effect is equal parts frightening and beautiful; this machinery can use enough voltage to carbonize your flesh right down to the bone, yet some self-destructive impulse tells you to look closer. Alexandre Burton plays with this very impulse in his installation, Impacts. The exhibition features several Tesla coils that hang from the ceiling. They fire, not against a cage or predictable grounding surface, but a delicate pane of glass, so the viewer can appreciate the plasma filaments like a framed piece of art or a caged lion.

YUNCHUL KIM

Impulse
The Cascade Project explores matter by capturing the pattern of muons: i.e. electrically charged subatomic particles. It does so through an installation comprised of three live elements: a muon detector; a complex assemblage of pumps; and an arrangement of tubes through which fluid flows. When muons are detected, a light and connected pumps are activated, triggering the movement of an uncanny, viscous fluid through the sculptural system.

GUTO NÓBREGA

Breathing
File Festival
Breathing is a work of art based on a hybrid creature made of a living organism and an artificial system. The creature responds to its environment through movement, light and the noise of its mechanical parts. Breathing is the best way to interact with the creature.
This work is the result of an investigation of plants as sensitive agents for the creation of art. The intention was to explore new forms of artistic experience through the dialogue of natural and artificial processes. Breathing is a pre-requisite for life, and is the path that links the observer to the creature.Breathing is a small step towards new art forms in which subtle processes of organic and non-organic life may reveal invisible patterns that interconnect us.Breathing is a work of art driven by biological impulse. Its beauty is neither found isolated on the plant nor in the robotic system itself. It emerges at the very moment in which the observer approaches the creature and their energies are exchanged through the whole system. It is in that moment of joy and fascination, in which we find ourselves in a very strange dialogue, that a life metaphor is created.Breathing is the celebration of that moment.

OSKAR SCHLEMMER

أوسكار شليمر
奥斯卡·施莱默
אוסקר שלמר
オスカー·シュレンマー
오스카 슐 렘머
Оскар Шлеммер
Triadic Ballet
1-Margarete Hastings, Franz Schömbs, Georg Verden
1970
2-Super 16mm colour film, directed by Helmut Ammann.
Oskar Schlemmer saw the human body as a new artistic medium. He saw ballet and pantomimes as being free from the historical baggage of theater and opera and, therefore, capable of presenting his ideas of choreographed geometry, the man as a dancer, transformed by his costumes, moving in space. He saw the puppet and puppet movement as superior to that of the human, as this emphasized that the average of all art is artificial. This device could be expressed through stylized movements and the abstraction of the human body. Schlemmer saw the modern world being guided by two main currents, the mechanized (man as a machine and body as a mechanism) and the primordial impulse (the depths of creative urgency). He claimed that choreographed geometry offered a synthesis; the Dionysian and emotional origins of dance become rigid and Apollonian in its final form.

MELANIE BONAJO

梅拉妮·柏娜桥
waiting for something beautiful to happen

“[…]My work is an irregular impulse of experiences and aesthetic enjoyments stemming from the questions I have and the things that I know. I am not interested in a particular truth or a common reality, but I do have to understand and embody my truth, which I find from looking within. Although these things might be universal, consequently, questioning myself leads to the act of questioning you. Nothing should control the spirit…[…]”

RÉMY CLÉMENTE AND MORGAN MACCARI

Реми Клемента и Моргана Маккари
The Duramen Series

DURAMEN is a series of handmade wooden sculptures. Born of a simple impulse, the one to break with conventional ways of exhibiting, BONSOIR PARIS and its team have imagined a series of frames so strongly mistreated that they have become unrecognizable. Their wish is to break the properties of the compound, a form of compromise as minimal and it is efficient. They found a subtle twist while remaining faithful to a primitive form of revolt, without getting lost in vain styles effects.

TOSHIO IWAI

Piano
Iwai’s Piano — As Image Media (1995), a later sound work, is related to these early interactive experiments. Here the user, seated at the piano, triggers a flow of images that depress the piano’s keys; a consequence of this action releases yet another flight of images. The resulting interactive installation synthesizes two different aesthetics: sounds (simple melodies), images and a mechanical object (the piano) with digital media. A projected score and computer-generated imagery transform the piano into image media, hence the work’s name. Sound is the triumphant component in these works, for it activates and shapes the visual work. But the visual aspect of Iwai’s installations is lovely. His interactive systems appeal to the creative impulses of adults and children alike with their celebration of animation, computer potential, and the joy of sound.

Daniel Schulze / bitsbeauty

for those who see

In research of digital information the installation ‘for those who see’ shows the beauty of the unseen. The impulse of sound creates a vortex air ring‚ invisible, as the sound itself. Only fog is demonstrating this aesthetic phenomenon. Individually released to the air, our visual perception connects the single rings to patterns, surfaces or bodies, before they slowly dissolving. These could be viewed as a whole picture or an individual fragment – inviting one to contemplate and wonder.

LARRY FLINT

What A Way To Go!(Movie)
painting machines (Scene)

Paul Newman as “Larry Flint”, an ex-patriot artist living in Paris. Shirley MacLaine as “Louisa”, looking for the simple life._”Larry” develops abstract painting machines consisting of a controllable arm with a paint-brush “hand”._He explains to “Louisa”, “The sonic vibrations that go in there. And that gets transmitted to this photoelectric cell which gives those dynamic impulses to the brushes and the arms. And it’s a fusion of a mechanised world and a human soul.””Larry” uses a siren, horn, alarm bell, bongo, sledge hammer and a pneumatic jack hammer amongst other things as random sound sources for his abstract art.

PETER FLEMMING

Instrumentation

Alle Dinge haben eine natürliche Resonanzfrequenz. Interessanterweise deutet dies auf eine grundlegende Verbindung zwischen fast allem hin, aber lassen Sie uns auf der Ebene des Physischen bleiben. Wasser in einem Weinglas vibriert stark, wenn ein Finger über den Rand gezogen wird. Unser Körper hat Resonanzfrequenzen; Ebenso der Hefter auf meinem Schreibtisch, die Wolkenkratzer in der Innenstadt, die Brücke, die ich beim Verlassen von Montreal überquere, und die tektonischen Platten, die alles tragen. Inspiriert von dieser Resonanz ist Instrumentation eine ortsvariable, kinetische Klanginstallation. Beim Betreten des Hauptinstallationsraums hört man eine schimmernde Polyphonie aus Harmonischen, plötzlichen Crescendos und arrhythmischen Beats. Im Widerspruch zur Eleganz dieser Klänge stehen die unwahrscheinlichen Resonatoren, von denen sie ausgehen und die aus Altholz, Klammern, Eimern, Trommeln, geborgenen Fenstern und handgewickelten elektromagnetischen Spulen zusammengeschustert sind. Weitere Erkundungen zeigen einen sekundären Raum, der die Quelle der Aufführung enthält: eine Reihe kleiner mechanischer Geräte und scheinbar zufällige Schaltkreise. Ein großer Holztisch dient diesen nichtmenschlichen Darstellern als Bühne: Ein Hebel zieht eine Schnur, die an einem Elektrodenkolben in einem Gefäß mit elektrifiziertem Salzwasser befestigt ist; Das Zifferblatt eines Lichtdimmers dreht sich langsam unter der Kontrolle eines kleinen Motors. Vibrierende elektromagnetische Felder erzeugen Klavierdrähte und erzeugen Schlagimpulse in Trommeln und Metalldosen. Joghurtdeckel, die an Stöcken befestigt sind, schwanken über Lichtsensoren hin und her. Diese Elemente bilden zusammen spontan den hypnotischen Refrain von Instrumentation. Um schwingende Magnetfelder zu erzeugen, verwende ich einfache Oszillatorschaltungen, Seltenerdmagnete und billige oder handgewickelte elektromagnetische Spulen. Diese Felder aktivieren eine Reihe von Materialien wie Glasschrott, Metallgegenstände und gespannten Draht. Mit lichtempfindlichen Fotozellen in den Schaltkreisen können die Frequenzen durch Umgebungslichtpegel variiert werden, die von den mechanischen Leistungsträgern reguliert werden – motorisierte Lichtdimmervorrichtungen und automatische Lichtblockierklappen. Zusammen mit Büroklammern, Blue-Tack und Heißschmelzkleber bewahrt das behelfsmäßige Erscheinungsbild der Anordnung einen Sinn für die Experimente, aus denen sie hervorgegangen ist. Die Gesamtästhetik ist insofern offen, als die zugrunde liegende Technologie so transparent wie möglich belassen wurde. Obwohl sie auf ungewohnte Weise verwendet werden können, stammen Hinweise von vertrauten Gegenständen; wie Nähmaschinenspulen-Elektromagnete oder Mülleimer-Resonatoren. In Verbindung mit dem überzeugenden Klang bieten häusliche Teile eine unmittelbare körperliche Auseinandersetzung mit ansonsten immateriellen Phänomenen. Ein primäres Ziel, das ich als Künstler habe, ist es, Systeme zu bauen, die ich nicht vollständig verstehe, mit Verhaltensweisen, die ich nicht vollständig vorhersagen kann. In Instrumentation überlappen sich die Zyklen, synchronisieren sich und treten aus der Phase aus, wodurch gemeinsam eine endlos schwankende Tonspur erzeugt wird. Sie wurden in den USA, Europa und Asien in Auftrag gegeben – alle sind ortsspezifisch und vom umgebenden Raum und der Landschaft inspiriert.

TIM KNOWLES

Baumzeichnungen
Tim Knowles ist ein britischer multidisziplinärer Künstler. Obwohl er bestreitet, vom Wind besessen zu sein, hat dieses Element seine Arbeit sehr inspiriert, er liebt seine Eigenschaften und seine kontrollierende Abwesenheit. Das Objekt von Tim ist ein Beispiel für die Arbeit von Tim Knowles. Es handelt sich um eine Sammlung von Filzen aux-Zweigen, um diese Impulse zu erhalten, die Sie für Ihre Zweigen zu erhalten. Das Schöne an dieser Arbeit ist, dass Sie die intrinsischen Eigenschaften des Baumes spüren können, die flexibel, starr, leicht und zerbrechlich sein können.