peter greenaway and Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker

ROSA
A short film based on the work of choreographer Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker to Bartók music
Rosa (1992 ; ca. 16 min., b&w ; letterboxed format) / La Monnaie/De Munt & Rosas ; based on a choreography by Anpeter-greenaway-and-anne-teresa-de-keersmaekerne Teresa de Keersmaeker in collaboration with Jean-Luc Ducourt ; with Fumiyo Ikeda, Nordine Benchorf ; directed by Peter Greenaway ; a production of Entropie

Brian Eno & Peter Chilvers

Bloom
Requiring no musical or technical ability, the egalitarian and user-friendly Bloom app enabled anyone of any age to create music, simply by touching the screen. Part instrument, part composition and part artwork, Bloom’s innovative controls allowed users to create elaborate patterns and unique melodies by simply tapping the screen. A generative music player took over when Bloom was left idle, creating an infinite selection of compositions and their accompanying visualizations. This version uses mixed reality with HoloLens.

PETER WILLIAM HOLDEN

arabesque
“My recent investigations of this theme have involved the usage of computers combined with mechanical elements to create mandala like installations. These installations are my medium and I use them to create ephemeral animations. This ephemeral choreography of movement is the focal point of my work”.
FILE FESTIVAL

PETER GREENAWAY

بيتر غريناواي
彼得·格林纳威
פיטר גרינווי
ピーター·グリーナウェイ
피터 그리너웨이
Питер Гринуэй
The Pillow Book
Beautiful to behold and impossible to forget, THE PILLOW BOOK is auteur Peter Greenaway’s erotically-charged drama about love, death, revenge and the indelible nature of our earliest memories. Each year on her birthday, Nagiko (Vivian Wu) would became her father’s canvas, as he painted the creation myth in elaborate, elegant calligraphy on her body. Years later, she continues the practice with a succession of lovers, including a bisexual translator (Ewan McGregor) who becomes a pawn in an escalating game of vengeance against her beloved father’s exploitative publisher. Told in a series of chapters and featuring innovative cinematography and picture-in-picture techniques, Roger Ebert called THE PILLOW BOOK “a seductive and elegant story [that] stands outside the ordinary.”

cinema full

PETER MOVRIN

“Movrin’s main inspiration has always been his childhood, where tradition, God and meat were the subject of everyday life. As an only son of a butcher in a small Slovenian town, surrounded by woods and bears, his growing up marked him with a roughness that he transcends in his designs with a special kind of romanticism. In this hard provincial life meat became his medium of expression, as a child he would carve steaks in a way that would appeal to his bewildered eye. There were, however, also fresh issues of Vogue magazines in the house, brought from trips to Trieste, that stirred up his imagination.” Black Sheep

mode:Niko Riam

PETER BROOK

بيتر بروك
彼得·布鲁克
פיטר ברוק
ピーター·ブルック
피터 브룩
ПИТЕР БРУК
The suit
The Suit a été dirigée par Peter Brook, metteur en scène anglais installé en France depuis la fin des années 1970, et Marie-Hélène Nastier, sa collaboratrice de longue date. La pièce débute sur un vaudeville : une femme trompe son mari, le mari les découvre, l’amant s’enfuit et oublie sa veste: « the suit » (« le costume »). Le mari décide alors de faire porter à sa femme le poids de son infidélité. Elle devra emmener avec elle, partout où elle va, la veste oubliée. La musique du compositeur français Franck Krawczyk accompagne les acteurs sur scène.

PETER KOGLER

彼得·科格勒
Liquid
Peter Kogler`s works belong to the developing “post medial paintings” (Peter Weibl) in the 80`s. Moulded by the new media, these took on the complex form of installations. One of the main questions was the mental relationship between virtual and real space, as well as the perceptive possibilities of connection. The work, which reminds you of chaotic structures and Baroque dimensions, is based on the circularly moment of repetition, that consciously corresponds to the position of kunst Meran (pedestrian zone).

Peter Jansen

The Olympics
Peter Jansen (1956) studied Physics and Philosophy at the university.For a number of years he worked as a guide, accompanying groups on survival and canoe trips, after which he dedicated his live entirely to the arts. Based on his ideas on transposition and movement the artist Peter Jansen uses shapes of the human body to create energetic spaces.

Peter Lik

kanion antyotypy arizona
Peter Lik is a photographer from Australia, best known for his nature and panoramic landscape images.
This practice continued when he took road trips out of the city and into the wilds of Australia, often accompanied by his friend and fellow photographer Michael Plumridge. As a photographer, Lik is self-taught, learning mostly by trial and error.

Peter Flemming

Canoe
The work here in Dawson is like an old vehicle in which I’ve put a new engine. Entitled Canoe, it consists of an approximately 20 foot long trough of water, that resembles some kind of boat. This provides a means for a gunwales tracking mechanism to slowly, endlessly paddle its way back and forth. It was first constructed in 2001 in a studio beside Halifax harbour. It draws visual inspiration from the bridges and water vessels of this port. Conceptually, it grew from an interest in technological obsolescence: how things (like canoes) make shifts from utility to leisure.
It has experienced several major rebuilds since 2001. Most of them have been practical, but for Dawson I’ve opted for an experimental configuration that changes significantly the nature of the work. Previously, Canoe has only ever been shown indoors. Normally in runs on rechargeable batteries, with a continuous, smooth motion. In Dawson, it is shown outdoors, alongside the Yukon river, showing up in an absurd way the paleness of its artificial river. Here, the primary source of power is sunlight.
Making use of the long northern day, solar panels receive light, storing energy in an array of super-capacitor cells. At this time, Canoe remains still. A custom circuit monitors the amount of charge, and when a predetermined trigger point is reached, it is dumped into Canoe’s electric motor in a burst, allowing it to make a few strokes. Then Canoe rests, while the charging cycle begins again. Motion is intermittent, entirely dependent on the amount and intensity of sunlight. It ranges from near standstill in overcast conditions to perhaps 1 or 2 strokes every minute in full light. The technical term for this type of circuit is a relaxation oscillator. I like this term because, if you remove it from its technical context, it points back to ideas about leisure and utility.

Matthias Zwicker, Wojciech Matusik, Fredo Durand, and Hanspeter Pfister

Automultiscopic 3D displays
Automultiscopic 3D displays allow a large number of viewers to experience 3D content simultaneously without the hassle of special glasses or head gear. This display uses a dense array of 216 video projectors to generate images with high angular density over a wide field of view. As users move around the display, their eyes smoothly transition from one view to the next. The display is ideal for displaying life-size human subjects, as it allows for natural personal interactions with 3D cues such as eye-gaze and spatial hand gestures.

Peter Weibel

Петер Вайбель
Mechanik der Organismen

Peter Weibel followed his artistic thoughts using a wide variety of materials, shapes and techniques. In the mid-1980s, he explored the possibilities of the computer assisting in video processing. In the early 1990s he created an interactive installation based on reality, again showing the relationship between the media and the construction of reality.
In his opinions and articles, Weibel comments on contemporary art, media history and theory, film, video art and philosophy. As a theorist and tutor, he defends an art form that includes in its history, the history of technology and the history of science.

PETER GREENAWAY

بيتر غريناواي
彼得·格林纳威
פיטר גרינווי
ピーター·グリーナウェイ
피터 그리너웨이
Питер Гринуэй
Goltzius & the Pelican Company International
Cinema

PETER FLEMMING

Instrumentation

Alle Dinge haben eine natürliche Resonanzfrequenz. Interessanterweise deutet dies auf eine grundlegende Verbindung zwischen fast allem hin, aber lassen Sie uns auf der Ebene des Physischen bleiben. Wasser in einem Weinglas vibriert stark, wenn ein Finger über den Rand gezogen wird. Unser Körper hat Resonanzfrequenzen; Ebenso der Hefter auf meinem Schreibtisch, die Wolkenkratzer in der Innenstadt, die Brücke, die ich beim Verlassen von Montreal überquere, und die tektonischen Platten, die alles tragen. Inspiriert von dieser Resonanz ist Instrumentation eine ortsvariable, kinetische Klanginstallation. Beim Betreten des Hauptinstallationsraums hört man eine schimmernde Polyphonie aus Harmonischen, plötzlichen Crescendos und arrhythmischen Beats. Im Widerspruch zur Eleganz dieser Klänge stehen die unwahrscheinlichen Resonatoren, von denen sie ausgehen und die aus Altholz, Klammern, Eimern, Trommeln, geborgenen Fenstern und handgewickelten elektromagnetischen Spulen zusammengeschustert sind. Weitere Erkundungen zeigen einen sekundären Raum, der die Quelle der Aufführung enthält: eine Reihe kleiner mechanischer Geräte und scheinbar zufällige Schaltkreise. Ein großer Holztisch dient diesen nichtmenschlichen Darstellern als Bühne: Ein Hebel zieht eine Schnur, die an einem Elektrodenkolben in einem Gefäß mit elektrifiziertem Salzwasser befestigt ist; Das Zifferblatt eines Lichtdimmers dreht sich langsam unter der Kontrolle eines kleinen Motors. Vibrierende elektromagnetische Felder erzeugen Klavierdrähte und erzeugen Schlagimpulse in Trommeln und Metalldosen. Joghurtdeckel, die an Stöcken befestigt sind, schwanken über Lichtsensoren hin und her. Diese Elemente bilden zusammen spontan den hypnotischen Refrain von Instrumentation. Um schwingende Magnetfelder zu erzeugen, verwende ich einfache Oszillatorschaltungen, Seltenerdmagnete und billige oder handgewickelte elektromagnetische Spulen. Diese Felder aktivieren eine Reihe von Materialien wie Glasschrott, Metallgegenstände und gespannten Draht. Mit lichtempfindlichen Fotozellen in den Schaltkreisen können die Frequenzen durch Umgebungslichtpegel variiert werden, die von den mechanischen Leistungsträgern reguliert werden – motorisierte Lichtdimmervorrichtungen und automatische Lichtblockierklappen. Zusammen mit Büroklammern, Blue-Tack und Heißschmelzkleber bewahrt das behelfsmäßige Erscheinungsbild der Anordnung einen Sinn für die Experimente, aus denen sie hervorgegangen ist. Die Gesamtästhetik ist insofern offen, als die zugrunde liegende Technologie so transparent wie möglich belassen wurde. Obwohl sie auf ungewohnte Weise verwendet werden können, stammen Hinweise von vertrauten Gegenständen; wie Nähmaschinenspulen-Elektromagnete oder Mülleimer-Resonatoren. In Verbindung mit dem überzeugenden Klang bieten häusliche Teile eine unmittelbare körperliche Auseinandersetzung mit ansonsten immateriellen Phänomenen. Ein primäres Ziel, das ich als Künstler habe, ist es, Systeme zu bauen, die ich nicht vollständig verstehe, mit Verhaltensweisen, die ich nicht vollständig vorhersagen kann. In Instrumentation überlappen sich die Zyklen, synchronisieren sich und treten aus der Phase aus, wodurch gemeinsam eine endlos schwankende Tonspur erzeugt wird. Sie wurden in den USA, Europa und Asien in Auftrag gegeben – alle sind ortsspezifisch und vom umgebenden Raum und der Landschaft inspiriert.

PETER COFFIN

פיטר קופין
ピーター·コフィン
spiral staircase

Coffin’s Untitled (Spiral Staircase) takes the idea of a simple architectural fitting to an absurd extreme. Reminiscent of Escher’s Infinite Staircase, Coffin’s winding steps are moulded into a circle, inexhaustibly twisting in impossible logic made real. By remodeling the steps, Coffin strips the staircase of its function, turning a thing which is normally engaged with physicality into a dizzying conceptual game. Through his humorous constructions, Coffin bridges art history and everyday experience, subverting the preconceptions of both.

ROBERT WILSON

بوب ويلسون
鲍伯·威尔逊
בוב וילסון
ロバート·ウィルソン
밥 윌슨
БОБ УИЛСОН
Peter Pan

All in all, Robert Wilson’s Peter Pan is in itself a great adventure. Although it starts slowly and affectedly, it by and by offers the most stunning images and captivating performances, which are filled with plenty of mystery and possess emotional depth, letting us reflect upon our childhoods – all the varied ones each one of us had and has.

BJOERN SCHUELKE

Bildverarbeitungsmaschine
Björn Schülke ist von den kinetischen Skulpturen des deutschen Klangkünstlers Peter Vogel und Jean Tinguely beeinflusst und schafft komplexe vom Betrachter aktivierte Maschinen, die Bewegung, Überwachung und Klang kombinieren.

Steve Messam

Apollo
Victor Pasmore’s ‘Apollo’ Pavilion sits at the heart of the Sunny Blunts estate in Peterlee[…] Four large orange forms intersect the pavilion at right angles to the main orientation and appear to slice through the pavilion. The blocks are drawn from the geometry of the pavilion and a nod to the remote object planes of Victor Pasmore’s work. The inflatable textiles blocks create a juxtaposition between the angular grey concrete of the pavilion and the soft, rounded, colourful forms of the installation. The intervention is deliberately bold with a strong visual aesthetic to temporarily transform the pavilion. The piece is also, on the surface, playful, tactile and accessible – encouraging the audience to look at the pavilion with fresh eyes.

Pablo Valbuena

Array [wave]
Wave depicts a sculptural volume unfolding over time – the Shape of Light seized in perpetual movement. It uses ephemeral and intangible materials – light and sound – and can be traversed by the observer, immersing them into the shapes cast by the undulating light columns. The work creates a malleable experience of scale: it shifts between object and environment depending on the observer’s position inside, outside, or at the boundary of the installation.

Golan Levin

Ghost Pole Propagator II
Ghost Pole Propagator captures and replays the skeletons of passersby in its environment, creating a layered and dynamic tapestry that reflects the history and activity of a locale. Presenting a universal communication of presence, attitude and gesture, the stick-figures this artwork generates are compact and expressive means of representing the human form. The format of the work is variable; in some presentations, the project serves as a kind of ‘interpretive monitoring station’ for nearby pedestrian traffic.

Maria Takeuchi & Frederico Phillips

asphyxia
The performance is centered in an eloquent choreography that stresses the desire to be expressive without bounds. Motion data was captured using inexpensive sensors and that data paved the way through an extensive number of steps. Once all the scanned point cloud data were combined, they were used as the base for the creative development on the piece. A series of iterative studies on styles followed and several techniques and dynamic simulations were then applied using a number 3D tools for various results.

Lin Hwai-min

cursive II
Ross MacGibbon
Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan
Lin Hwai-min’s Cursive II is inspired by the aesthetics of calligraphy. Set to music by John Cage, it is an exquisite meditation on the balancing of opposites presented in delicate simplicity, allowing no distraction from the details of the dance.

Bjoern Schuelke

Vision Machine #8
Influenced by German sound artist Peter Vogel and Jean Tinguely’s kinetic sculptures , Björn Schülke creates complex viewer-activated machines that combine movement, surveillance, and sound.

TERMINALBEACH

The Heart Chamber Orchestra
File Festival – Hipersonica 

In the TERMINALBEACH Heart Chamber Orchestra (made up of artists Erich Berger and Peter Vatava), twelve musicians played pieces from the heartbeat, recorded by an electrocardiogram from data sent by sensors placed on their bodies. As the live score created in real time from the physical and emotional states of the musicians, their beats further influenced the resulting musical composition. In this way, the biological feedback loop becomes a self-generating, organic and evolving system, which creates a musical score and a show that adopts the form of open or network art, in which chance and interdependence, thus how emotional changes and computational reasoning create a biological and psychological dynamic at the same time.

GEORGE IVANOVICH GURDJIEFF

“Man lives his life in sleep, and in sleep he dies.” ‘As a result of this each person perceives things from a completely subjective perspective. He asserted that people in their typical state function as unconscious automatons, but that a person can “wake up” and become a different sort of human being altogether” GEORGE IVANOVICH GURDJIEFF

meetings with remarkable by Peter Brook