REVITAL COHEN & TUUR VAN BALEN

The Immortal
A number of life-support machines are connected to each other, circulating liquids and air in attempt to mimic a biological structure.
The Immortal investigates human dependence on electronics, the desire to make machines replicate organisms and our perception of anatomy as reflected by biomedical engineering.
A web of tubes and electric cords are interwoven in closed circuits through a Heart-Lung Machine, Dialysis Machine, an Infant Incubator, a Mechanical Ventilator and an Intraoperative Cell Salvage Machine. The organ replacement machines operate in orchestrated loops, keeping each other alive through circulation of electrical impulses, oxygen and artificial blood.
Salted water acts as blood replacement: throughout the artificial circulatory system minerals are added and filtered out again, the blood gets oxygenated via contact with the oxygen cycle, and an ECG device monitors the system’s heartbeat. As the fluid pumps around the room in a meditative pulse, the sound of mechanical breath and slow humming of motors resonates in the body through a comforting yet disquieting soundscape.Life support machines are extraordinary devices; computers designed to activate our bodies when anatomy fails, hidden away in hospital wards. Although they are designed as the ultimate utilitarian appliances, they are extremely meaningful and carry a complex social, cultural and ethical subtext. While life prolonging technologies are invented as emergency measures to combat or delay death, my interest lies in considering these devices as a human enhancement strategy.This work is a continuation of my investigation of the patient as a cyborg, questioning the relationship between medicine and techno- fantasies about mechanical bodies, hyper abilities and posthumanism.

Ben Cullen Williams

Remnants

Remnants is an installation, comprised of two individual sculptures, Anatomy and Lacuna, which explores this evolving symbiosis between the mechanical and the biological become. Anatomy and Lacuna are constructed of aluminium, both containing areas of uncertain space. Anatomy contains a plane of black viscous matter and Lacuna, a black void, creating a tension between the two sculptures. The work draws on diagrammatic anatomical and architectural models, distorting scale and hijacking visual languages, creating an undetermined terrain where the purpose of our made objects is undefined.

Iris Van Herpen

АЙРИС ВАН ЭРПЕН
イリス ヴァン ヘルペン
FALL 2017
AERIFORM

‘Aeriform’ examines the nature and anatomy of air and the idea of airborne materiality and lightness, creating negative and positive space with shadow and light. Van Herpen also drew inspiration from the Danish underwater artists Between Music who challenge the relationship between the body and its elemental surround, in a subaquatic environment where air is absent.

Olga Noronha

She has a thing for anatomy, inherited from her parents. But instead of becoming a doctor, Olga Noronha (born in 1990) transformed this interest into a unique language that creates a dialogue between the human body and sculptural pieces of jewelry. Like in series “Orpus in Claustrum”. The collection presents a courageous juxtaposition of crimson priestesses in soft silhouettes and sensational structured items that envelope the model like a modern-day Aelita, queen of space, from the homonymous movie of 1924 directed by Constructivist Yakov Protazanov.

WAYNE MCGREGOR

واين ماكغريغور
韦恩·麦格雷戈
웨인 맥그리거
ויין מקגרגור
ウェイン·マクレガー
Уэйн МакГрегор
rAndom International
FAR
Wayne McGregor’s anatomy-defying choreography and ground-breaking approach across dance, science, film, music, visual art and technology has fuelled a string of truly unique works. FAR is no exception. Inspired by the controversial Age of Enlightenment, FAR mines an era that first placed ‘a body in question’. Ten incredible dancers confront the distortions, sensuality and feeling of the 18th Century‘s searing contemporary sensibility to a haunting score by the critically-acclaimed composer Ben Frost. Staged in a mesmerizing environment of shadow and light (rAndom International, Lucy Carter), object and film (Moritz Junge, Ravi Deepres), FAR binds cutting edge design with choreography made from a radical cognitive research process.

Olga Noronha

She has a thing for anatomy, inherited from her parents. But instead of becoming a doctor, Olga Noronha (born in 1990) transformed this interest into a unique language that creates a dialogue between the human body and sculptural pieces of jewelry.

Amy Karle

Internal Collection
FILE SAO PAULO 2017
Internal Collection
Switching up conventions about the body and beauty, the selections from her “Internal Collection” showing at FILE represent internal anatomy in external wearable form. Merging anatomy, fashion, and technology, each piece is created by hand and digital manufacturing technologies. By depicting designs inspired by anatomy, this work communicates that, when we share our likeness and what is going on inside of us, an opportunity is offered for finding beauty within ourselves and connection with others.

ANNE TYNG

Anatomy of Form
The Divine Proportion in the Platonic Solids

In fact, the Graham Foundation recognized Tyng’s talent nearly half a century ago in 1965, when she was awarded for her project Anatomy of Form: The Divine Proportion in the Platonic Solids:In her research she developed a theory of hierarchies of symmetry—symmetries within symmetries—and a search for architectural insight and revelation in the consistency and beauty of all underlying form.It’s fascinating stuff, and the images alone have piqued my interest in Tyng’s theories, which cover topics from Jungian cycles to the cosmos. Tyng (b. 1920 in Jiangxi, China) was one of the first women to earn a Masters in Architecture from Harvard. She spent nearly three decades collaborating with Louis Kahn before shifting her focus to research at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 60’s. The title of the exhibition and her works belie the understated beauty of their execution, which demonstrate the expressive power of order and geometry. Tyng’s unique command of form is matched by her raw intellect; thus, she elegantly articulates her vision in the models seen here.