Di Mainstone & Joanna Berzowska

Skorpions
LUTTERGILL
Skorpions are a set of kinetic electronic garments that move and change on the body in slow, organic motions.They breathe and pulse, controlled by their own internal programming. They are not “interactive” artifacts insofar as their programming does not respond to simplistic sensor data. They have intentionality; they are programmed to live, to exist, to subsist. They are living behavioral kinetic sculptures that exploit characteristics such as control, anticipation and unpredictability. They have their own personalities, their own fears and desires.

Behnaz Farahi

Synapse
Synapse is a 3D-printed helmet which moves and illuminates according to brain activity[…] The main intention of this project is to explore the possibilities of multi-material 3D printing in order to produce a shape-changing structure around the body as a second skin. Additionally, the project seeks to explore direct control of the movement with neural commands from the brain so that we can effectively control the environment around us through our thoughts. The environment therefore becomes an extension of our bodies. This project aims to play with the intimacy of our bodies and the environment to the point that the distinction between them becomes blurred, as both have ‘become’ a single entity. The helmet motion is controlled by the Eletroencephalography (EEG) of the brain. A Neurosky’s EEG chip and Mindflex headset have been modified and redesigned in order to create a seamless blend between technology and design.

GUY BEN-ARY, PHILIP GAMBLEN AND STEVE POTTER

Silent Barrage

Silent Barrage has a “biological brain” that telematically connects with its “body” in a way that is familiar to humans: the brain processes sense data that it receives, and then brain and body formulate expressions through movement and mark making. But this familiarity is hidden within a sophisticated conceptual and scientific framework that is gradually decoded by the viewer. The brain consists of a neural network of embryonic rat neurons, growing in a Petri dish in a lab in Atlanta, Georgia, which exhibits the uncontrolled activity of nerve tissue that is typical of cultured nerve cells. This neural network is connected to neural interfacing electrodes that write to and read from the neurons. The thirty-six robotic pole-shaped objects of the body, meanwhile, live in whatever exhibition space is their temporary home. They have sensors that detect the presence of viewers who come in. It is from this environment that data is transmitted over the Internet, to be read by the electrodes and thus to stimulate, train or calm parts of the brain, depending on which area of the neuronal net has been addressed.

Studio Drift

L’Orfeo.
Dutch National Touring Opera’s production of L’Orfeo.
Artist Lonneke Gordijn, together with director Monique Wagenmakers and choreographer Nanine Linning, created a new interpretation of L’Orfeo.
The kinetic sculpture EGO, specially developed for LOrfeo, is a handwoven block controlled by algorithms and motors. The block has the ability to shift its shape and state, embodying Orfeo’s perspectives and thoughts. The oldest opera combined with modern cutting edge technology.

Marcel·lí Antúnez Roca

Afasia
File Festival – Hypersonica
Afasia is a surreal robotic performance that evolves Greek myths, and brings up the tragedy onto-machinal. Marcel.lí Antúnez Roca (Moià, 1959) is well-known in the international art scene for his mechatronic performances and robotic installations. In the 90′s his vanguardist mechatronic performances combined elements such as Bodybots (body-controlled robots), Systematurgy (interactive narration with computers) and Dresskeleton (the exoskeleton body interface). The themes explored in his work include: the use of biological materials in robotics, telematic control, the expansion of body movements with dresskeletons and microbiological transformations.

lucy mcrae

future dayspa
The Future Day Spa is a personlised, physiological experience delivering controlled vacuum pressure to the body replicating the feeling of being hugged. Guided by a therapist, participants hand their bodies over to a part–human, part–machine process inducing a state of relaxation. A collaboration between Qualcomm’s Inventor Lab, we integrated technologies for capturing biometric data to understand the physiological benefits of a treatment.

RICHARD DUPONT

理查德·杜邦
리처드 듀퐁

Manipulating 3-D scans of his own body on the computer, Mr. Dupont then marries digital fabrication methods like rapid prototyping and computer numerically controlled milling with traditional plaster casting and other laborious hand work to make figures that can appear both archaic and futuristic. One of his standing nudes, similar in posture to the Kouros statues from ancient Greece, appears to melt into ripples when viewed on one axis, suggesting the psychic experience of man in the modern world.

Ursula Neugebauer

tour en l’air
With “tour en l’air”, the Berlin artist Ursula Neugebauer returns to an unforgettable childhood experience: Donned with the first long skirt in the fast turn around your own axis, to experience a previously unknown body feeling – and to get to know a new form of stability in the rotation.
Tour en l’air is an impressive installation at the intersection of fashion, art and architecture. Decorative busts slip into several floor-length red taffeta dresses and come to life thanks to computer-controlled electric motors. Although the individual components are of purely mechanical and material origin, the overall composition appears as a poetic expression of the human: namely a magical dance.

TAMAS WALICZKY

Marionettes
FILE FESTIVAL 

“Marionettes” is a seven-minute computer animation about collapse. Marionettes are controlled by strings: if there is no string, they collapse. Nobody animates the body. If nobody animates the body, it will be animated by natural forces. Mass. Gravity. Collision. Randomization. In this animation, the animator does not animate in traditional terms. Thus, we might say it is an anti-animation.
The forces that control the movements of the marionettes are calculated by physical simulation algorithms. Therefore, these movements are strictly mathematical ones. They are dramatic, too. They visualize collapse in its physical and – amazingly enough from puppets animated by machines – psychological sense.