nieto sobejano

The Contemporary Art Center in Córdoba is not a centralized building: the center moves from one space to another, it is everywhere. It is configured as a sequence of precincts linked to a public space, onto which all the different functions of the building flow. Conceived as a place for interaction, it is a common space in which one can express and exchange ideas, see an installation, access exhibitions, visit the cafeteria, spend time in the media library, wait for a performance to begin in the black box, or maybe simply look out onto the Guadalquivir River. The materials help to achieve the art factory character pervading the entire project. In the interior, bare walls, slabs of concrete, and continuous paved flooring establish a spatial structure susceptible to being transformed individually through different interventions. A network of electric, digital, audiovisual, and lighting infrastructures ease access to sockets and connections throughout the building. On the exterior, the building asserts its presence by means of a single material: prefabricated concrete fiberglass panels, or GRC.

Joe Hambleton

Stasis in Flux
“Stasis in Flux is an experimentation of animation’s potential to mimic the real. I began by building a functional zoetrope within 3D space to test if persistence of vision is replicated accurately. From this experiment I realized 3D animations potential to go beyond the physical limits of the real, allowing me to coordinate movements between both the camera and the zoetrope to replicate much more advanced cinematic techniques. The result is a carefully choreographed animation that represents the ebb and flow of the creative process.” Joe Hambleton

Kyle Dunn

КАЙЛ ДАНН
Kyle Austin Dunn uses sculpture and painting to create his abstract geometric pieces. Dunn manages to bring inanimate objects to life as his varied shapes take on behaviour and emotion via his keen use of colour and neutral tones. The gap between sculpture and painting is easily bridged by Dunn, his pieces seem to flow between both disciplines effortlessly. Dunn creates from his studio just north of San Francisco in the US, making his living by building custom furniture for clients around the Bay Area.

Christian de Portzamparc and Peter Marino

Flagship Dior
“I wanted the building to represent Dior and to reflect Christian Dior’s work. So I wanted the surfaces to flow, like the couturier’s soft, woven white cotton fabric. These surfaces, which soar into the sky and undulate as if in motion, crossed by a few lines, are made from long moulded fiber glass shells, fitted together with aircraft precision.”more

OTA+

Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art
This building proposal challenges the traditional definition of a museum and the conventional relationship between building and site. The ground floor of the building is reduced to a nominal footprint, enclosing only enough space for basic services, structure and ticketing functions. The ground plane is primarily reserved for exterior public space, including an art park, Hall of Fame, and garden walk. The bulk of the program and building mass are split by the open ground floor. Half of the building is coupled with the earth while the other half hovers in the air. The purpose is twofold; to minimize the damaging effects of extreme local weather by harnessing environmental flows toward productive outcomes and to re-conceptualize the identity of a modern art museum. The manicured roof plane of the below ground program is pocketed with water absorbing vegetation and catchment systems, while the hovering museum above expands to form open atriums, allowing diffuse light to brighten the space and passive airflow to comfortably condition the building.The program of the museum is interconnected. The Contemporary Museum of Art, Children’s Museum of Art and Administration are located within the floating mass. The lecture hall, parking, art resource center, library and classrooms are located below ground. The programs below ground are easily accessible and directly connected through vertical circulation tubes, providing both structural support for the floating mass above and space for movement systems, such as escalators, stairs and elevators between levels. All of the below ground programs are flooded with diffuse light passing through skylights that penetrate the landscape.

MARGARET GRIFFIN

Schindler’s Paradox Box

The double helix ramps descend towards the new open auditorium and climb 15 meters until they reach an open roof garden that offers interesting views from below, from above and the border between them. Helical lines are connected on the north side of the house to reconnect on the roof and at the level of the underground auditorium. The interlocking ramps create a continuous common surface that flows between them, emphasizing views of the property, Kings Road and adjoining apartment buildings. The support surfaces of the ramps are independent of the Berlin walls that support them.