Gustav Metzger

Liquid Crystal Environment

Liquid Crystal Environment is made using heat-sensitive liquid crystals that are placed between glass slides and inserted into projectors. The slides are rotated to create movement within the liquid, and as the crystals are heated and cooled they change colour. The patterns produced within the various slides are then simultaneously projected onto screens around the exhibiting space, all under the control of a computer program.

Lauren Bowker

The Unseen Collection
Lauren Bowker describes herself a materials alchemist. After developing a pollution sensing compound while studying at Manchester School of Art, she went on to study textiles at the Royal College of Art in London and created a series of inks which change colour in response to heat, light, wind and environmental changes.

LAUREN BOWKER

The Unseen Collection
Experimental fashion studio The Unseen has produced a range of accessories that alter in response to environmental changes using inks developed from its colour-shifting wearable sculptures. Bowker has previously embedded her specially developed ink into feathered, leather and gemstone-encrusted headdresses. The Unseen also presented a sculptural jacket that changes colour depending on the wearer’s mood.

Liz West

Our Colour
Does colour change the way you feel? What does it feel like to be inside a rainbow? For the 2016 edition of the Bristol Biennial British artist Liz West invited visitors to drench themselves in the spectrum. West transformed architectural space and turned colour into an immersive and embodied experience by refracting light through carefully arranged coloured theatre gels. A vivid world was created, exploring human visual perception and how colour affects our emotions and our bodies.

UVA UNITED VISUAL ARTISTS

Blueprint
Blueprint embraces the relationship and parallels between art and science, creating compositions through the mathematical principles of logic that underpin life. Exploring analogies between DNA and computer code, UVA have created the Blueprint series; works that pair genetics and code as the blueprints of artificial and natural systems. As the work slowly changes over time, patterns fluctuate between varying degrees of complexity. Blueprint uses the basic concepts of evolution to create an ever-transitioning image. With cells literally transferring their genes to their adjoining others, colour flows like paint across the canvas. Drawing up a unique colourful composition every minute, Blueprint presents the unlimited outcome that results from a single algorithm; a single set of rules.

GeeksArt

Wavelet
It uses the changing light to mimic the flowing water. Wavelet is composed of 1,300 light-responsive light bulbs. Each light bulb is designed in an arc shape, which gives the light wave a distinct direction. Each of the teardrop-shaped light bulbs is embedded with custom-made electronics that detect and react to changes in light and colour. When any of the light bulbs detect a change in colour or light, it displays the colour accordingly. When any of of the lights are turned on, the adjacent light bulbs react to the light change and the light waves automatically expand out to the very edge of the installation. From a single source of light, waves spread out like a series of dominoes. The random variable patterns created give a pleasant surprise to the audience.

South Georgia Heritage

NEON – Fantastical Architecture, Art and Design

FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT
South Georgia Heritage Trust launched an open call for a site-specific commission to be located on Grytviken the former whaling station of sub-Antarctic Island of South Georgia. The project was required to celebrate the whale through a reinterpretation of the former Flensing Plan (a large timber deck used to process the captured whales) and offer a message of hope for future generations by demonstrating how humankind can move from exploitation to conservation. Our proposal imagines that the deck of the Flensing plan has been cut like a piece of flesh from the ground and bent upwards to form an arc. The timber deck is replaced with concrete pavers which are coloured based on the activities which took place in the sites past and present (whale processing and whale watching). The coloured pavers are positioned to create a gradient which provides the visitor with a visual representation of the way the site has changed over time.

Akane Moriyama + Jasper Carlsen

Reflected Roof
A series of fans gently shape the textile into a sequence of changing forms that although programmed will never exactly repeat. The daylight, cast from above, falls onto and through the fabric and as it’s angle changes throughout the day creates ever changes in colour, shadow and reflection.

Olafur Eliasson

Your Body Of Work
Transparent sheets of coloured plastic – in either cyan, magenta, or yellow – are suspended from the ceiling to form a maze. Additional colours appear where these hues visually overlap, forming spontaneous compositions that continually change in response to viewers’ movement through the space. ‘Seu corpo da obra’ was inspired by the work of Brazilian artist Hélio Oiticica (1937–1980).

Leslie Henshaw

Chromatophores Collection
“Chromatophores are the cells that give some creatures of nature the miraculous ability to change their colour to protect themselves,” says Leslie. “Like chameleons, jellyfish, cuttlefish and frogs they can change from muted tones into brightly coloured and vibrant stripes or patches of colours that are mesmerising. With this collection I imagined what it would be like if humans could perform this amazing feat with their hair.”

KRIJN DE KONING

laberinto cromatico
Dutch artist Krijn de Koning has created a labyrinthine walkway between brightly coloured walls on a terrace at the Turner Contemporary gallery in Margate, England.
The first public commission in England by De Koning, the Dwelling installation comprises a series of angled walls punctured with doorways and windows that create a trail for visitors to navigate through.Situated on the south terrace of the David Chipperfield-designed Turner Contemporary, the walls are positioned between the exterior of the gallery building and the site boundary.The elements slot between existing structures, incorporating changes in floor level and abutting permanent concrete balustrades.“The artist’s site-specific works – part architecture, part sculpture – challenge the viewer, offering new possibilities to navigate and experience the space the works inhabit,” said a statement from the gallery.Perpendicular surfaces, including door and window recesses, are all painted in different colours.The bright tones reference traditional seaside pavilions and beach huts, a common feature along the UK coast.The maze is open to the sky so shadows move across the surfaces of installation through the day.Architectural features including windows and doors are different sizes and positioned at various heights, allowing some to be clambered over or crawled beneath.