ART+COM

IN MEMORIAM
Joachim Sauter

1959-2021

R.I.P

ART+COM Studios

MOBILITY
THE INSTALLATION SPANS A CORRIDOR OF 7-METRES WIDTH. ON THE LEFT WALL ONE HUNDRED PROSTHETIC HANDS ARRANGED IN A MATRIX REVOLVE AROUND THEIR OWN VERTICAL AXIS, THE MOVEMENTS BEING CONTROLLED BY MOTORS. THE MIRRORS THEY HOLD REFLECT THE BEAM OF A STRONG LIGHT ACROSS THE SPACE AND ONTO THE OPPOSITE WALL. WHAT INITIALLY SEEMS LIKE AN ASYNCHRONOUS, CHAOTIC PATTERN OF MOVEMENT SOON REVEALS ITSELF AS A COMPLEX, COMPUTATIONAL
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流动性
该安装跨越了7米宽的走廊。在左墙上,排列成矩阵的一百个假肢手绕其自身的垂直轴旋转,其运动由电动机控制。他们持有的镜子将强光光束反射穿过整个空间并射向对面的墙壁。最初看起来像是一个异步的,混乱的运动模式,很快就显示出一种复杂的计算编排:首先,一百光点围绕一个中心点移动,类似于行星的天体动力学或昆虫群的飞行模式。并创造出三维空间的印象。然后突然之间,这种有机振动会聚成一个表示运动和动作的汉字。

Martin Leveque

SANCTUAIRE
Sanctuaire it’s all about my relationship with Mexico City. A space filled with its own pure and special energy. To me is a never ending source of inspiration. This city is benefited of the powerful vibe, result of many factors provoked by its habitants. From far away, this city is characterized by a chaotic and indescribable movement. To be able to understand this, one must come close to realize that this apparent chaos is the manifestation of millions of individual actions from its habitants. Sanctuaire it’s going to be the visual manifestation of a mystical energy that transcends to the viewer. This piece gathers people in a cozy environment from which a light will be generated while levitating above the audience.

numen / for use

tape sao paulo
file sao paulo 2016
Constant wrapping of pillars with a transparent adhesive tape results in a complex, amorphous surface through the process reminiscent of growing of organic forms. One line evolves into surface that forms an organic shape of extraordinary strength. The entrance of the audience inside the volume transforms the sculpture into architecture. It was practically “found” through the act of chaotic wrapping, where a one-dimensional line (“tape”) slowly turned into two-dimensional plane, which then finally curved into volume.

Pierre Boulez

Répons

“Oh yes, there is a metre, slightly irregular on one level but very regular on another. There are so many irregular things in this piece that at one point you need to have a regular metre as you say – a bass and a regular pulse anyway – but also a series of harmonies which are all symmetrical. The harmony always gives this impression of something followed by its inverse; there is always a centre – an axis of symmetry. This symmetry of harmony corresponds in harmonic terms to a regular metre. This is very important. There are three types of time. That which is chaotic and irregular such as you have in the beginning (in the speed I mean). Then you have, in the speed, the very regular rapid repeated notes – always in semiquavers. Finally at the end there is a regularity, a kind of metre – but with much ornamentation. The ornamentation is in fact very irregular, but the metre itself is very regular”. Pierre Boulez

Charles Sowers

Wave wall
A wall of 122 wind-activated pendulums are each magnetically coupled with its neighbors so that the whole wall moves as a slowly undulating surface similar to a large piece of fabric rippling in the wind. In winds greater than 15 knots, the wall’s coherent wave-like movement becomes more chaotic as the pendulums break their mutual magnetic coupling. The pendulums can also be manually activated.

 

Squarepusher

Nervelevers
if “Nervelevers” is anything to go by, Squarepusher’s upcoming album, Be Up A Hello, will be the closest thing we’ve had to vintage Squarepusher in years. This will be welcome news for many fans. Much like the best of Squarepusher’s catalogue, there’s a brilliant live quality to “Nervelevers.” His music often doesn’t sound like a single producer staring into a computer, but more like an incredibly tight jazz band, totally in sync. The track might not feature his virtuosic bass playing, but you can picture him slapping his bass guitar during its frantic acid line. You’re pulled through a chaotic wormhole, with only a brief respite when the glitched jungle drums break down to an almost hip-hop stagger. It’s fast, unpredictable, and most importantly, fun. Only a handful of artists can make music this complex feel like such a good time.

Quadrature

Orbits
“The aesthetics of man-made objects in space, their appearance and especially their orbits are transformed into a minimal audiovisual performance, showing the poetic dance satellites and their trash perform while revolving around us. Seemingly chaotic paths mutate to amazing patterns of an almost organic nature—all of it due to pure physical necessity. When we started working with global satellite data, their information was based on a website maintained by the US Air Force. Yet after some time, based on information from the Union of Concerned Scientists, we discovered that some objects were missing. Fortunately the data on classified satellites is generated by enthusiastic amateur astronomers observing the night skies.” Quadrature

Andreas Schmelas

Grid
Grid 4×4 is an autonomous apparatus that creates an endless series of geometric forms. The vertices of the form are located on discs, each of them rotatable by a motor. A computer software plays tenderly with the rotation of the discs and generates an endless amount of geometric and chaotic patterns.

Christina Kubisch

Cloud
Cloud, produced on-site at the museum using thousands of feet of red electrical wire, hosts a fourteen-channel composition that visitors listen to by wearing customized headphones. These devices, developed by the artist, contain magnetic coils that receive the magnetic fields circulating in the cable loops and make them audible. As visitors move around the installation, they look at the chaotic electrical wiring suspended in the gallery but hear the prerecorded sounds programmed into different segments of the sculpture.

Chris Salter

n-Polytope: Behaviors in Light and Sound after Iannis Xenakis
N_Polytope: Behaviors in Light and Sound After Iannis Xenakis is a spectacular light and sound performance-installation combining cutting edge lighting, lasers, sound, sensing and machine learning software inspired by composer Iannis Xenakiss radical 1960s- 1970s works named Polytopes (from the Greek ‘poly’, many and ‘topos’, space). As large scale, immersive architectural environments that made the indeterminate and chaotic patterns and behaviour of natural phenomena experiential through the temporal dynamics of light and the spatial dynamics of sound, the Polytopes still to this day are relatively unknown but were far ahead of their time. N_Polytope is based on the attempt to both re-imagine Xenakis’ work with probabilistic/stochastic systems with new techniques as well as to explore how these techniques can exemplify our own historical moment of extreme instability.

Greg Dunn

brain art
To capture their strikingly chaotic and spontaneous forms, the neurons in Self Reflected are painted using a technique wherein ink is blown around on a canvas using jets of air. The resulting ink splatters naturally form fractal like neural patterns, and although the artist learns to control the general boundaries of the technique it remains at its heart a chaotic, abstract expressionist process.

Jon Kessler

乔恩·凯斯勒
존 케슬 러
ジョン·ケスラー
ДЖОН КЕССЛЕР
Evolution

With his chaotic kinetic installations, Jon Kessler critiques our image-obsessed surveillance-dominated world. His machines are at once complex and lumbering, combining mechanical know-how with kitschy materials and images.

Philipp Artus

FLORA 2

The animation in FLORA is generated by overlapping sine waves that travel through a string of lines. This wave principle often appears in nature when energy is transmitted through a medium like water, air or simply a rope. It can also be observed in the locomotion of animals and human-beings, in which kinetic energy is transmitted successively through joints.
The FLORA algorithm of is based on the discovery that a simple system of rotating lines can create endless variations of abstract shapes – ranging from curved harmonious lines to edgy and chaotic patterns. The resulting aesthetics combine computational accuracy with an organic playfulness, and tend to trigger diverse associations in the mind of the viewer.

FILE FESTIVAL
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ARNE QUINZE

Арне Куинз
Chaos Life
The composition of a Chaos artwork started as a self-portrait; the representation of what’s going on in his head. But soon a shift occurred towards an enduring research on the definition of chaos in society. Often these artworks are filled with a mass of small wooden sticks attached to each other, looking enormously chaotic. “There’s no chaos, only structure” is a tagline in some of his work expressing his inner self and how he describes his thoughts. To him there is no chaos, everything is structured even in the chaos you find structure. There’s no such thing as chaos in Quinze’s world or at least not in the sense of how society defines chaos. Chaos does exist, as a form of structure. Chaos is irretrievably linked with life. In life everything is a matter of rhythm. Something without a rigid structure is part of the organic order in life.

PETER KOGLER

彼得·科格勒
Liquid
Peter Kogler`s works belong to the developing “post medial paintings” (Peter Weibl) in the 80`s. Moulded by the new media, these took on the complex form of installations. One of the main questions was the mental relationship between virtual and real space, as well as the perceptive possibilities of connection. The work, which reminds you of chaotic structures and Baroque dimensions, is based on the circularly moment of repetition, that consciously corresponds to the position of kunst Meran (pedestrian zone).

QUAYOLA

Captives
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

Lin Hwai-min

Formosa
“Formosa relies heavily on words and poetry for its inspiration and imagery. It traces Taiwan’s history from the 16th century, when Portuguese sailors upon seeing the island exclaimed, “Formosa!” meaning “Beautiful!” Poems appear on a white scrim above a white floor. In the beginning, the poems are whole. The black Chinese characters are neatly aligned. Gradually, however, the poems slide away and the characters enlarge, slowly disappear, become abstract, pour like a stream, peel away, and break apart. A chaotic jumble appears. To some extent, the writing dances.” Carmel Morgan

QUAYOLA

captives
“Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures, a contemporary interpretation of Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”.
The work explores the tension and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. Whilst referencing Renaissance sculptures, the focus of this series shifts from pure figurative representation to the articulation of matter itself. As in the original “Prigioni” the classic figures are left unfinished, documenting the very history of their creation and transformation.

John Russell and Joey Holder

TETRAGRAMMATON
A dialogue between these two artists on themes of myth, ritual and meaning, as much about their exhaustion and propensity to bewilderment as any potential they may inhere, for recuperation for and by language, culture and society.Joey’s work, ‘Religiously observant’, is inspired by alchemical and occult ideas, the world of spirits and hallucinations. The wall print features a gold CGI blazon of the Tetragrammaton It references the Sumerian mythology of the Annunaki a race of ancient chthonic fertility Gods, subsequently inscribed in a series of publications by Zecharia Sitchin (a kind of elder statesman of conspiracy theorists worldwide) as descendants of aliens, who enslaved the human race to extract gold from the earth.John’s work similarly ranges over territories of opposition: between ancient and contemporary; mythic and kitsch; between the viscid and primordial. It takes as its subject the vector of congealment, in the Marxist sense of the way labour power is congealed in commodities and so forth, extending this metaphor into an aesthetics of myth and ritual, emptied out, flattened, compacted like a sedimentary layer of anthropocene garbage, for the post-historical epoch.The sound component provides an aural complement to this structure of refuse, exhaustion and abjection. Mixing pre- or -post-linguistic utterances, grunts, groans, screaming: a kind of secular glossolalia chaotically interwoven with whalesong, deep techno and political oratory.

ART+COM

Mobility
The installation spans a corridor of 7-metres width. On the left wall one hundred prosthetic hands arranged in a matrix revolve around their own vertical axis, the movements being controlled by motors. The mirrors they hold reflect the beam of a strong light across the space and onto the opposite wall. What initially seems like an asynchronous, chaotic pattern of movement soon reveals itself as a complex, computational choreography: at first the hundred light spots move around a central point, akin to the celestial dynamics of the planets or the flight pattern of a swarm of insects and creating the impression of a three-dimensional space. Then suddenly this organic oscillation converges to form a Chinese character denoting movement and action.

JOYCE HINTERDING

Field and Loops

Loops and Fields, is a collection of drawings that resonate sympathetically to the electromagnetic fields within the gallery. These graphite drawings function as graphic antennas and explore the qualities and inherent nature of a combination of hand-drawn and mathematically generated forms. Delving into algorithmic structures, fractals and the chaotic nature of the hand drawn line, these drawings are an exploration of conductive materials and the possibilities for drawing electronic components. When connected to a sound system they make audible their interior activity and reveal the energy that exists in the immediate environment.Relying on the basic principles of the directional loop antenna, the drawings in Loops and Fields, like any receiving antenna, convert an electromagnetic wave into a voltage; the loop antenna is particularly sensitive to magnetic fields and outputs a voltage proportional to that field. Monitoring this activity allows us to experience the local fields and generates a site-specific and dynamic aural landscape.The different shapes and line qualities that make up the algorithmically generated and stencilled drawings come from thinking about the possibilities of extending a line. Fractal mathematics and the research into fractal antennas has focused on reducing the overall size and space an antenna needs to occupy. My interest is in the frequency range at the lower regions of the spectrum, where the wavelength is large; so my interpretation of recent antenna design research has led me to explore the possibilities for drawing antennas that can receive large wavelengths, on something the size of a standard piece of fine art paper.

Charles Atlas

Tornado Warning
Tornado Warning, draws from the filmmaker’s early memories of the tornado alerts in his childhood town of St Louis, Missouri. The piece contrasts an orderly space of grids and numbers with a chaotic environment of found images cut from old films, news footage, and the Internet. Ordinary objects fly around an empty room, swirling abstractions dominate the walls, and distorted bodies dance over images of radio waves. Seemingly in motion, the space of Tornado Warning appears unruly, alarming, violent and relentless.

LASAL

Harmophon

This video only shows a short part of a longer incoming installation, which explores the relationship between 2 Harmonic waves in different graphical/musical ways.98 pair of points trigger notes depending on the collision position in the Y axis.Panning depends on the X position. For this piece the phase and velocity of booth waves are synchronised to collide in a harmonic chord.In the installation it would be possible to see/hear more complex relationships with longer running time.The chaotic converges in harmonic, the complexity converges in simplicity.

MANUELA DONOSO AND LUISA PEREIRA

The Harmonic Series

File Festival

Created by Manuela Donoso and Luisa Pereira, The Harmonic Series is a collection of mechanical devices , software, sculptures and prints that explore the relationship between musical and visual harmony.Inspired by the nineteenth century mathematician Jules Lissajous who invented a device to visualize sound vibrations using two tuning forks and a beam of light reflected from one mirror to the next to a screen, Manuela and Luisa have re-created and extended this experiment using recent tools. An electronic version of the device replaces the tuning forks with microphones and speakers, allowing people to sing different musical intervals, and contrast the resulting figures with the more chaotic ones generated by percussive sounds. An application plays groups of three notes and plots 3d Lissajous figures for their frequency ratios. The frequency ratios for major, minor and diminished chords are 4:5:6, 10:12:15 and 20:24:29 respectively. These chords were plotted using the app, and then printed as posters and sculptures that reveal a tight relationship between aural and visual harmony.