SpY

ORB
The shape of the piece alludes to the ‘pi’ number concealed in the geometry of the Pyramids, found when dividing the perimeter of a Pyramid by twice its height. The sphere is an invisible part of the resulting geometry, since a sphere with a radius as high as the Pyramid would have a circumference very close in length to the Pyramid’s perimeter. The surface of the artwork captures the Pyramids, the sky, the surroundings and the viewers in a multiple fragmented reflection. It references the role of the circular mirror in historical Egyptian symbolism, where it was linked to the sun and conveyed notions of creation and rebirth.

olafur eliasson

Seeing spheres
Each of olafur eliasson’s seeing spheres supports a flat, circular mirrored face, framed by a ring of LED lights, which is oriented inward to reflect the mirrored faces of the surrounding spheres. Together they produce a surprising environment of multilayered, reflected spaces in which the same people and settings appear again and again, visible from various unexpected angles. Tunnel-like sets of nested reflections open up in the mirrors, repeating countless times and disappearing into the distance.

Olafur Eliasson

DET LYTTENDE SPEJL
Visitors to DNV-Gødstrup, a new hospital near Herning, Denmark, are greeted at the main entrance by an airy, round pavilion. Two curved pipes, crossing one another perpendicularly, hold a large disc aloft at a slight angle. The reflective underside of the disc mirrors the semicircular pipes, creating the illusion of two complete circles passing through the ceiling and rising into an imaginary space above. As visitors enter the pavilion, they can gaze up at their own reflections in the mirror and see themselves incorporated, upside down, into the artwork, embraced within the globe drawn by the pipes. The tilt of the ceiling allows the reflections to be seen from the outside. As the viewer moves towards and around the pavilion, the rings appear to shift in shape, changing from ellipses to circles and back again.

SUZAN DRUMMEN

kaleidoscopic crystal floor
dutch artist suzan drummen’s large-scale floor installations are mesmerizing and complex circular patterns made out of mirrors and brightly colored glass. the fractal-like arrangements feature ornate and elaborate circles growing exponentially out of each other and vibrant rings of spiraling colors winding into the surface of the floor. they are composed of crystals, chromed metal, precious stones, mirrors and optical glass. a sensory experience, and visually stimulating, the glittering installations play with the architecture of the space — climbing up walls and sweeping across the surfaces — examining the idea of illusion and optical effects.