Robert Henke

Destructive observation field
The installation behaves like a living organism, it creates expanding and contracting forms that have a semi-organic appearance. During the course of the exhibition the deformations of the plate add up resulting in a more and more complex surface structure. The visible shapes will get more detailed and fragmented. The density of the stored information on the black plate increases. The characteristic visual appearance of the installation is the result of interference patterns, waves amplifying and canceling each other out in space, leaving complex traces of light and darkness.

numen / for use

tape sao paulo
file sao paulo 2016
Constant wrapping of pillars with a transparent adhesive tape results in a complex, amorphous surface through the process reminiscent of growing of organic forms. One line evolves into surface that forms an organic shape of extraordinary strength. The entrance of the audience inside the volume transforms the sculpture into architecture. It was practically “found” through the act of chaotic wrapping, where a one-dimensional line (“tape”) slowly turned into two-dimensional plane, which then finally curved into volume.

Tatiana Plakhova

Antrum
The installation looks like a grotto of the membrane, the surface of which is inhabited by strange creatures. It’s complex structure causes association with living creatures, space objects and architectural constructions. In this frontier word pure mathematical abstractions are mixed with natural shapes, resulting in formation of new entities. Viewers can push the membrane and try to contact with them.

Behin Ha

TOGETHER APART BILLUND
Together Apart Billund consists of 375 coated mesh fabric ribbons stretched between the roofline of the Billund community building and the ground. Connected to the ground along an undulating line that curves in on itself, the ribbons create a series of cellular spaces. While the surface generated by the ribbons separates the individual spaces, its porosity provides visual interconnectivity between them. With the top and bottom anchoring patterns aligned symmetrically to the building facade, the installation is situated to have an axial relationship with surrounding buildings. The interplay between the linear top anchor positions and curved ground anchor pattern gives rise to differentiated and complex conditions of visual overlap, density, and transparency. The bright orange color of the installation creates a focal point and invites curious passers-by to interact with the work.

TIM HAWKINSON

蒂姆·霍金森
ティム·ホーキンソン
تيم هاوكينسون
Möbius Ship

The ambitious and imaginative structure of Hawkinson’s sculpture offers an uncanny visual metaphor for Melville’s epic tale, which is often considered the ultimate American novel. Möbius Ship also humorously refers to the mathematical concept of the Möbius Strip. Named after a nineteenth-century astronomer and mathematician, the Möbius Strip is a surface that has only one side, and exists as a continuous curve. Its simple yet complex spatial configuration presents a visual puzzle that parallels Hawkinson’s transformation of the mundane materials into something unexpected.

urbanscreen

320 degree licht

L’installation «320° Lumière» du groupe artistique URBANSCREEN, implanté à Brême, utilise comme point de départ la beauté et le caractère de cathédrale du Gazomètre pour créer un jeu fascinant de volumes et de lumière. Des motifs graphiques se développent et se transforment dans un rayon de 320 degrés sur la paroi intérieure du Gazomètre d’une hauteur de 100 mètres. Le spectateur assiste alors à une alternance entre un espace réel et un espace virtuel, le Gazomètre semble se dissoudre dans ses propres structures filigranes pour finalement retrouver continuellement sa forme distincte. «320 ° Lumière» est réalisée à partir d’une technologie de projection Epson. L’installation couvrant une surface de 20 000 mètres carré fait partie des projections intérieures les plus grandes et en terme de technique les plus complexes.

FELIX KLEIN

克莱因瓶
Klein’s bottle

The Klein bottle is a non-orientable surface; informally, it is a surface in which notions of left and right cannot be consistently defined.Simplifying things: A Möbius strip is a simpler example of a non-orientable object. That means it has no inside or outside. Add another aspect – having no boundaries – to it, it gets more complex and you end up with a Klein bottle.

Yihan LI

The design of a global atmospheric research center employs the sphere for both its iconic and volumetric qualities. . .
A set of spheres are repeatedly scaled, each tangent to the last, and dissected by orthogonal cuts to create distinctive spaces with both soft and hard thresholds that suit the unique functions of each program. The complex contains: simulation laboratories; a research lab; control center; administrative offices; auditorium; and maintenance and public spaces. Users enjoy a binary experience when inhabiting the convex and concave surface of the spheres as they circulate between them in a spiral manner. The contrast between orthogonal and spherical, in addition to material and atmospheric transformations, reflects and celebrates the nature of the building as a research institute studying the air of the future.

KIM JOON

韩国艺术家
김 준 예술가
КИМ ДЖУН
fragile mermaid

“Kim Joon uses the technique of “skinning” against perfected illusion and toward an erotic but uncanny dislocation. In doing so the artist undermines the value of conformity in both embodiment and consumption. These bodies are not sealed packages, they are uneven surfaces reflecting our conflicted self-creation—in the artist’s words, “multi-layered composites of desire and will, emotion and action, pain and pleasure of self and other… a complex system of complicit activities”

SANJAY PURI ARCHITECTS

bombay arts society
sanjay puri architects have designed ‘bombay arts society’ as a mixed-use building on a 1,300 square meter plot. half the complex’s programs is composed of office spaces, while the other half caters to visual and performance arts displays and creative studio space. three lower levels encased in an undulating concrete form house galleries and their allied functions, the seamless transitions between vertical and horizontal surfaces continuing inside the building as well as on the exterior. thus, patrons tour the museum, moving fluidly through an occupiable sculpture. slightly detached from the public realm below, a four-storey volume contains the arts society’s administrative offices.

Ralf Baecker

Putting The Pieces Back Together Again

The kinetic installation “Putting the Pieces Back Together Again” is a complex system with self-organizing and emergent behaviour, at the same time it is an artistic inquiry and meditation on contemporary scientific methodology. The installation investigates non-hierarchical communication and collective behaviour by implementing such a system physically through many electro-mechanical actors.
The Installation consists of 1250 stepper motors arranged in a two dimensional grid of two by two meters. Each motor is equipped with a pointer made from white acrylic glass. The radii of the pointers are chosen to intersect with the pointers of its neighbours. All motors are excited with the same alternating current that let them move initially in a random direction. Each actor is at the same time sensing its environment. In the event of a collision the pointers reverse their turning direction. This is achieved through a custom motor control circuit. Through the interplay of many entities a complex behaviour emerges on the surface of the installation. By manipulating the signals during runtime the system will form spontaneous pattern on its surface. It seems like they are negotiating it’s position with nearby actors. By this the system is showing behaviour of self-organization. The installation drifts through various activation levels during its run time by this it constantly evolves new formations and constellations (crystallization).

MARTIN KALTENBRUNNER

reactable
file festival

The ReacTable is a collaborative electronic music instrument with a tabletop tangible multi-touch interface. Several simultaneous performers share complete control over the instrument by moving and rotating physical objects on a luminous round table surface. By moving and relating these objects, representing components of a classic modular synthesizer, users can create complex and dynamic sonic topologies, with generators, fi lters and modulators, in a kind of tangible modular synthesizer or graspable fl ow-controlled programming language. The instrument was developed by a team of digital luthiers under the direction of Dr. Sergi Jordà. The “Interactive Sonic Systems” team works in the Music Technology Group within the Audiovisual Institute at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. Its main activities concentrate on the design of new musical interfaces, such as tangible musical instruments and musical applications for mobile devices. The reactable intends to be: collaborative: several performers (locally or remotely), intuitive: zero manual, zero instructions, sonically challenging and interesting, earnable and masterable (even for children), suitable for novices (installations) and advanced electronic musicians (concerts). The reactable hardware is based on a translucent, round multi-touch surface. A camera situated beneath the table continuously analyzes the surface, tracking the player’s fi ngertips and the nature, position and orientation of physical objects that are distributed on its surface. These objects represent the components of a classic modular synthesizer. The players interact by moving these objects, changing their distance, orientation and the relation to each other. These actions directly control the topological structure and parameters of the sound synthesizer. A projector, also from underneath the table, draws dynamic animations on its surface, providing a visual feedback of the state, the activity and the main characteristics of the sounds produced by the audio synthesizer.

DANIEL WHITE

Mandelbulb garden

The Mandelbulb is a 3-Dimensional representation of the boundary only – it is the surface of the object that is infinite. You don’t explore it by entering it, you simply ‘poke’ around the complex folds that make up the outer barrier. The more you poke around, the more stuff you find. That being said, Daniel White’s rendering of the object allowed for penetration of the structure revealing cross-sections of the bulb allowing us to look inside as well.

SUZAN DRUMMEN

kaleidoscopic crystal floor
dutch artist suzan drummen’s large-scale floor installations are mesmerizing and complex circular patterns made out of mirrors and brightly colored glass. the fractal-like arrangements feature ornate and elaborate circles growing exponentially out of each other and vibrant rings of spiraling colors winding into the surface of the floor. they are composed of crystals, chromed metal, precious stones, mirrors and optical glass. a sensory experience, and visually stimulating, the glittering installations play with the architecture of the space — climbing up walls and sweeping across the surfaces — examining the idea of illusion and optical effects.