Ke Jyun Wu

Clairvoyance
“Clairvoyance means the ability to perceive objects and matters beyond ordinary senses. We named this work as Clairvoyance because it perfectly describes the curiosity people have about the future. This grand artwork tells the story of how curiosity intrigues imaginations and improves technology, both of which urge people to move on.” Ke Jyun Wu

Whyixd

#define Moon_
[#define Moon_ ] consists of 9 rotating kinect light installations. It presents different postures of moon shape, exerting new sense experiences. The audience is allowed to explore through various ways of looking and bring curiosity to the installation by watching from different angles. By thinking of the science spirit, once again, viewer can define and understand the concept of this work of their own.

DI MAINSTONE AND TIM MURRAY-BROWNE

Serendiptichord

The result of a cross-disciplinary investigation spanning fashion, technology, music and dance, the Serendiptichord is a wearable musical instrument that invites the user (or movician) to explore a soundscape through touch and movement. This curious device is housed in a bespoke box and viewed as part of a performance. Unpacked and explored on and around the body, the Serendiptichord only reveals its full potential through the intrepid curiosity of its wearer. Adhering to the body like an extended limb, this instrument is best described as choreophonic prosthetic. Referencing the architectural silhouette of a musical instrument and the soft fabrication of fashion and upholstery, it is designed to entice the movician to explore its surface through touch, physical manipulation and expressive movement. Although this acoustic device can be mastered alone, it also holds subtle openings for group interaction.

Michael Hansmeyer

Subdivided Cube 4
At best, a computational approach enables architecture to be embedded with an extraordinary degree of information. Structure and surface can exhibit a hyper-resolution, with seemingly endless distinct formations. The processes can generate highly specific local conditions, while ensuring an overall coherency and continuity. As such, the resulting architecture does not lend itself to a visual reductionism. Rather, the procedures can devise truly surprising topographies and topologies, offering a thousand unique perspectives. Computational architecture can defy classification, it can evoke curiosity and elicit individual interpretations. The projects presented here forecast an exuberant architecture in which the exceptional supersedes the standard.

Diana Eng

Ham Radio Hacker
“Amateur Radio operators have shown an insatiable curiosity to explore and populate the high frontiers of the electromagnetic spectrum.” Not only that, but when disaster strikes, ham radio operators are usually called upon to provide and/or help emergency communications.
They’re not dependent on cell phone towers or overloaded systems in times of crisis; they’re distributed and long range. They help, they learn, and they share information. Diana is the type of person you need when you want to tap in to the space station to hear it go by or when you need to coordinate rescue plans when a hurricane drops in.

BIGERT & BERGSTRÖM

The Weather War
Bigert & Bergström is an artist duo living and working in Stockholm, Sweden. They met while at the art academy in Stockholm in 1986 and have collaborated ever since. Through their career B&B have produced and created art ranging from large-scale installations to public works, sculptures and film projects. Often with a conceptual edge, the core of their work is placed right in the junction between humanity, nature and technology. With energetic curiosity their art investigate scientific and social topics discussed in contemporary society.

Ingo Maurer

ZETTEL’Z 6
HOMAGE
R.I.P

Japanese paper, stainless steel, heat-resistant satin-frosted glass. Zettel’z Munari is a new limited edition of Zettel’z 5. With the illustrated alphabet by Bruno Munari, it is a perfect luminaire for rooms where children live, to be surrounded by creativity and the curiosity to explore language and learning. However, with its unique beauty, the limited edition is a pleasure for all ages. For Zettel’z Munari, Ingo Maurer received the permission of the publishing house Maurizio Corraini srl to use the alphabet by Bruno Munari.

thomas mailaender

Nude Museum
Thomas Mailaender (born 1979) is a French artist living and working between Paris and Marseille known for his use of a wide range of media and his experimentation with printing processes, fixing strange and humorous found imagery onto the surface of ceramics, photography and sculpture. The resulting objects teem with curiosity and a sense of the bizarre, pairing traditional, historical techniques with today’s prolific digital visual culture.

ken kelleher

Tropic of Capricorn
“I see sculpture as an ongoing dialogue between many things. Material, form, substance, light / shadow, time / space & content. Sculpture is curiosity made visible in three dimensions…with additional dimension or two added to it. The dimension of time, and one of imagination.”

Jeff Colson

Draped Column
Standing ten feet tall and suggesting an elegant obelisk as much as a shower curtain, this curious sculpture raises questions: Is this a functional object? What function is implied? The title refers to an architectural element or a memorial, but this totem defies gravity and it unclear what could be memorialized. Instead, it exists as a conundrum, a surreal manifestation of an object of the imagination that shouldn’t be able to exist, but does so with its imposing, tangible presence. Draped Column holds our attention and our curiosity as a fully realized poetic statement.

Matija Čop

Matija wanted to create garments that drew upon historical types without relying on traditional techniques of construction. He consciously abstained from knitting, sewing, or adhesion to develop an experimental system of fabrication: 3D scans of the body are manipulated using modelling software, transposed into 2D laser-cut patterns, and then rationalised through scripts into shapes that can be interlocked like puzzle pieces. The resultant object is a complex polyhedron without any seams. More significantly, the process that creates it is an entirely original variation of weaving with unlimited possibilities for novel design and new construction. Manually interlocking hundreds of unique laser-cut pieces with techno-couture craftsmanship, he makes ambitious and integrated thought tangible. Matija’s work aestheticises curiosity by striving constantly to authenticate the possibility of genuine innovation in contemporary fashion.

Anna Dumitriu

Cybernetic Bacteria

In the earliest stages of my work, I was intrigued by normal flora bacteria, the ubiquitous bacteria that live on us, in us, and around us. At the time this area was described as being of no commercial or medical interest – an ideal area for artistic research some might say! It threw into question for me the ways in which our scientific understanding of the world is limited by mundane things like finance, and how the limits of our understanding are drawn by factors other than curiosity.

video

MARSHMALLOW LASER FEAST MEMO AKTEN ROBIN

McNicholas and Barney Steel
Laser Forest

The public can explore the space, physically hitting, shaking, pulling and vibrating like trees for trigger sounds and lasers, provoking a very interactive collective experience. Resulting from the natural elasticity of the material, an interaction with the trees created with which they oscillate, creating patterns of vibration of light and sound. Each tree was tuned to a specific tone, creating harmonious children spatialized and played through a powerful surround sound system, and the more people, the cooler the experiment. The facility was designed to bring out in adults the feelings of curiosity and awe that are so vivid and evidence in children.

LEON THEREMIN

ליאון טרמין
레온 테레민
Лев Термен
théremin

he invented an electronic device known as the theremin, which was a unique musical instrument that could be played without physical contact. Rather than plucking strings or pressing keys, the musician need only move their hands around antennas located on the device.The device became a popular curiosity and he proceeded to tour Europe in order to demonstrate it. In 1928, he moved to New York City in the United States, where he played a theremin in the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in 1928. In 1929, he was granted a patent for the device by the United States. He decided to give RCA the rights to manufacture and sell the theremin for a lump sum payment and a percentage of the sales.In the early 1930s, Theremin purchased a laboratory in New York that he used for experimenting with electronic musical instruments. One of the products of his lab was the Rhythmicon, which was purchased by Henry Cowell, a composer. In 1930, a group of ten “thereminists” performed at Carnegie Hall.Theremin also began researching a method to cause lights and sound to respond to the movement of dancers. His system became popular with ballet and dance clubs throughout the country.

LIAM YOUNG

UNDER TOMORROW’S SKY
Eindhoven has a tradition to uphold when it comes to thinking about the future, with technology and design together playing the leading role. It was therefore inescapable that the English think tank Tomorrows Thoughts Today (TTT) would eventually find its way to Eindhoven. By now TTT has almost become part of the family.Not only did they contribute to the Great Babylon Circus at MU, with the intriguing ‘Landscape of unnatural history’, and conceive the luminous drones that performed an interactive choreography over the river Dommel during GLOW, but behind the scenes they also worked together with Philips Design on the Design Probes programme.This cooperation led to our curiosity about TTT’s many-sided practice and visions of the future being roused even further. More than any other they know how to link up contemporary, and in particular future-oriented thought on nature, urbanism, technology and culture, into inspiring and bizarre stories that tell us as much about the future as about the present day.