Dan Goods, Nik Hafermaas & Aaron Koblin

eCLOUD
The eCLOUD is a dynamic sculpture inspired by the volume and behavior of an idealized cloud. Made from unique polycarbonate tiles that can fade between transparent and opaque states, its patterns are transformed periodically by real time weather from around the world. It is a permanent sculpture between gates 22 and 23 at the San Jose International Airport and was a collaboration between Dan Goods, Nik Hafermaas, and Aaron Koblin.

Ann Veronica Janssens

Hot Pink Turquoise
Janssens’ works range wide, but they can all be described as sculptures that use the space as a stage for sensory activity. The simple white architecture of Louisiana’s South Wing becomes a resonating surface for Janssens’ both fragile and dizzying art – fragile because the works and their components are very simple while their effect elevates them above the material. Janssens herself often uses the word fluid to describe the effect of her works – even for example when they consist of a 6.5 metre long iron girder polished at the top so the room is reflected and it is hard to fix your gaze on the object. Janssens seeks no control of either works or viewers, for as the Dutch theorist Mieke Bal has said, Janssens’ artworks are at one and the same time object and event. Many of the works in the exhibition can evoke the sensation of standing at the threshold of something. They stress transitions and transformations between on the one hand a material level – evoked by glass, colour, liquids and not least light – and on the other hand a dynamic experience of time and space.

zach blas

sanctum
Zach Blas(United States、1981)の作品は、テクノクラート社会の限界と基盤を描くことを目的として、視覚言語の慣習、価値体系、デジタル技術に内在する力のダイナミクスをさまざまな文脈で分析、調査、配置しています。 。 彼の分析とデジタル文化への反映のために、彼は映画、彫刻、執筆、パフォーマンスなど、さまざまな表現形式を使用しています。 ブラスはブラックユーモアと理論的研究に取り組んでおり、彼の最も顕著な影響の中には、神秘主義の伝統、サイエンスフィクションのジャンル、ップカルチャー、クィアの美学があります。

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sanctum

The work of Zach Blas (United States, 1981) analyzes and explores the dynamics of visual language practices, value systems, and the forces inherent in digital technology in a variety of contexts, with the aim of depicting the limits and foundations of technocratic societies. I have placed it. .. For his analysis and reflection in digital culture, he uses a variety of forms of expression, including film, sculpture, writing and performance. Brass works on black humor and theoretical research, and among his most prominent influences are the mystical tradition, the genre of science fiction, pop culture, and the aesthetics of queer.

 

Patricia Olynyk

Oculus
Oculus is a large-scale, collaborative light sculpture that depicts a colossal abstracted drosophila eye, replete with compound faceted surfaces. It both recalls the circular opening at the apex of a cupola and alludes to a surveillance device or drone hovering in mid-air. Oculus is inspired in part by a series of scanning electron micrographs produced in a transgenic lab while researching human and non-human sensoria. The work evokes affective encounters with scale such as viewing miniature particles through the lens of a microscope or wandering through monumental physical environments. As each viewer’s reflection plays across the sculpture’s undulating surface, the apprehension of the self affects both individual and collective behavior in unexpected ways. This affective dynamic plays on the precariousness of our coexistence with other lifeforms in the world, one that is always contingent upon viewers’ bodies and the variability of the environment around them. The act of gazing at Oculus also puts into play the reciprocal condition of both seeing and being seen.

Josiah McElheny

Interactions of the Abstract Body
With ‘Interactions of the Abstract Body’ McElheny pushed these ideas further, creating a large and varied body of work that looks at how fashion and modernism have intersected and influenced each other, especially through the common language of the body. Crucially, McElheny animated this dynamic with the constant presence of a performer. By combining a continuous flesh-and-blood performance with static sculpture in the same gallery space, a first for White Cube, McElheny radically fractures the distinction between performance and exhibition.

GREYWORLD

The Source
The Source, an eight storey high kinetic sculpture, is the new symbol for the London Stock Exchange. Every morning, millions of viewers around the world will watch the installation come to life, signifying the opening of the London Markets.
“The Source is formed from a grid of cables arranged in a square, 162 cables in all, reaching eight stories to the glass roof. Nine spheres are mounted on each cable and are free to move independently up and down its length. In essence the spheres act like animated pixels, able to model any shape in three dimensions a fluid, dynamic, three dimensional television.Visitors to the atrium are greeted by this motion: its particles rising and falling, generating an infinite range of figurative and abstract shapes that rise, dissolve and reform at different heights in the atrium. The shape of the sun rising on a new day of trade, the names and positions of currently traded stocks, the DNA helix at the center of life formed by the work, and floating in the 32m void of the atrium.”

J. MAYER H.

于爾根·邁爾
يورغن ماير
위르겐 마이어
יורגן מאייר
ユルゲン・マイヤー
Юрген Майер
a f a s i a

The one hundred meter long Lazika Pier with its 31 meter high landmark sculpture is one of the first structures to mark the beginning of the development of this new metropolis. The sculpture is built out of 8mm steel plates. Exterior and interior lighting features will provide a dynamic and pulsating look to the sculpture

matthias koenig

The Sun never sets
His work is defined in sculptures, installations, drawings and music, but most of the time it‘s a symbiosis of these elements. His artistic practice is based on the creation of compositions with a specific acoustic and physical interaction, where form and sound coexist. The playful, unpredictable aspects of this interaction has his main interest. The specific qualities of music like tone, dynamics, rhythm, timbre and its swiftly immateriality create the poetic counterpart of the physical and visual.

Martin Kersels

Tumble Room
Mr. Kersels was born in Los Angeles and attended UCLA for both his undergraduate and graduate educations, receiving a BA in art in 1984 and an MFA in 1995. His body of work ranges from the collaborative performances with the group SHRIMPS (1984-1993) to large-scale sculptures such as Tumble Room (2001). His interest in machines, entropy, sound, and dissolution has produced work that examines the dynamic tension between failure and success, the individual and the group, and the thin line between humor and misfortune.

RACHAEL CHAMPION

Forced Landscape
Rachael Champion’s site-specific sculptures and installations are engaged in a discourse surrounding the dependant yet unclear relationship between industry, technology and nature. Her works consist of large scale constructions and dramatic architectural interventions that question the shifting interactions humanity has with the natural world and considers their boundaries, separations and progressive implications. Through manipulating information from diverse influences that include brutalist architecture, agriculture, raw materials, municipal infrastructure, public space and ecology, Champion questions the layered and dynamic complexities of our shifting physical environment.

Plastique Fantastique and Marco Barotti

SOUND of LIGHT
SOUND of LIGHT is a synesthetic sculpture which interprets and dynamically transforms sunlight into audio frequencies. It is a site specific installation designed for the former music pavilion in Hamm, Germany, which was built in 1912.

Chanjoong Kim

Cubrick

The Art Folly Cubrick by Chanjoong Kim is an interactive public space exhibited outside the walls of the Korean National Museum of Contemporary Art. A fusion between bricks and cubic forms, this abstract architecture piece is both artful and interactive.A spatial installation, this bold piece dares to test visual boundaries. A dynamically designed piece, the pavilion provides an intriguing experience for its visitors, showcasing a multitude of materialized textures. From stacked shapes to three-dimensional structural elements, this boldly built environment displays six different surfaces.With an aim to display high art outside of museum walls, The Art Folly Cubrick by Chanjoong Kim is an interactive sculptural piece few will soon forget. Gaining attention for all the right reasons, this spatial sculpture is all about art exploration.