David Spriggs

Vision II
David Spriggs’ Vision artwork series have a distinct focus on the senses. Accentuated by an affinity between its subject matter and the fragmentary nature of the medium, there is a tension created between form and emptiness. Appearing both as an implosion and as an explosion depending on the one’s perception, the viewer has the sense that he/she is observing a form in becoming, yet at the same time breaking down. The immersive experience created by Vision provides the audience with the impression that they are in the midst of witnessing an event, something of monumental proportions akin to the Big Bang. In changing viewpoints by navigating around the work, Vision is continually altered, breaking down at the sides so that the viewer can only see the edge planes of multiple sheets, begging the question: Is there in fact a form, or just individual images?

Marshmallow Laser Feast

Distortions in Spacetime
In a giant star’s final moments, atoms compress to a point where density becomes infinite, time stretches to a stop and the gravitational field is so strong that not even light can escape: a black hole. But the force that creates this dark shadow also spews out a supernova explosion of matter that can eventually coalesce to form planets, plants and people. In Distortions in Spacetime, visitors will see themselves reflected in this matter and will begin to understand the cosmic connection between black holes, dying stars and our very existence.

 

Fuse

Ljós
Ljós (Icelandic for ‘light’) has been conceived in continuity with the research carried out by fuse* in the field of digital and performative arts, which explores the deep connection between light, space, sound and movement. In Ljós, the performer is the means that allows the viewer to access a surreal and dreamlike space, a dimension with no gravity nor time, made by sounds and images reacting and interacting in real time. A shape-changing universe, which evolves from amniotic fluid in the beginning – protecting and supporting the performer – to the setting for violent explosions and transformations later – leading her to a direct contact with ground and Earth.

Maxim Zhestkov

Supernova
Supernova is an experimental 4K art film directed and designed by Maxim Zhestkov and made in Zhestkov. Studio Everything around and inside us was conceived in a huge explosion of a star billions of years ago… and, probably, recycled from other matrices myriad times. In this eternal carousel of matter, particles gather, form complicated structures and then burst into all directions fusing atoms together and producing new elements and points of view, new colours and patterns of perception.

JOSCHI HERCZEG AND DANIELE KAEHR

LAMP

Joschi Herczeg and Daniele Kaehr, originally from Switzerland, surprise the world of photography by capturing movement for the fraction of a second that makes up an explosion.To do this, the two friends used very specific pyrotechnic systems and have even create a custom detonator device, connected and synchronized directly to their camera.

CORNELIA PARKER

كورنيليا باركر
科妮莉亚·帕克
קורנליה פרקר
コーネリア·パーカー
코넬리아 파커
Корнелии Паркер
two rooms

For some years Cornelia Parker’s work has been concerned with formalising things beyond our control, containing the volatile and making it into something that is quiet and contemplative like the ‘eye of the storm’. She is fascinated with processes in the world that mimic cartoon ‘deaths’ – steamrollering, shooting full of holes, falling from cliffs and explosions. Through a combination of visual and verbal allusions her work triggers cultural metaphors and personal associations, which allow the viewer to witness the transformation of the most ordinary objects into something compelling and extraordinary.

JIM CAMPBELL

led-explosion

“Jim Campbell (b1956) is a San Francisco-based artist who has embraced the connections of light, space and time, as few others have. He uses LED technology and his skills in electrical engineering to masterfully achieve what Andrei Tarkovsky called “sculpting in time”. He introduces the illusions and our minds complete them.” DARRAN ANDERSON

TERRY RILEY

A Rainbow in Curved Air
Using overdubbing, Riley plays all the instruments on the title track: electric organ, 2 electric harpsichords (a Baldwin electric harpsichord & a RMI Rock-Si-Chord), dumbec, and tambourine. The piece moves through several sections; following the opening theme and introduction of “placid chords,” Riley introduces “an explosion, a procession of right-hand lines that flutter and pirouette over the over the pulsing rhythmic patterns.”

MARIKO MORI

ماریکو موری
森万里子
Мори, Марико
Tom Na H-Iu

Tom Na H-iu is a three-dimensional glass work almost 3 meters in height. It is networked to the Super Kamiokande neutrino observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, enabling it to interact and respond when the observatory captures a neutrino. On detecting a neutrino, such as those emitted by stars in our galaxy as they die in supernova explosions[…] Tom Na H-iu represents a modern standing stone that conveys the death of a star, meanwhile hinting at the birth that follows – as if to suggest to the viewer that our existence is in resonance with the universe. When we view this work that emits peaceful light amidst darkness, we can project ourselves into the darkness and gain a sense that we are standing quietly in the flow of eternal time.

CERN

Globe of Science and Innovation
History of the universe
Did you know that the matter in your body is billions of years old?

According to most astrophysicists, all the matter found in the universe today — including the matter in people, plants, animals, the earth, stars, and galaxies — was created at the very first moment of time, thought to be about 13 billion years ago.
The universe began, scientists believe, with every speck of its energy jammed into a very tiny point. This extremely dense point exploded with unimaginable force, creating matter and propelling it outward to make the billions of galaxies of our vast universe. Astrophysicists dubbed this titanic explosion the Big Bang.
The Big Bang was like no explosion you might witness on earth today. For instance, a hydrogen bomb explosion, whose center registers approximately 100 million degrees Celsius, moves through the air at about 300 meters per second. In contrast, cosmologists believe the Big Bang flung energy in all directions at the speed of light (300,000,000 meters per second, a million times faster than the H-bomb) and estimate that the temperature of the entire universe was 1000 trillion degrees Celsius at just a tiny fraction of a second after the explosion. Even the cores of the hottest stars in today’s universe are much cooler than that.
There’s another important quality of the Big Bang that makes it unique. While an explosion of a man-made bomb expands through air, the Big Bang did not expand through anything. That’s because there was no space to expand through at the beginning of time. Rather, physicists believe the Big Bang created and stretched space itself, expanding the universe.

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

Jonathan Monk

All The Possible Combinations Of Eight Legs Kicking
Intégrant mouvement, performance et imagerie, l’exposition explore les idées derrière le temps et la séquence, tandis que Monk interroge subtilement la compréhension du spectateur du passage du temps. Avec “Toutes les combinaisons possibles de coups de pied de huit jambes (une à la fois)” (2012-2013), Monk démontre la contrast entre la réalité clinique du temps et notre réaction spontanée. L’œuvre est une représentation littérale de son titre – car les jambes ont été programmées pour donner un coup de pied dans toutes les séquences possibles, soit un total de 40320 séquences différentes qui prennent plus de 177 heures à terminer. Contrairement à cette démonstration objective, le geste de donner des coups de pied est assez explosif, imitant les mouvements d’un danseur de cancan, et c’est cette explosion d’émotion qui met en évidence le suspense qui existe tout au long de l’œuvre. Alors que le spectateur est conscient que les jambes sont spécifiquement programmées pour donner un coup de pied à un moment précis, l’heure précise à laquelle cet événement se produit n’est pas donnée, créant une sorte de jeu de devinettes où le spectateur tente de prédire quand chaque coup de pied se produira, à chaque fois. individu ayant sa propre idée du moment où cela se produira.

ALLORA & CALZADILLA

Аллора и Кальсадилья
Under Discussion
…) Returning a Sound, 2004 und Under Discussion, 2005 wurden beide auf der Insel Vieques in Puerto Rico gedreht, als Teil der fortwährenden Beschäftigung der Künstler mit der Geschichte der Insel. Es wurde zwischen 1940 und 2003 von der US-Marine besetzt, die Land von den Inselbewohnern enteignete und sie zur Umsiedlung zwang. Während dieser Zeit wurde es als Militärbasis, Waffenteststelle und Munitionslager genutzt. 200.000 Quadratmeilen der umliegenden Gewässer wurden für Marineübungen verwendet und erfolgreich an ausländische Regierungen vermietet, als „einzigartige“ Gelegenheit für Live-Militärübungen. Vietnam, Korea, die Schweinebucht, die Balkankriege, Somalia, Haiti, die Golfkriege sowie die Kriege in Afghanistan und im Irak wurden in und um Vieques simuliert. Die Inselbewohner hatten unterdessen mit Schallverschmutzung durch ständige Explosionen, der Zerstörung von Land- und Meereslebensräumen, von Marineschiffen zerrissenen Fischernetzen und mit Napalm und Uran kontaminiertem Boden zu kämpfen. Angesichts ständiger ziviler Ungehorsamskampagnen gab das US-Militär im Mai 2003 schließlich seine Stützpunkte auf.