Bahar Yürükoğlu

Flow Through

“Flow Through takes as its departure point Bahar Yürükoğlu’s experiences during her travels to the Arctic Circle in 2015, both in the summertime, when the sun doesn’t set, and during the winter months, when darkness prevails. In the exhibition, the artist creates fictional spaces based on the dualities she observed in the Arctic region; blurring the boundaries between presence and absence, past and future, nature and civilisation, as well as cyclical movements and inevitable transformations, these installations, photographs and videos test the viewer’s perceptive capacities, and demand that the dichotomy between the subject and the object is set aside”. Duygu Demir

Jennifer Steinkamp

EON
“I considered the first life forms on Earth and how we came to be as a way to refer to the Natural Sciences. I looked at fossil records of the first multi cellular organisms of the Ediacaran Period, 555 million years ago for inspiration. I was struck by the theory of symbiosis in evolution; our DNA ancestors are the resultant fusion of single cellular organisms and bacteria. The millions of bacteria in our bodies are our foremothers. EON is a speculative fiction, a depiction of early life forms underwater. The Universe was formed 13.7 billion years ago. The Earth is 4.543 billion years old. Cyanobacteria or blue-green algae were the first microbes to create oxygen on Earth via photosynthesis 3.5 billion years ago. First humans 200,000-300,000 years ago.” Jennifer Steinkamp

ALICE HALDENWANG, LAURA COUTO ROSADO AND TINGTING ZHANG

Telepathy 2012-2112
“TELEPATHY” immerses the viewer in the heart of a fiction where telepathy would become the predominant means of communication at the expense of means of current communication. The ten glass helmets enable to visualize a telepathic communication, by definition invisible. “TELEPATHY” proposes to reverse the current trend which consists in basing its communication on technology, and in exchange it reveals the parapsychological and subjective communication of psychic phenomena.

Denis Villeneuve

Arrival

“Arrival’s narrative plays out in four languages: English, Mandarin, Russian and Heptapod. Though they are not spoken in the film, we learn that Louise is also fluent in Farsi, Sanskrit and Portuguese (and possibly others). The language learning process and the growing translingual bond between Louise and the heptapods forms the film’s narrative arc and the majority of its plot. Thus language, and specifically the mechanics of ←215 | 216→multilingualism, is Arrival’s central theme. Within this context, the ability to communicate across language barriers is an asset, and the flexibility to navigate new linguistic challenges is invaluable. The heptapods are pure science fiction, but serve a powerful metaphorical function. As Emily Alder (2016) writes in The Conversation, “ultimately, Arrival is less about communicating with the aliens than with each other – internationally but also individually […] The film’s message is that difference is not about body shape or colour but language, culture and ways of thinking. It’s not about erasing that difference but communicating through it”. Gemma King

Sonja Baumel

crocheted membrane

‘Crocheted Membrane’ experiments with creating a momentary fiction through fashion artifacts. Starting with the physical needs of one individual human body in an outdoor temperature of 10 degrees Celsius, seven hand-crocheted body forms were produced. The clothing’s texture got thinner or opened up completely on areas of the body that needed less warmth and were thicker where warmth was lacking. In this way, a fundamental change in the aesthetic and function of clothes was displayed. Fixed forms, such as trousers, were recreated into new, unique body forms. Instead of one uniform surface, the textures became alive and inimitable. “Her concept of clothing does not derive in the same way as most fashion design, from shape or historically patterned form with embedded social hierarchy and material richness, but is instead determined by the needs and sensations of the human body – performing in the same way that bacteria populations individually respond.” (Villeré 2014) The resulting fictional artifacts illustrate how we could use knowledge about our unique bacteria population to create a novel layer.

RAY KING

SolarSonic

Inspiriert vom alten chinesischen „Bi“, den neolithischen Jadescheiben mit einer zentralen Öffnung, die verwendet wurden, um über das Überschreiten der Erde zum Himmel zu meditieren, besteht “Solarsonic” aus 14 Linsen, die in der äußeren Glasdachstruktur des Terminals aufgehängt sind. Die Linsen – Eine einseitig mit holographischem lichtablenkendem Glas ummantelte Zugringstruktur – ist graduiert und durch 20 horizontale Kabel verbunden, die in einem Torroidmuster gewebt, gespannt und an beiden Enden an Verankerungen befestigt sind. Das gesamte 100 Meter lange Ensemble besteht aus King erinnert an einen segmentierten chinesischen Drachendrachen, der vom Rumpf des SST skaliert wurde. Bei der Entwicklung von Solarsonic wurde King an den Science-Fiction-Autor Sir Arthur Clarks Kurzgeschichte “Wind from the Sun” über ein Raumschiff erinnert, das von der Kraft von angetrieben wurde Sonnenlicht. Diese Methode der Raumfahrt wird Realität. Solarsonic gehört zu einer Reihe chromatischer Skulpturen von King, die für die Interaktion mit der Sonne entwickelt wurden. Die konkave holographische Linse der Skulptur Sie sind so positioniert, dass sie dem südlichen Meridian der Sonne zugewandt sind und nachts beleuchtet werden. Ray King ist ein Künstler, der die natürlichen Phänomene von Licht und Optik als Kunstmedium nutzt. Seit 1976 stellt er seine Arbeiten international aus. Große Installationen wurden in den USA, Europa und Asien in Auftrag gegeben – alle sind ortsspezifisch und vom umgebenden Raum und der Landschaft inspiriert.