Kutin | Kindlinger

ROTOЯ
The Rotor is equipped with a four channel speakersystem and a 360° camera. The artists control the speed of it’s rotation which directly influences the projected video-images as well as the sound-characteristics and the perception of the object itself. Acceleration & deceleration become main parameters, which enables the artists to compose an otherworldly piece that seems to follow it’s own logic. A strange communication between audio, video, object and light establishes itself and seduces the audience. There is the hypnotic movement of the sculpture while inevitable auditory and visual feedback is used as a central aesthetic element: The rotating speakers are amplified by static microphones, provoking complex feedback loops and patterns, that trigger psychoacoustic sensations.

JOSIAH MCELHENY

Interactions du corps abstrait
Avec “Interactions of the Abstract Body”, McElheny a poussé ces idées plus loin, créant un ensemble de travaux vaste et varié qui examine comment la mode et le modernisme se sont entrecroisés et influencés, en particulier à travers le langage commun du corps. Fondamentalement, McElheny a animé cette dynamique avec la présence constante d’un interprète. En combinant une performance continue en chair et en os avec une sculpture statique dans le même espace de galerie, une première pour White Cube, McElheny rompt radicalement la distinction entre performance et exposition.

zach blas

sanctum
Zach Blas(United States、1981)の作品は、テクノクラート社会の限界と基盤を描くことを目的として、視覚言語の慣習、価値体系、デジタル技術に内在する力のダイナミクスをさまざまな文脈で分析、調査、配置しています。 。 彼の分析とデジタル文化への反映のために、彼は映画、彫刻、執筆、パフォーマンスなど、さまざまな表現形式を使用しています。 ブラスはブラックユーモアと理論的研究に取り組んでおり、彼の最も顕著な影響の中には、神秘主義の伝統、サイエンスフィクションのジャンル、ップカルチャー、クィアの美学があります。

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sanctum

The work of Zach Blas (United States, 1981) analyzes and explores the dynamics of visual language practices, value systems, and the forces inherent in digital technology in a variety of contexts, with the aim of depicting the limits and foundations of technocratic societies. I have placed it. .. For his analysis and reflection in digital culture, he uses a variety of forms of expression, including film, sculpture, writing and performance. Brass works on black humor and theoretical research, and among his most prominent influences are the mystical tradition, the genre of science fiction, pop culture, and the aesthetics of queer.

 

Jonas Vorwerk and Yoren Schriever

Pixel
Les œuvres qu’il crée introduisent souvent des chevauchements surprenants et ludiques entre le physique et le numérique dans l’espace public, où ils sont confrontés à un large public. Ses œuvres ne sont pas destinées à être présentées dans l’espace traditionnel du cube blanc, mais plutôt dans des rues bondées, des festivals en plein air ou des paysages ouverts où elles deviennent un sujet à diverses influences, où elles peuvent non seulement être regardées mais aussi touchées et jouées. L’élément de participation est en fait souvent inhérent à la conception des installations de Vorwerk, qui sont complétées par l’engagement du public. Leur caractère organique leur permet de changer continuellement et d’être toujours influencés par le contexte dans lequel ils sont placés.

TEAMLAB

L’univers Cristallin Infini
Le pointillisme utilise une accumulation de points de couleur distincts pour créer une image. Ici, les points lumineux sont utilisés pour créer des objets tridimensionnels. La sculpture lumineuse s’étend à l’infini dans toutes les directions. Les gens utilisent leurs smartphones pour sélectionner des éléments pour lancer l’univers de cristal infini. Ces éléments renaissent en trois dimensions, créant l’œuvre d’art. La présence de personnes et leur emplacement dans l’œuvre affectent ces éléments tridimensionnels, qui à leur tour influencent et sont influencés par d’autres éléments de l’espace. Cette œuvre d’art est en constante évolution, changeant d’instant en instant en raison  des personnes présentes dans l’espace.

Richard Quinn

Moncler’s Genius Fall 2020
Since its inception, the Moncler genius project has asked designers coming from diverse cultures to create capsule collections inspired by the iconic Moncler puffer jacket. For his collection, london-based designer Richard Quinn visited the retro-futurism of the sixties. With clear influences like stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and Twiggy, the collection perfectly blends maximalism, bold colors and couture shapes. Of course, Quinn’s flower prints — part of his design DNA — were not left behind.

ROWAN CORKILL

Rowan Corkill is a 22 year old artist living in Fife, just outside St. Andrews. A recent graduate of Gray’s School of Art (BA Hons in Photography and Electronic Media), he prefers not to be asked anything about cameras as “I wouldn’t have a clue”!

Ever since seeing the work of Marcel Duchamp Joseph Cornell and Richard Rosenberg he was immediately fascinated by the use of everyday objects. This became a reoccuring aspect in his own work and whilst in second year at Gray’s a vernacular photography project opened up the idea of using found pictres – artists Richard Prince and Christian Boltanski becoming huge influences.

MATTHEW MONAHAN

ماثيو موناهان
마태 복음 모나한
マシュー・モナハン

Matthew Monahan’s work presents a futuristic archaeology. Drawing from a wide range of influences, from Modernist art to ancient totems, Monahan’s ‘artefacts’ are both familiar and strange. Filtering historical mythologies through his own personal system of reference, altered further through the experience of making, Monahan’s work alludes to a contemporary spirituality, where beauty and brutality coalesce as virtual monuments.

Vittorio Giorgini

Walking Tall
Walking Tall was a skyscraper designed for New York in 1982-1983. The building, which was intended to rise to a height of more than 250 meters, employs asymmetric tetrahedral elements and is structurally reminiscent of utopian blueprints of the Soviet constructivist architectures of the 1920′s. Giorgini kept long-lasting friendships with the artists Jean Arp and Roberto Matta. The former artist may have left his biomorphic influences on Giorgini’s early topological architectures, while the latter artist’s dynamic three-dimension ‘inscape’ spaces may well be connected to Giorgini’s later angular works.

RACHAEL CHAMPION

Forced Landscape
Rachael Champion’s site-specific sculptures and installations are engaged in a discourse surrounding the dependant yet unclear relationship between industry, technology and nature. Her works consist of large scale constructions and dramatic architectural interventions that question the shifting interactions humanity has with the natural world and considers their boundaries, separations and progressive implications. Through manipulating information from diverse influences that include brutalist architecture, agriculture, raw materials, municipal infrastructure, public space and ecology, Champion questions the layered and dynamic complexities of our shifting physical environment.

Stephanie van Zwam

airborne
Zephyrus Wings

The collection investigates how air influences the form of a wearable object. Some pieces use enclosed air, some use the movement of air, and some use the static of air . They invite the viewer or wearer to discover the changes and take part in the performance.

Judith Hoffman

Sears Kit: The American Dream
Blending art with design, paper and a little imagination, artist Judith Hoffman builds her own ‘castles in the air.’ Think children’s paper and cardboard cities, all grown up. “Environment is the central factor in my work. My surroundings and the complexities of location are heavy influences in what I build,” she says.

KAREN RYAN

קארן ראיין
卡伦瑞安
카렌 라이언
カレン·ライアン
Карен Райан

“Necessity, fate, autobiography and subversion are the key influences upon my practice. I use materials that are provided as a product of continuous waste driven by mass consumption and fashion. There are enough mass produced chairs in this world: I collect discarded and unwanted ones from the street, car boot sales, jumble sales, second hand shops and charity shops[…]”

Laurie Spiegel

the expanding universe
The Expanding Universe is the classic 1980 debut album by composer and computer music pioneer Laurie Spiegel. The pieces comprising The Expanding Universe combine slowly evolving textures with the emotional richness of intricate counterpoint, harmony, and complex rhythms (John Fahey and J. S. Bach are both cited as major influences in the original cover’s notes), all built of electronic sounds. These works, often grouped with those of Terry Riley, Phil Glass, Steve Reich, differ in their much shorter, clear forms. Composed and realized between 1974 and 1977 on the GROOVE system developed by Max Mathews and F.R. Moore at Bell Laboratories, the pieces on this album were far ahead of their time both in musical content and in how they were made.

Catherine Chun Hua Dong

red baby

Red Baby consists of 30 staged photographs depicting a family of mixed race parents and a child. I painted my body red, wearing a diaper and fake mouthpiece, and I lived with strangers hired from Craigslist for eight hours in a red room, as their child. They were asked to feed me, play with me, pamper and take care of me. In this work, the “red baby” is a symbol for contemporary China, caught between east and west. The baby, symbolic of both communist and capitalist influences, is also a future model for social transformation, imagining a new utopia.

Szilárd Cseke

Multiple Identities, Sustainable Development
The focus is on multiple identities. There are pale, milky plastic pipes attached to the ceiling of the concrete interior, inside which, moved by fans, roll white balls. One after the other. If the one arrives, a new one is sent to another tube.Such works breathe inner unity. This closeness is sometimes a closeness, if not encryption. Because the language of contemporary installation art is foreign and difficult to read. The viewer’s gaze likes to evaluate subjectively and is always shaped by environmental influences such as culture, trends, styles, beliefs, experiences and politics. This makes the interpretation uncertain, it becomes subjective, often tempting to misconduct. Because anyone who claims that the work of art is created in the eye of the beholder and means that everyone, regardless of where they come from and how educated, can make a valid statement about a work of art is wrong. What Marcel DuChamp meant is that it unfolds in the eye of the beholder. But this development should not mean that simply opening the eyes also brings with it knowledge and insight. These qualities are developed through active participation, through perception. This, in turn, is not only feasible through the visual stimulus in the eye. It is possible, however, if you know who the artist is, what he is doing, what he wishes to express and with which underlying design principles the view is guided in what way to what. Only then does the processing take place, a connection of the causal relationships, which ultimately leads to art in the eye of the beholder. To an inner feeling outside of the spontaneous feelings.

XAVIER LE ROY

Self Unfinished

French choreographer Xavier Le Roy defies categorisation as a dance-maker, drawing on diverse influences from the worlds of science, performance art and contemporary dance.
In Self Unfinished (1998), Le Roy takes the audience on a journey of metamorphosis as he transforms into an extraordinary hybrid creature part machine, part alien, part human.
Employing all manner of physical devices, Le Roy creates a world of illusion that is as unsettling as it is transfixing.

Joon Y. Moon

Augmented Shadow
File Festival

Augmented Shadow is a design experiment producing an artificial shadow effect through the use of tangible objects, blocks, on a displayable tabletop interface. Its goal is to offer a new type of user-experience. The project plays on the fact that shadows present distorted silhouettes depending on the light. Augmented Shadows take the distortion effect into the realm of fantasy. Shadows display below the objects according to the physics of the real world. However, the shadows themselves transform the objects into houses, occupied by shadow creatures. By moving the blocks around the table the user sets off series of reactions within this new fantasy ecosystem. In this installation, the shadows exist both in a real and a virtual environment simultaneously. It thus brings augmented reality to the tabletop by way of a tangible interface. The shadow is an interface metaphor connecting the virtual world and users. Second, the unexpected user experience results from manipulating the users’ visual perceptions, expectations, and imagination to inspire re-perception and new understanding. Therefore, users can play with the shadows lying on the boundary between the real, virtual, and fantasy. Augmented Shadow utilizes this unique interface metaphor for interactive storytelling. Maximizing the magical amusement of AR, it is embedding an ecosystem where imaginary objects and organic beings co-exist while each of them influences on each other’s life-cycle, even though it is not in use by users. Light and shadow play critical roles in this world’s functions causing chain reactions between virtual people, trees, birds, and houses. A set of tangible blocks allows users to participate in the ecosystem. Users can influence on the system by playing with the blocks or observe the changes of the shadows as if kids were playing with an ant farm.