BarabásiLab

Hidden Patterns
The co-citation network for Nature: more than 88,000 papers published by the journal since 1900 are each represented by a dot, coloured by discipline. Papers are linked if another scientific paper (of those indexed in the Web of Science) cites both; the dot size reflects the number of these co-citation links.
Invisible, hidden connections and constantly repeating patterns within nature, society, language, and culture can not only be explored but also made visible. Barabási’s network approach promises to deliver a comprehensive, universal method that will illuminate many phenomena with scientific precision.

Alisa Andrasek

Cloud Pergola
Inspired by the cloud formations and weather events, this mathematized cloud plays with visitor’s perception. Movement through the structure generates a series of dynamic interference views in its deep fabric, drifts and ruptures in visibility. A sea of redirecting vectors is pulling the visitor like an invisible gravity force through the fabric.

Jesper Just

CORPORÉALITÉS
Corporealités is a large-scale work exploring the autonomy of ballet through the immersive elements of sculpture and video. At the heart of a piece is Just’s film, displayed across a series of LED-panels strewn about the space, where close up shots of dancers from the American Ballet Theatre show their bodies affixed to electrotherapy patches. As the muscles displayed on the panels contract, notes of Fauré’s Op. 50 seem to play in tandem, providing an ominously invisible link between the film and physical space.

Berenike Corcuera

Berenike Corcuera’s collection was inspired by kirilian photographs of her aura, first captured in Chinatown’s reowned Magic Jewelry. when she lived in New York in 2014. She began studying the electromagnetic field of the human body to understand how to translate the invisible. She began the practice of mandala and colour studies, to understand how metaphysical bodies could be interpreted into physical bodies and contemporary menswear clothing.

ANDREI TARKOVSKY

أندريه تاركوفسكي
塔可夫斯基
アンドレイ·タルコフスキー
Андрей Тарковский
Solaris
In Solaris (1972), Andrei Tarkovsky presents a vision of contemporary society as one that has become cut off from nature, and provides a narrative that illustrates the possibility of remaining human in the inhuman world that is the result. The film contrasts a life-affirming natural landscape to an urban, constructed landscape where the natural world is submerged and invisible. The Solaris space station is both a projection of this second, inhuman, landscape and an allegory for Tarkovsky’s view of urban life. The narrative of the film concerns the journey by the central character, Kris Kelvin (Donatas Banionis), from emotional deadness to a rediscovery of his humanity as he charts a course between these two worlds, and the role that art, whether painting, music or film, plays in this.
cinema full

Yonakani: Young ah Seong, Takuji Narumi & Tomohiro Akagawa

Thermotaxis
file festival
The term “Thermotaxis” signifies a movement of a living organism in response to heat stimulation. A thermal spot has power to encourage people to gather together like open fires in winter or water places in summer. The work “Thermotaxis” characterizes the open space as invisible thermal spots by providing people with thermal information. Our work aims to create a new spatial structure for communication not by architectural approach but by using information technology.

GUTO NÓBREGA

Breathing
File Festival
Breathing is a work of art based on a hybrid creature made of a living organism and an artificial system. The creature responds to its environment through movement, light and the noise of its mechanical parts. Breathing is the best way to interact with the creature.
This work is the result of an investigation of plants as sensitive agents for the creation of art. The intention was to explore new forms of artistic experience through the dialogue of natural and artificial processes. Breathing is a pre-requisite for life, and is the path that links the observer to the creature.Breathing is a small step towards new art forms in which subtle processes of organic and non-organic life may reveal invisible patterns that interconnect us.Breathing is a work of art driven by biological impulse. Its beauty is neither found isolated on the plant nor in the robotic system itself. It emerges at the very moment in which the observer approaches the creature and their energies are exchanged through the whole system. It is in that moment of joy and fascination, in which we find ourselves in a very strange dialogue, that a life metaphor is created.Breathing is the celebration of that moment.

ERNESTO KLAR

Эрнесто Клар
Convergenze parallele

Convergenze parallele is an audiovisual installation in which airborne dust particles passing through a beam of light are tracked, visualized, and sonified in realtime by a custom software system. The installation reacts to air movements in the exhibition space, allowing the viewer to see and hear the amplified movement of dust particles. “Convergenze parallele” explores the poetic potential of revealing and transforming the imperceptible. The custom software uses a video camera to capture the activity of dust articles passing through the beam of light. It then analyzes the video signal to track the location of individual dust particles, and reveals each particle’s trajectory in the image-processed projection. The physical particles draw traces of their otherwise invisible motion on the digital screen. At random intervals, the software artificially saturates the system by briefly activating the fan-a cloud of dust fills the beam of light and creates dense and stunning patterns of particle trajectories and sound.

File Festival

JULIUS VON BISMARCK

versuch unter kreisen

This is the artistic result of a residency spent at CERN, where particles circulate on rings at great speed. The four lamps that are suspended from the ceiling also describe circles, but at varying speeds. Starting from there, every imaginable choreography is possible as well as every interpretation. The lamps describe figures that imperceptible transitions trigger one to the other. According to the artist, it’s only a question of mathematics here, though one asks oneself which one of the four incandescent lamps directs the others. And just as quick as they come into alignment as though linked by invisible ties, there is one that seems to accelerate while another can’t manage to keep up with the group. You can watch them for hours on end, hypnotised by the aesthetic beauty of physical laws. The artist, Julius von Bismarck, when receiving his prize admitted to having learned a lot at the CERN. It is likely that the scientists were also marked by his presence.
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Iris van Herpen

Transmotion
The term transmotion not only depicts the process of change from one state, form, style or place to another, it is also the visionary perceptions of the seasons and the visual scenes of motion in art and literature. In parallel to Iris van Herpen’s drive to visualise the invisible, her quest to question reality and urge to explore the realms of impossibility, the project aims to narrate the process that ushers change, to materialise an unconscious state of meditation.

Paul Cocksedge

Freeze Multi Circle Table
In Freeze, Cocksedge exploits freezing temperatures to create a seamless bond between metals that otherwise do not adhere in nature. The breakthrough in the series – a table of copper and aluminum – was made by first burying four copper legs in snow, leaving them to contract by 100th of a millimeter; second, excavating the legs and inserting them into holes cut into an aluminum slab where they were allowed to un-freeze back to ambient temperature thereby firmly locking into place in a strong, invisible join.

WILMA HURSKAINEN

waves
“The latter image, Waves, was taken in Benin, West Africa last winter where I spent a lot of time on the beach, just looking at the ocean and thinking. I had the skirt made for it after I once realized my shirt was the same color as the ocean. Although the two images share the same idea, for me the’re very different: In Invisible the woman looks hollow whereas in Waves it’s as if the landscape grew through her.”