Katharina Grosse

It Wasn’t Us

A painting by Katharina Grosse can appear anywhere. Her large-scale works are multi-dimensional pictorial worlds in which splendid color sweeps across walls, ceilings, objects, and even entire buildings and landscapes. For the exhibition “It Wasn’t Us” the artist has transformed the Historic Hall of Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin as well as the outdoor space behind the building, into an expansive painting which radically destabilises the existing order of the museum architecture.

marc quinn

We Share Our Chemistry With the Stars (XX200)
The works measure two metres across, with Quinn describing them as ‘stealth portraits’, at once unique and universal and not just an image of the sitter, but an actual visual index of their identity. Using a macro-lens, Quinn captures the sitter’s iris in incredible detail and then uses an airbrush technique to apply oil paint onto canvas, transforming the images into these large-scale works. The eye appears virtually abstract and the pupil appears like a aperture or hole in the centre of a fine, detailed network of colourful lines.more

BIGERT & BERGSTRÖM

The Weather War
Bigert & Bergström is an artist duo living and working in Stockholm, Sweden. They met while at the art academy in Stockholm in 1986 and have collaborated ever since. Through their career B&B have produced and created art ranging from large-scale installations to public works, sculptures and film projects. Often with a conceptual edge, the core of their work is placed right in the junction between humanity, nature and technology. With energetic curiosity their art investigate scientific and social topics discussed in contemporary society.

CAJSA VON ZEIPEL

Cajsa von Zeipel works in a large-scale format with explicit references to fashion as well as to the masters of the Renaissance. She models her over-dimensioned sculptures in Styrofoam and the final form is covered by a layer of plaster.

JON RAFMAN

New Age Demanded
“Inspired by classical Greek busts, Jon Rafman uses computer software to digitally render three-dimensional forms. The forms act as the structural surface on which two-dimensional Internet-sourced images are applied. The series is presented as large-scale archival pigment digital prints. Each print is created with its own specific texture and sculptural mutation. Rafman uses historically recognizable works from canonized artists like Mark Rothko, Georgia O’Keeffe, Piet Mondrian, and Wassily Kandinsky as the subjects of his appropriations.”

Maya Lin

Folding the Chesapeake
Maya Lin has maintained a careful balance between art and architecture throughout her career, creating a remarkable body of work that includes large-scale site-specific installations, intimate studio artworks, architectural works and memorials.

MONICA BONVICINI

NEVER AGAIN
Since the nineties, artist Monica Bonvicini has confronted audiences with drawings, installations, videos, and photographs that explore the construction of sexual identity through architecture. Her large-scale sculptural works provoke modernism with sheets of shattered glass and non-functional metal scaffolds and include feisty sexual references with strategic placement of riveted black leather.

MIKE NELSON

迈克·尼尔森
Mike Nelson (b. 1967) is one of the most appreciated artists of his generation. His work predominantly features sculpture and meticulously constructed, large-scale architectural installations. In this new work created for Malmö Konsthall, Nelson uses the institutional architecture as a backdrop for a massive concrete workshop. The exhibition space is divided by a glass wall into two spaces; a smaller production workshop and an exhibition space stripped back to its original configuration.

CAJSA VON ZEIPEL

Cajsa von Zeipel works in a large-scale format with explicit references to fashion as well as to the masters of the Renaissance. She models her over-dimensioned sculptures in Styrofoam and the final form is covered by a layer of plaster.