QUAYOLA

Natures
“…explore the dialogue between the natural and the artificial”, connecting footage of plants moving in the wind with line structures tracked on top”. Mate Steinforth

ESTHER STOCKER

ЭСТЕР СТОКЕР
에스더 스토커
以斯帖施特克尔
In addition to painting on the usual canvas, Esther Stocker creates her minimal abstract work on entire rooms and structures. The Italian artist has been creating her black and white installations and wall works since 2001, which have been exhibited all over the world. Esther uses stark geometric lines to create a shaken sense of depth perception and spatial uncertainty in the eyes of the viewer, to which she simply explains: “Control is always what we do not have. This is the human condition.”

Skylar Tibbits and Arthur Olson

The Self-Assembly Line
Can we create objects that assemble themselves — that zip together like a strand of DNA or that have the ability for transformation embedded into them? These are the questions that Skylar Tibbits investigates in his Self-Assembly Lab at MIT, a cross-disciplinary research space where designers, scientists and engineers come together to find ways for disordered parts to become ordered structures.

Manfred Mohr

Cubic Limit
In «Cubic Limit,» Mohr introduces the cube into his work as a fixed system with which signs are generated. In the first part of this work phase (1972–75), an alphabet of signs is created from the twelve lines of a cube. In some works, statistics and rotation are used in the algorithm to generate signs. In others, combinatorial, logical and additive operators generate the global and local structures of the images.

KYLE DUNN

КАЙЛ ДАНН
A Bunch of Heavy Lines

The liveliness of buildings and stationary structures at the Headlands is a major draw and source of influence for my work. I have noticed that architectural elements of my studio in the basement of building 960 formed an interesting dialogue with my pursued work.

DESIGN STUDIO EMERGING OBJECTS

设计工作室新兴对象
Saltygloo
American studio Emerging Objects 3D-printed this pavilion using salt harvested from San Francisco Bay. “The structure is an experiment in 3D printing using locally harvested salt from the San Francisco Bay to produce a large-scale, lightweight, additive manufactured structures,” said Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello of additive manufacturing startup Emerging Objects. They explained that 500,000 tonnes of sea salt are harvested each year in the San Francisco Bay Area using power from the sun and wind. “The salt is harvested from 109-year-old salt crystallisation ponds in Redwood City,” they said. “These ponds are the final stop in a five-year salt-making process that involves moving bay water through a series of evaporation ponds. In these ponds the highly saline water completes evaporation, leaving 8-12 inches of solid crystallised salt that is then harvested for industrial use.”