NOIZ

SHIBUYA HYPER CAST. 2
Shibuya Hyper CAST. 2 is a showcase of most cutting-edge urban innovations combined into one building. Shibuya CAST., an existing development designed by noiz, has been an urban lab of mixed function and culture located in the middle of one of the hottest areas in Tokyo. This hypothetical project has started for the 5-year memorial celebration of the CAST., to project future possibility of the building, the area, our society, and potentially a form of future city. It demonstrates how cities of the future could be structured and operated. The project is based on urban studies in the area of mobility, social welfare, administration, funding, security, sustainability and more. Shibuya Hyper CAST. 2 translates the best features of vibrant downtown districts into vertical language of ever-growing cities of the future.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg & Phillip Andrew Lewis

Spirit Molecule
Spirit Molecule II, engages local community members as DNA donors to be memorialized in a site-specific commission for the Broad Museum at Michigan State University, created in collaboration with University scientist Dr. Bjoern Hamberger. The work consists of a large mound of moss growing in the gallery, with four embedded cylinders containing genetic memorial plants. In this iteration we embed both human DNA and a gene for the scent of patchouli into lab-strain moss Physcomitrella patens.

Francisco Larios Osuna

Etnomats 001
Francisco Larios es un artista multidisciplinario (México, 1960) cuyo trabajo despuntó en la década de los noventa. Larios ha practicado la pintura, el dibujo de concepto abierto, el uso de “software” para crear entornos visuales bidimensionales y tridimensionales. En su imaginario se cumple la condición postmoderna, en la que la cultura contemporánea es el punto de arranque para la elaboración de escenas que manifiestan un retorno a referentes sacros, temáticas filosóficas y fabulaciones inmemoriales.

Jeff Colson

Draped Column
Standing ten feet tall and suggesting an elegant obelisk as much as a shower curtain, this curious sculpture raises questions: Is this a functional object? What function is implied? The title refers to an architectural element or a memorial, but this totem defies gravity and it unclear what could be memorialized. Instead, it exists as a conundrum, a surreal manifestation of an object of the imagination that shouldn’t be able to exist, but does so with its imposing, tangible presence. Draped Column holds our attention and our curiosity as a fully realized poetic statement.

Maya Lin

Folding the Chesapeake
Maya Lin has maintained a careful balance between art and architecture throughout her career, creating a remarkable body of work that includes large-scale site-specific installations, intimate studio artworks, architectural works and memorials.

PAOLA GAETANO-ADI

Desiring Machine: and/or the female reincarnation of Sisyphus
Née en Argentine, Paula Gaetano Adi est artiste et chercheure dans les domaines de la sculpture, de la performance, et des installations interactives et robotiques. Elle utilise le corps humain et non humain comme point de départ de ses recherches, et s’intéresse aux effets discursifs et aux impacts affectifs des technosciences sur la subjectivité humaine et dans l’art. Ses œuvres ont été présentées sur la scène internationale à Beijing, Berlin, Madrid, Moscou, Stockholm, São Paulo, New York, Poznan et Buenos Aires, entre autres. Elle a reçu de nombreux prix et bourses, tels que le premier prix à la compétition VIDA 9.0 sur l’art et la vie artificielle, organisée par la Fundación Telefónica, et le premier prix LIMbØ du Musée d’art moderne de Buenos Aires, la bourse Fergus Memorial en 2009 et 2010 de même que la bourse accordée à un artiste ibéro-américain dans le cadre de la compétition VIDA 14.0. À l’heure actuelle, Paula Gaetano Adi est professeure adjointe dans le programme de Studio Art du College of Visual Arts and Design de l’Université de North Texas, où elle coordonne le secteur réservé aux nouveaux médias. À cette université, elle s’est également jointe au groupe Initiative for Advanced Research in Technology and the Arts (iARTA).

Kevin Beasley

Strange Fruit
Using both sculpture and musical performance in his practice, Kevin Beasley explores the physical materiality and cultural connotations of both objects and sound. His sculptures typically incorporate everyday items like clothing, housewares, or sporting goods, bound together using tar, foam, resin, or other materials. Often they also contain embedded audio equipment that warps and amplifies the ambient tones of their surroundings. For Storylines, Beasley has created two new works specifically for the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. Within this vast and open sonic environment, Strange Fruit (Pair 1) and Strange Fruit (Pair 2) (both 2015) offer an experience of intimacy, absorbing and reflecting the sound of the crowd at the scale of a personal conversation. Each work embodies this spirit of dialogue in its two-part structure—at its core are two athletic shoes, one merged with microphones, the other with speakers. Suspending these objects in space, Beasley compounds their technological interchange with additional layers of meaning, bringing to mind the urban phenomenon of shoes hanging from overhead wires or poles (itself an open-ended form of communication). At the same time the works’ titles refer to history of lynchings in the American South memorialized by Bronx schoolteacher Abel Meerepol in the 1937 protest song “Strange Fruit.” In these contexts, the hanging forms of Beasley’s sculptures resonate not only with his body, which molded them by hand, or with the bodies moving through the museum, but also with those inscribed in the problematic history of race and class in the United States.

Beomki Lee

[ME]morial – Memorial architecture for the individual
VIA HIGHLIKE SUBMIT

AMALIA PICA

아말리아 피카
АМАЛИИ ПИКИ
Memorial for intersection

SUNYUAN & PENGYU

孙原和彭禹
ВС Юань и Пэн Юй
Old persons home
Sun was born in Beijing and Peng in Heilongjiang. Sun and Peng are contemporary conceptual artists whose work has a reputation for being confrontational – they have previously used live animals in their installations. As their contribution to the 2005 Venice Biennale, the duo invited Chinese farmer Du Wenda to present his home-made UFO at the Chinese Pavilion.They won the Contemporary Chinese Art Award in 2001. Their 2009 solo exhibition, “Freedom”, at Tang Contemporary in Beijing, was seen by some critics as a memorial to the Tiananmen Square incident. The installation featured a large fire-hose hooked to a chain that erupted water spray at a distance of 120 meters.

URS FISCHER

Урс Фишер
nomadic art tent
The nomadic sculpture that Urs Fischer created for Station to Station is something of a steamy interior dreamscape, a glittery, shimmering vision that hypnotizes with lights and textures that both welcome and disorient. In the center of the piece is a plush Hasten’s bed on which viewers lie surrounded on all sides by mirrors and cloud-like smoke. A disco ball rotates above. Is this a place for disco naps? Or is it a glamorous fantasy of decadence and visual riches? Spend some time, look at yourself in the many reflective surfaces, and feel the bedding against your skin and decide for yourself. Dreamy as it is, this space is grounded in the real world and governed by the laws of physics. This place seems like a fantasy, but it is entirely real. As one critic noted of an earlier Fischer work:In a world increasingly defined by virtual realities and digital imaging, is the creative mastery of hand manufacture merely a quaint artistic throwback — nostalgia for a lost cultural past? Is this sculpture a memorial? Given today’s ubiquitous special effects wizardry, shouldn’t art clasp technology to its bosom? There’s nothing virtual about the softness of the bed, nothing digital about the gleam of those lights or the mist surrounding you. Take off your shoes. Climb inside. This is real life.

ROBERT AND SHANA PARKEHARRISON

ロバート&シャナ パークハリスン
로버트와 샤나 파커해리슨은
Роберт и Шана ПаркеХэррисон
שאנה פארקר והאריסון רוברט
memorial

ÉTIENNE-LOUIS BOULLÉE

Cénotaphe à Newton

Boullée promoted the idea of making architecture expressive of its purpose, a doctrine that his detractors termed architecture parlante (“talking architecture”), which was an essential element in Beaux-Arts architectural training in the later 19th century. His style was most notably exemplified in his proposal for a cenotaph (a funerary monument celebrating a figure interred elsewhere) for the English scientist Isaac Newton, who 50 years after his death became a symbol of Enlightenment ideas. The building itself was a 150 m (500 ft) tall sphere, taller than the Great Pyramids of Giza, encompassed by two large barriers circled by hundreds of cypress trees. The massive and spheric shape of the building was inspired by Boullée’s own study called “theory of bodies” where he claims that the most beautiful and perfect natural body is the sphere, which is the most prominent element of the Newton Memorial. Though the structure was never built, Boullée had many ink and wash drawings engraved and circulated widely in the professional circles in 1784. The small sarcophagus for Newton is placed at the lower pole of the sphere. The design of the memorial is intended to create the effect of day and night. The night effect occurs when the sarcophagus is illuminated by the sunlight coming through the holes in the vaulting, giving the illusion of stars in the night sky. The day effect is an armillary sphere hanging in the center that gives off a mysterious glow. Thus, the use of light in the building’s design causes the building’s interior to change its appearance.