Oli Sorenson

Video Pistoletto
FILE-FESTIVAL
The latest of Oli Sorenson’s remix series is directly inspired by Michelangelo Pistoletto’s (1933) celebrated shattering of large mirrors.

Kimchi and Chips

Difference and Repetition
The title references Deleuzes thesis ‘Difference and Repetition’ – his attempt to understand reality without referring to identities. The artists aim to ‘unidentify’ the audience – to criticize the bubbles of reality which technology has helped us to build around ourselves. By allowing ourselves to remove our identity occasionally, we can better understand the thoughts of those we disagree with and therefore better work together to build a combined reality. Difference (in both senses) is generated by the motion control system which continuously changes the pose of the mirrors relative to the viewer. This movement disrupts space itself, creating a transformation similar to that of a Lorentz transformation when one travels close to the speed of light. This causes space itself to compress, twist and break, giving the viewer a tool for observing the non-absolute nature of time.

Oli Sorenson

LA SOCIETE DE LA PLACE DES SPECTACLES
FILE SAO PAULO 2015
Inspired from the live works of Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto (1933-) of meticulously ransacking large mirrors, Sorenson revisited the classical traditions of vanitas under the materiality of video, and generate his creative process from the destruction of consumer components.

Kenny Wong

Squint
file festival
I was inspired by how the sunlight bounces around in our artificial forest.
“Squint” is a kinetic light installation consisting of 49 mirrors that reflect lights in a bright space. The mirrors track and reflect lights on audiences’ face with composed patterns of movements. It extends the generated perception by focusing on how lights pass across our visual senses physically, and combines with our perception of images through flickering. “Squint”, which extracts various daily experiences to an abstraction brings the audience to expand their interpretation of lights and perceived imagination into a non-linear experience.
“Squint” simulates light source and intentionally shines lights on audience’s faces. Bright light is projected in the gallery, a clean bright space.
Everyday people are dynamically moving around in the city. Sunlight reflects and flickers even when it is indirect and hidden behind the artifacts. While we are traveling, we are experiencing motion. We are also experiencing the shift of light intensity, visual patterns and textures. The varieties of light forms inspire the artist to explore the potential of light textures, select and sort out the combined complexity in urban space. The artist turns them into a minimal form of light experience, while maximizing its diversity of perception.

Mattia Paco Rizzi + Jessica Bergstein-Collay

Taumascopio
‘Taumascopio’ is an art installation designed and realized by parisian architect-artist mattia paco rizzi for the 2014 kanal playground festival in brussels, belgium. the structure is completely covered with mirrors and as a result, offers a complete visual camouflage along the molenbeek’s canal. as its exterior panels fold, the overall massing creates a kaleidoscopic effect that reacts to heat. during the temperature’s evolution throughout the day, the surfaces present an ever-changing reflective effect. ‘the ‘taumascopio’ invites us to reflect in poetic vein on public space, like a box of delights that gives us multiple visions and allows us to see the city differently,’ says rizzi. ‘the mosaic of reflections sends our thoughts in new directions and invite us to create new ideas.’

RON GILAD

رون جلعاد
罗恩·吉拉德
רון גלעד
ロン·ギラッド
РОН ГИЛАД
Mirror

‘IX mirrors’ by israeli-born, new york-based artist ron gilad uses a series of ten embellished mirrors as a means of exploring self-reflection and perception, at milan’s dilmos gallery for salone del mobile 2011.

OLI SORENSON

video pistoletto
FILE SAO PAULO 2015

Inspired from the live works of Italian artist Michelangelo Pistoletto (1933-) of meticulously ransacking large mirrors, Sorenson revisited the classical traditions of vanitas under new materials together with one of the more celebrated exploits of Arte Povera.