KUNIHIKO MORINAGA

森永邦彦
쿠니히코 모리나가
くにひこ もりなが
КУНИХИКО МОРИНАГА
Anrealage

Kunihiko Morinaga, the creative director of cult Japanese label Anrealage, has a thing for sensations and optical illusions. His debut Paris show last season was about light and shadow. Today, his sophomore outing focused on light and dark. Or, better, on the impressions you get from flashing or projecting light in pitch black. The Anrealage sculptural silhouettes were cut in a special black fabric that revealed a printed texture only under ultraviolet lights, or had needle-punched white circles—like a spotlight projection—splattered across the front. To emphasize the depth of such darkness, everything was black, including models’ faces, a heavy stroke that made things a little too dramatic.

ADAM FERRISS

“Adam Ferriss is one of those technologically-minded creatives who is able to put his ever-growing knowledge of code and processing to use building aesthetically wondrous digital art for the rest of us to enjoy. His images make me feel like I’ve just taken some psychedelics and stepped into one of those crazy houses you get in funfairs, where there are giant optical illusions on every wall and the floor keeps moving under your feet, except these are made using algorithms and coding frameworks […]”

HOWARD SCHATZ

Говард Шатц
הווארד שץ
霍华德沙茨
هوارد كاتس
H2O

Howard Schatz takes full advantage of the all the properties of water and pull off the most amazing shots. He loves capturing the optical illusions created by the refraction of light off the water’s surface. Being underwater also lends his models a certain grace that is heightened by the gauze-like material they wear. Howard Schatz is a prolific photographer who has received international acclaim for his work. He rose to stardom in the 1990s with his two collections of underwater photography […]

DOMINIQUE PETRIN

Pazzazz
Dominique Pétrin brings the image to its highest degree of saturation and develops an intense dialogue between images, their support, and their configuration. Pazzazz is a Greco-Roman fresco that recalls the music-hall of the 70s. Excess, wealth, and decadence are represented in an ornamental style that is almost threatening. Between dreams and apparitions, the optical illusion is lost in a maze of pleasure and abuse, enjoyment and intoxication.

Aisha Zeijpveld

What Remains
By crafting bodily optical illusions, the Aisha Zeijpveld ‘What Remains’ series obscures reality. These captures were taken by Amsterdam-based photographer Aisha Zeijpveld. According to her website, Zeijpveld’s “focus on people their nakedness and vulnerability yet simultaneously their potency and pride characterizes her photography.” In order to create that capacity in her work, the ‘What Remains’ series was based around the sketches of Austrian artist Egon Schiele. By translating these sketches into photographs, Zeijpveld recreates the expressive figures portrayed by Schiele often were “unfinished.”

LOLA DUPRE

Лола Дюпре
ロラ·デュプレ
萝拉杜普雷
ولا دوبري

Lola, who defines herself as a collage artist and illustrator, caused a big buzz with her recent works that could be defined as kaleidoscope explosion portraits. One cannot but simply admire her remarkable technique and the meticulous working process that lies behind the dazzling optical illusions that she creates. Moreover, what we love about her works is that despite the ”explosive” treatment that Lola Dupré puts the original portraits through, the final result is equally, or even more, dynamic and complex.

JULIAN HOEBER

Джулиан Хобер
DEMON HILL, A DISORIENTING OPTICAL ILLUSION

FELICE VARINI

Felice Varini est un grand maître dans l’art complexe de l’illusion d’optique. Depuis 1979, ce peintre suisse utilise l’architecture comme toile de fond. À partir de relevés, il définit un point de vue à partir duquel la forme, toujours géométrique, pourra être vue dans son ensemble par le spectateur. Lorsque l’on se déplace, une infinité d’autres points de vue se créent pour offrir de multiples lectures de la forme déconstruite.

SUZAN DRUMMEN

kaleidoscopic crystal floor
dutch artist suzan drummen’s large-scale floor installations are mesmerizing and complex circular patterns made out of mirrors and brightly colored glass. the fractal-like arrangements feature ornate and elaborate circles growing exponentially out of each other and vibrant rings of spiraling colors winding into the surface of the floor. they are composed of crystals, chromed metal, precious stones, mirrors and optical glass. a sensory experience, and visually stimulating, the glittering installations play with the architecture of the space — climbing up walls and sweeping across the surfaces — examining the idea of illusion and optical effects.