COMPAGNIE MARIE CHOUINARD

Мари Шуинар
BODY REMIX GOLDBERG VARIATIONS
Durante los primeros pasos de esta creación, los bailarines y yo trabajamos sobre las Goldberg Variations de Bach, tal y como las interpretó Glenn Gould en 1981, así como la voz del pianista, con sus cadencias orales durante una entrevista de radio dedicada a esta particular interpretación.
Emprendí el trabajo con una mezcla de los cuerpos de los bailarines, a través del uso de varios elementos de apoyo: muletas, picos, arneses, etc. Una barra de ballet fue trasformada en un material musical. Pedí también al compositor Louis Dufort que usara un “apoyo”, concretamente una interpretación de Gould y su voz, y a proponer variaciones sobre las Variations. Diez de las treinta variaciones, así como las dos Arias, fueron remezcladas o incluso recompuestas (1, 2, 4, 11, 15, 16, 21, 23, 25 and 29). Otras tres variaciones (5, 6 y 8) se ofrecerán en su versión original.

Irena Haiduk

Spinal Discipline
Irena Haiduk is the founder of Yugoexport, an oral corporation whose primary goal is to demonstrate how to surround ourselves with things in the right way. Her works have been heard or seen at the Kadist Art Foundation in Paris, The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, and the 14th Istanbul Biennial.

ANDY LOMAS

Morphogenetic Creations
Created by a mathematician, digital artist and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer generated effects – Andy Lomas, Morphogenetic Creations is a collection of works that explore the nature of complex forms that can be produced by digital simulation of growth systems. These pieces start with a simple initial form which is incrementally developed over time by adding iterative layers of complexity to the structure.The aim is to create structures emergently: exploring generic similarities between many different forms in nature rather than recreating any particular organism. In the process he is exploring universal archetypal forms that can come from growth processes rather than top-down externally engineered design.Programmed using C++ with CUDA, the series use a system of growth by deposition: small particles of matter are repeatedly deposited onto a growing structure to build incrementally over time. Rules are used to determine how new particles are created, and how they move before being deposited. Small changes to these rules can have dramatic effects on the final structure, in effect changing the environment in which the form is grown. To create these works, Andy uses the GPU as a compute device rather than as a display device. All the data is held in memory on the GPU and various kernel functions are called to do things like apply forces to the cells, make cells split, and to render the cells using ray-tracing. The simulations and rendering for each of the different animated structures within this piece take about 12 hours to run, Andy explains. By the end of the simulations there are over 50,000,000 cells in each structure.The Cellular Forms use a more biological model, representing a simplified system of cellular growth. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for the forces between cells, as well as rules for how cells accumulate internal nutrients. When the nutrient level in a cell exceeds a given threshold the cell splits into two, with both the parent and daughter cells reconnecting to their immediate neighbours. Many different complex organic structures are seen to arise from subtle variations on these rules, creating forms with strong reminiscences of plants, corals, internal organs and micro-organisms.

HeeWon Lee

INFINITY III
Infinity III est une invitation à un voyage mental perturbant créé à partir d’images de synthèses. Dans la continuité de son travail autour des cycles naturels (avec la série d’installations « Infinity »), HeeWon Lee nous projette au coeur de nuées d’oiseaux lumineuses et évanescentes… En évoluant dans ce ballet animal, la notion de temporalité et d’espace s’effacent.

PAUL CHAN

Odysseus und die Badegäste
Weit entfernt von den traditionellen pastoralen Szenen, die durch den Titel der Ausstellung hervorgerufen werden, hat der in New York lebende Künstler im Museum für kykladische Kunst in Athen eine helle und minimalistische Serie kinetischer Skulpturen beschworen. Für die neuen Werke ließ sich der Künstler von Ancient inspirieren Griechenland. Dies geschah nicht nur durch die Titel seiner Arbeit, die sich mit den Namen von Charakteren aus The Odyssey befassen, sondern auch durch die Erforschung der Eigenschaften der Protagonisten. Abstrakt und rätselhaft bringt Paul Chan die philosophische Verbindung des antiken griechischen Denkens kunstvoll mit eine moderne und zuordenbare neue Umgebung. Odysseus ‘Drang, nach dem Trojanischen Krieg in seine Heimat zurückzukehren, und die Art und Weise, wie er die Reise steuert, werden zu einer ergreifenden Metapher für zeitgenössische Erfahrungen.

Kengo Kuma

Botanical Pavilion
To realize the ‘Botanical Pavilion’, Kengo Kuma worked alongside Geoff Nees — a melbourne-based artist and curator who has also worked on a number of architectural pavilions. Made in the japanese tradition of wooden architecture, where pieces interlock, held by tension and gravity, the structure at the NGV triennial features a tessellated interior lined with timber collected from trees felled or removed over several years at Melbourne’s royal botanic gardens. Some of the trees used within the architecture pre-date european settlement, while others signal the development of the gardens as a site of scientific research and botanical classification. Prioritizing natural phenomena over scientific order, the botanical species used are color-coded, rather than following any taxonomic order. this approach offers a statement by the designers against the reductive nature of science during the colonial era — a mindset at odds with many indigenous cultural beliefs and knowledge systems.

Klaus Obermaier

克劳斯奥伯迈尔
the concept of … (here and now)

In front of a giant screen, two dancers interact with a cohort of cameras… Their movements are captured by infra-red sensors and projected onto the screen, whereby their bodies become the canvas on which new images take shape. The result is a shifting kaleidoscope of strange, living, quasi-mathematical visual worlds which sometimes seem to be emanating or even escaping from the dancers’ bodies. “Who decides which movement to make: the man or the machine?” Blurring the line between the real and the virtual, Klaus Obermaier loves to subsume his performers’ bodies and physicality in a disconcerting digital universe. With his latest creation, the choreographer/artist has taken a bold new step. He has constructed a system of projectors and infra-red sensor-cameras, trained upon the movements of two dancers. The performers thus find themselves thrown headlong into a living, moving graphical universe: their movements are projected onto the screen, but at the same time their bodies are illuminated by more projected images. This is a true artistic performance, pushing well beyond the frontiers of a standard dance recital, or even a contemporary dance show. A corporeal, temporal performance. A choreography which makes subtle use of its raw materials, deftly combining lights, video, perspectives and the real-time power of bodily movement.

universal everything

super consumers floral

Superconsumers is a response to the luxury consumer products on sale within the department store. Universal Everything created a series of extreme digital-pop-art amplifications of these products, bringing them to life as a diverse, animated parade of characters – from metallic puffer jackets to elaborate jewellery, gastronomical creations to bold floral arrangements.

JORG NIEHAGE

Samplingplong
File Festival

Randomly selected, acoustically usable finds (electronic junk, relays, plastic toys,compressed air valves, pneumatically operated components) are combined with cables and tubes. Via a device controlled by computer, they are turned into interactive instruments. An improvised ensemble evolves, from which – per mouse-over and mouse-click -short miniature compositions of dense rhythmic clicks, hisses, whirs, hums and crackles can be elicited. A tapestry of sound bursts forth from the floral-like web of cables and tubes. The installation can be used by the projected mouse-cursor: rolling over the improvised instruments causes small sound events. Activating the installation by rolling over its parts enables the user to play spontaneous improvisations. Clicking these objects starts short programs of loop-like compositions. Small “techno-compositions en miniature”, rhythmic patterns of analog (or real) sounds; a physical low-tech simulation of electronic, digital music, perhaps an ironic comment on interactivity.

Chris Salter

n-Polytope: Behaviors in Light and Sound after Iannis Xenakis
N_Polytope: Behaviors in Light and Sound After Iannis Xenakis is a spectacular light and sound performance-installation combining cutting edge lighting, lasers, sound, sensing and machine learning software inspired by composer Iannis Xenakiss radical 1960s- 1970s works named Polytopes (from the Greek ‘poly’, many and ‘topos’, space). As large scale, immersive architectural environments that made the indeterminate and chaotic patterns and behaviour of natural phenomena experiential through the temporal dynamics of light and the spatial dynamics of sound, the Polytopes still to this day are relatively unknown but were far ahead of their time. N_Polytope is based on the attempt to both re-imagine Xenakis’ work with probabilistic/stochastic systems with new techniques as well as to explore how these techniques can exemplify our own historical moment of extreme instability.

MOUTH CTRLER

The project developed in collaboration with experts from different scientific and creative fields: Dr.Trevor Coward,Dr.Shama Rahman,Nuala Clooney,Matteo Rossetti
A collaboration with designer: Luca Alessandrini and Dr. Michelle Korda
Mouth CTRLer is a transdisciplinary project combining scientific findings about the sensing and sensory capabilities of the oral cavity with prosthetics and interactive technologies. It investigates tangible technological possibilities for human enhancement inside the mouth in the form of wearable prototypes.

Di Mainstone & Joanna Berzowska

Skorpions
LUTTERGILL
Skorpions are a set of kinetic electronic garments that move and change on the body in slow, organic motions.They breathe and pulse, controlled by their own internal programming. They are not “interactive” artifacts insofar as their programming does not respond to simplistic sensor data. They have intentionality; they are programmed to live, to exist, to subsist. They are living behavioral kinetic sculptures that exploit characteristics such as control, anticipation and unpredictability. They have their own personalities, their own fears and desires.

Sitraka Rakotoniaina

Time Conditioning
No seu projeto, tempo é reduzido a um parâmetro que pode ser modulável enquanto dissocia o cérebro do resto da experiência corporal. Em “Time Conditioning”, Raktoniaina cria uma prótese para treinar o braço a operar à velocidade de uma mosca. Enquanto isso supõe uma aceleração dos reflexos, o resultado é o oposto, e os neurônios musculares têm uma experiência em slow motion, fazendo com que corpo e mente experienciem o tempo em dois intervalos diferentes.

Ting-Tong Chang

Robinson
FILE FESTIVAL SAO PAULO 2016
The piece “Robinson” is part of Ting-Tong Chang’s new body of work investigating the history of automatons in Europe as a means of exploring utopian visions. The word “automaton” is often used to describe self-moving machines, especially those that have been made to resemble human or animal actions. From Jacques de Vaucanson’s Digesting Duck (1739) to Andreas Jakob Graf Dietrichstein’s Mechanical Theatre (1752), automatons have entertained kings and princesses, taught moral lesson to citizens and raised deep philosophical questions

Diana Thater

“Science,Fiction”

Through a combination of the temporal qualities of video and the architectural dimension of its physical installation, Thater’s work explores the artifice of its own production and its capacity to construct perception and shape the way we think about the world through its image. Natural diversity, wildlife, and conservation have been persistent themes in the artist’s work, and she has dedicated herself to an examination of the varied kinds of relationships humans have constructed with animals. While her in-depth studies of ecosystems and animal behavior propose observation as a kind of understanding in itself, her ethical position is implicit in the work, which, while subtly political, provides views of the sublime in all its incarnations—stunning, beautiful, and simultaneously terrifying.

Cod.Act

振り子の合唱団
Pendulum Choir

Pendulum Choir is an original choral piece for 9 A Cappella voices and 18 hydraulic jacks. The choir stands on tilting platforms, constituting a living, sonorous body. That body expresses itself through various physical states. Its plasticity varies at the mercy of its sonority. It varies between abstract sounds, repetitive sounds, and lyrical or narrative sounds. The bodies of the singers and their voices play with and against gravity. They brush and avoid each other creating subtle vocal polyphonies. Or, supported by electronic sounds, they break their cohesion and burst into lyrical flight or fold up into an obsessional and dark ritual. The organ travels from life to death in a robotic allegory where the technological complexity and the lyricism of the moving bodies combine into a work with Promethean accents.

Lera Auerbach

Post Silentium
Stony Brook Symphony Orchestra
Jens Goerg Bachmann

24 Preludes for Piano, Op. 41
Performed by Hyeri Choi

Ludwig’s Nightmare
Performed by Yael Weiss

Born in the Russian city of Chelyabinsk on the border of Siberia, Russian-American composer,
concert pianist, poet and visual artist Lera Auerbach has become one of today’s most sought
after and exciting creative voices. She has published more than 100 works for orchestra, opera
and ballet, as well as choral and chamber music.

Danny Hillis

parallel supercomputer
Connection Machine CM-1(1986) and CM-2 (1987)

The Connection Machine was the first commercial computer designed expressly to work on “artificial intelligence” problems simulating intelligence and life. A massively parallel supercomputer with 65,536 processors, it was the brainchild of Danny Hillis, conceived while he was a doctoral student studying with Marvin Minsky at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab. In 1983 Danny founded Thinking Machines Corporation to build the machine, and hired me to lead the packaging design group. Working with industrial design consultants Allen Hawthorne and Gordon Bruce, and mechanical engineer consultant Ted Bilodeau, our goal was to make the machine look like no other machine ever built. I have described that journey in this article, published in 1994 in the DesignIssues journal and republished in 2010 in the book The Designed World.

video

KICHUL KIM

김기철
sound looking
Kim Kichul ha lavorato continuamente con il suono, contro forme d’arte visive più tradizionali. Per Kim, il suono stesso è il soggetto piuttosto che un elemento aggiunto che compone una parte dell’intera scultura, ed è un continuum già inerente a un significato.
Kim ha iniziato a usare il suono nel suo lavoro attraverso un’esperienza che ha avuto durante l’ascolto della radio. Ha sperimentato qualità del suono spazio-temporale e si è sentito come se stesse guardando il suono fisico reale proveniente da una radio. Il suo lavoro 11-Faced Avalokitesvara presentato nella sua prima mostra personale nel 1993 partiva dalla parola Avalokitesvara, che spiega il sentire il soggetto come se volesse vederlo. Kim fu profondamente commosso da un verso di Bomunpum, il venticinquesimo capitolo del Sutra del Loto, che affermava che se Sattva, nella loro sofferenza, avesse cantato l’Avalokitesvara con una semplice concentrazione, avrebbero potuto raggiungere il Nirvana. Posizionando 10 statue di Avalokitesvara su radio, ciascuna sintonizzata su canali diversi, ha presentato un metodo compositivo per osservare il suono attraverso la sinestesia.
È chiaro che il suono stesso è il principale argomento di interesse di Kim, specialmente attraverso il suo precedente lavoro Sound Looking (1999), che materializza visivamente le proprietà del suono dipendenti dai sensi uditivi. In questo lavoro, le particelle in un tubo trasparente si muovono secondo le onde del suono generato e tutte le cose visibili vengono mobilitate per rivelare il suono invisibile.

RICARDO BARRETO, MARIA HSU and AMUDI

feel Me tactile interactive bed
File Festival
“feelMe” is a work that for the first time remotely transmits the tactile sensation. Our work provokes the exploration of the sense of touch while promoting the interaction between two people mediated by a machine. The work is constituted of two surfaces, or “beds”: the first one (tactile transmission unit), in which one of the participants, layed down, imprints marks to its surface by pressing it with the weight and movement of the different parts of his/her body; these impressions will be captured and transmitted to the other participant, who lies in the second “bed” (tactile reception unit) and receives them simultaneously in the same positions and in proportional intensities, however, in negative, that is, when the surface in the first bed sinks, it rises in the second one, promoting a touch. The first body touches the second one, and the “beds” may be a few meters or thousands of kilometers apart from each other. Between the bodies, dozens of occult sensors, microcontrollers, engines (lineal actors), computers and a program that orchestrates that tactile communication. We allow the participant to experiment the possibilities of encounter between bodies through the digital world, with a different approach from the one provided by virtual reality. We want to explore the tactile perception separately in its “corporal way”, and only in future works to propose the expansion/extension of multimedia perception with the inclusion of tactile perception.