Vitor Freire

Projeto IJO
FILE SAO PAULO 2015 FILE LED SHOW
“IJO” means dance in Yoruba. The project was born inside a series of actions with the objective of reframing the place of dance and a re-appropriation of the public spaces. Adapted to FILE FESTIVAL, the project unfolds its initial ambition, painting the walls and buildings of the city with dancing. By positioning themselves in front of “IJO”, the participants will have a visual representation of their bodies exhibited in real time on the FIESP building. Dance to tell who you are.

Katharina Grosse

It Wasn’t Us

A painting by Katharina Grosse can appear anywhere. Her large-scale works are multi-dimensional pictorial worlds in which splendid color sweeps across walls, ceilings, objects, and even entire buildings and landscapes. For the exhibition “It Wasn’t Us” the artist has transformed the Historic Hall of Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin as well as the outdoor space behind the building, into an expansive painting which radically destabilises the existing order of the museum architecture.

CLAUDIA COMTE

HOW TO GROW AND STILL STAY THE SAME SHAPE
If Comte’s sculptures are rooted in the naturalness of biomorphic forms, her mural interventions transform surfaces into optical sequences and infinite graphic signs with a digital age aesthetic. The monochromatic vocabulary that invests all her work brings her visually close to the abstraction of Sol LeWitt, Bridget Riley and even John Armleder, an artist with whom she studied. On the occasion of her exhibition at Castello di Rivoli, Comte has carried out a gigantic mural intervention consisting of eleven individual wall paintings specially designed for the galleries on the third floor of the historic residence. Also inspired by some eighteenth-century decorative motifs present on the ceilings and walls of the main museum building, the work develops repeated modules through space.

Ernst Caramelle

Video–Landscape
Ernst Caramelle’s artistic approach stands in the tradition of concept art, which considers the idea as equal to the artistic product, whether realized or not. Since the mid-seventies, Caramelle has created an extremely diverse body of work shifting from video works to drawings, photographs, paintings and wall installations. Using various manifestations of color and geometric form, often applied directly to the walls of an installation space, Caramelle’s work explores the relationship between the art concept and the space it occupies.

Julia Dault

Julia Dault is known for richly textured paintings on pleather, silk, and spandex, and for sculptural works fixed to gallery walls with string and knots. Plexiglas, formica, and Everlast boxing wraps—Dault’s materials of choice—lend her sleek abstract sculptures a raw, industrial aesthetic, while they retain a certain naturalness through their rounded organic forms. In her paintings, Dault likewise focuses on depth and materiality by building up colorful layers of paint and vinyl and then scraping parts away.