Cornelius Cardew

TREATISE
KYMATIC ensemble
Treatise is a graphic musical score comprising 193 pages of lines, symbols, and various geometric or abstract shapes that largely eschew conventional musical notation. Implicit in the title is a reference to the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein, which was of particular inspiration to Cardew in composing the work.

Bernar Venet

88.5° Arc x 8
Bernar Venet is a French Conceptual artist known for his curved, mathematically precise metal sculptures, and for his material exploration of coal, asphalt, and tar. “My work is self-generated. Nothing around me serves as a particular inspiration,” Venet said of his art. “I work, and I make discoveries while remaining open-minded to anything that might present a new possibility in the context of my work; this framework looks to enlarge its scope as a result of new formal and conceptual discoveries.” Born on April 20, 1941 in Château-Arnoux-Saint-Auban, the painter and sculptor studied at La Villa Thiole in Nice in 1958 for a year before pursuing a career as an artist. Friends with Arman, Jean Tinguely, Donald Judd, and Sol LeWitt, Venet worked within Minimalist and Conceptualist modes during the 1960s and 1970s.
video

Kazuhiro Yamanaka

collapsible moon
The big circular Lamp of Kazuhiro Yamanaka draws inspiration from his particular relationship with the moon.

Jim Shaw

吉姆·肖
짐 쇼
ジム・ショー
Superman Body Parts

The practice of American artist Jim Shaw spans a wide range of both artistic media and visual imagery. Since the 1970s, Shaw has mined the detritus of American culture, finding inspiration for his artworks in comic books, pulp novels, rock albums, protest posters, thrift store paintings and advertisements. At the same time, Shaw has consistently turned to his own life and, in particular, his unconscious, as a source of artistic creativity.

Los Carpinteros

ロス·テロス
ЛОС-КАРПИНТЕРОС
150 People

Interested in the intersection between art and society, the group merges architecture, design, and sculpture in unexpected and often humorous ways. They create installations and drawings which negotiate the space between the functional and the nonfunctional. The group’s elegant and mordantly humorous sculptures, drawings, and installations draw their inspiration from the physical world—particularly that of furniture. Their carefully crafted works use humor to exploit a visual syntax that sets up contradictions among object and function 
as well as practicality and uselessness.

Eliane Radigue

Islas resonantes

c’est un des apanages de la musique minimaliste basée sur des sons longuement tenus, lorsqu’elle est conçue de manière adéquate et irriguée par une réelle inspiration, que d’être susceptible de plonger l’auditeur dans un état second, une sorte de rêve éveillé qui décuple paradoxalement l’acuité de son écoute et lui permet de percevoir les détails les plus infimes et les nuances les plus subtiles de ce qui lui est donné à entendre. c’est à une aventure de ce type que nous convie éliane radigue avec « l’île re-sonante », jusqu’à des confins poétiques qui n’appartiennent qu’à son univers musical.

si cette pièce a été composée pour être écoutée d’une traite et qu’aucun effet de rupture n’y est brutalement marqué, elle offre cependant la particularité d’être constituée d’une succession de séquences qui crée une sorte d’architecture impalpable aux proportions harmonieusement établies. c’est bien d’une oeuvre musicale au sens que l’on donne habituellement à ce terme en occident qu’il s’agit, et non d’un simple environnement sonore à caractère plus ou moins expérimental.

SHIRO KURAMATA

倉俣 史朗
glass chair

Shiro Kuramata’s approach to designing objects reflects the atmosphere of innovation in postwar Japan. By 1970, Kuramata had introduced alternative materials such as acrylic and glass into his furniture, which played on traditional ideas of materiality and form.Transparency, the appearance of weightlessness, and a Minimalist vocabulary quickly became his signature aesthetic. In 1976, Kuramata designed Glass Chair. Its reductivist and planar form reflects his interest in geometry as well as the effect of light as it transforms and illuminates the glass. Kuramata, like many of his Japanese contemporaries, looked to Western culture for inspiration. In particular, the sculptures of Donald Judd and Dan Flavin influenced Kuramata’s furniture designs of the 1970s, such as Glass Chair.