Liu Wa

2020 Got Me Like
As COVID-19 speeds around the world and continues to shut down more cities, people begin to consume Internet culture in order to escape the apocalyptic anxiety in 2020, allowing Internet memes to go viral across the globe. Built upon social media, this work merges everyday sentiments with classical movie scenes to deconstruct the common imagination of “apocalypse” in entertainment industry. The video also incorporates the artist’s footage during protests, turning memes into public commentary and political satire. In this eventful year, meme does more than hijacking and decontextualizing meanings, it has become a form of silent revolt against the absurd.

guli silberstein

Field of Infinity

Inspired by both Italian Renaissance paintings and contemporary news broadcasts of protests at the border of Gaza with Israel – the work processes human gestures and figures in a landscape into a dark and colorful mix, opening up a series of reflections on the political image, the image of the political, the politics of the image, and the image of the image.

file sao paulo 2019 videoart

Marc Quinn

A Surge of Power
Within 24 hours Marc Quinn’s statue A Surge of Power (Jen Reid) 2020 has been erected in secret on a Bristol plinth and as quickly removed by the council. Life-sized, cast in black resin, it showed the campaigner Jen Reid standing, one fist raised, in a pose in which a photographer had captured her a few weeks earlier when she had stood on the empty plinth after Black Lives Matter (BLM) protesters tore down a bronze monument to the 17th-century slaver Edward Colston.

Marketa Martiskova

Ensemble “Protest”
Graduate from the Royal Academy in Antwerp Markéta Martišková left to study in Belgium after finishing her studies at The Academy of Fine Arts and Design (VŠVU) in Bratislava. Antwerp has become her second home and her strongest source of inspiration for new ideas and work. Being a designer, Markéta communicates through symbols, typography and prints. She also always tries to use new techniques. The theme of each of her collections contains a certain element of wit and draws on the designer’s imagination. She creates collections for women as well as children.

Jim Shaw

吉姆·肖
짐 쇼
ジム・ショー
Superman Body Parts

The practice of American artist Jim Shaw spans a wide range of both artistic media and visual imagery. Since the 1970s, Shaw has mined the detritus of American culture, finding inspiration for his artworks in comic books, pulp novels, rock albums, protest posters, thrift store paintings and advertisements. At the same time, Shaw has consistently turned to his own life and, in particular, his unconscious, as a source of artistic creativity.

GILLIAN WEARING

Lilly cole
La identidad, la autorrepresentación, las relaciones humanas y la vida cotidiana son los temas que Gillian Wearing, mujer provocadora, paradógica, y compleja, trata en sus series fotográficas y de vídeo, que podemos conocer en varias exposiciones desde que en 1997 consiguió el Premio Turner, que consagra a los jóvenes artistas británicos, con frecuencia en medio del escándalo y la protesta, no en vano, resultan frecuentes sus conocidas “aptitudes gamberras”.

monty python

life of brian
The film’s themes of religious satire were controversial at the time of its release, drawing accusations of blasphemy and protests from some religious groups. Thirty-nine local authorities in the United Kingdom either imposed an outright ban, or imposed an X (18 years) certificate.[6] Some countries, including Ireland and Norway, banned its showing, and a few of these bans lasted decades. The filmmakers used the notoriety to promote the film, with posters in Sweden reading, “So funny, it was banned in Norway!”

EGLE RAKAUSKAITE

The screw

Egle Rakauskaite is a leading Lithuanian artist, prominent on the world scene for her highly individual and memorable works. Born in 1967, she studied painting at Vilnius Academy of Arts and graduated in 1993. Described by critic Lolita Jablonskiene as “a unique artist, who does not follow any current trends of Lithuanian art”, Rakauskaite works in various media (video, performance, photography, making objects), free to associate and assemble them in different configurations as the project demands.In the early years of her career, she made objects out of unconventional and perishable materials such as chocolate, jasmine flowers, human hair, honey and fat. As she states, “these materials were used to protest against paint and canvas. Many critics attributed this interest in unconventional materials and also some of the images I constructed to my interest in feminist art. However, I think that at present the differences between male and female creation are not that visible any more. It is important that the art work opens itself to the consciousness and sub-consciousness of the viewer”.

Kevin Beasley

Strange Fruit
Using both sculpture and musical performance in his practice, Kevin Beasley explores the physical materiality and cultural connotations of both objects and sound. His sculptures typically incorporate everyday items like clothing, housewares, or sporting goods, bound together using tar, foam, resin, or other materials. Often they also contain embedded audio equipment that warps and amplifies the ambient tones of their surroundings. For Storylines, Beasley has created two new works specifically for the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. Within this vast and open sonic environment, Strange Fruit (Pair 1) and Strange Fruit (Pair 2) (both 2015) offer an experience of intimacy, absorbing and reflecting the sound of the crowd at the scale of a personal conversation. Each work embodies this spirit of dialogue in its two-part structure—at its core are two athletic shoes, one merged with microphones, the other with speakers. Suspending these objects in space, Beasley compounds their technological interchange with additional layers of meaning, bringing to mind the urban phenomenon of shoes hanging from overhead wires or poles (itself an open-ended form of communication). At the same time the works’ titles refer to history of lynchings in the American South memorialized by Bronx schoolteacher Abel Meerepol in the 1937 protest song “Strange Fruit.” In these contexts, the hanging forms of Beasley’s sculptures resonate not only with his body, which molded them by hand, or with the bodies moving through the museum, but also with those inscribed in the problematic history of race and class in the United States.

zach blas

Facial Weaponization Suite
Die Facial Weaponization Suite protestiert gegen die biometrische Gesichtserkennung – und die Ungleichheiten, die diese Technologien verbreiten -, indem sie in Community-basierten Workshops „kollektive Masken“ erstellt, die aus den aggregierten Gesichtsdaten der Teilnehmer modelliert werden. Dies führt zu amorphen Masken, die von Menschen nicht als menschliche Gesichter erkannt werden können biometrische Gesichtserkennungstechnologien. Die Masken werden für öffentliche Interventionen und Aufführungen verwendet. Eine Maske, die Fag-Gesichtsmaske, die aus den biometrischen Gesichtsdaten vieler queerer Männergesichter generiert wird, ist eine Antwort auf wissenschaftliche Studien, die die Bestimmung der sexuellen Orientierung durch schnelle Gesichtserkennungstechniken verbinden. Eine andere Maske untersucht eine dreigliedrige Vorstellung von Schwärze, die zwischen biometrischem Rassismus (der Unfähigkeit biometrischer Technologien, dunkle Haut zu erkennen), der Bevorzugung von Schwarz in der militanten Ästhetik und Schwarz als dem, was informell verschleiert, aufgeteilt ist. Eine dritte Maske befasst sich mit den Beziehungen des Feminismus zu Verschleierung und Unmerklichkeit und betrachtet die jüngste Schleiergesetzgebung in Frankreich als einen beunruhigenden Ort, der Sichtbarkeit zu einer unterdrückenden Kontrolllogik macht. Eine vierte Maske greift den Einsatz von Biometrie als Grenzsicherungstechnologie an der mexikanisch-amerikanischen Grenze und die daraus resultierende Gewalt und den damit verbundenen Nationalismus auf. Diese Masken überschneiden sich mit der Verwendung von Maskierung durch soziale Bewegungen als undurchsichtiges Werkzeug der kollektiven Transformation, das dominante Formen politischer Repräsentation ablehnt.

voina

kiss garbage

“We create a new and honest, heroic and monumental form of art.”
Voina means war in Russian. Voina is a collective of about twenty artists/activists who challenge the Russian establishment with their radical actions in the public space. According to Voina’s principles, the battleground of the art collective are not contemporary art galleries (“conformist art-junk”). The war takes place in the street, among dirt and ice, in police stations, in restaurants, museums, and courts.Owing to their direct method of intervention against the symbols of power and repression, they are regarded as one of the most disturbing and controversial elements of the arts scene. One of Voina members is currently waiting for trial, another member was arrested illegally during the recent demonstrations to protest against fraud in the Russian election (but he managed to escape from the police station), and yet another one had to flee from the country.

Klaus Leidorf

Scrap Tires

Photographer – Pilot – Aerial Archaeologist
Already in his childhood Klaus Leidorf enjoyed taking photographs from all kind of perspectives – that this is going to be his profession one day he would not think of yet. He studied protestant theology, but realized soon that this is not what he wants to do his whole life. So he changed the subject to pre- and early history.
After his studies he worked at the Bavarian State Office for the Preservation of Historical Monuments and after two years there was the possibility to continue the aerial archaeology for Bavaria. Therefor he got his pilot license and from the late 80ies on, his workplace is several hundred meters above ground in a Cessna 172.

Heidi Kumao

Protest

“Protest” is from the project, “Misbehaving: Media Machines Act Out”(2002-2007), a series of mechanical girls’ legs, each with their own prescribed and programmed behavior. In each tableau, an electronically controlled, mechanical being protests with a voice of erratic physical gestures and projected video imagery. As a combination of robotics and performance, they represent girls who disobey or resist expectations. Unlike machines designed for perfect job performance, these machines will declare their fallibility, impatience, approval, and disapproval through small gestural acts. In these tableaus of protest and transformation, the machine is spirited, emotional, thoughtful, and irregular. “Protest” consists of aluminum, mechanized pairs of 6 year-old girl’s legs fitted with shoes and standing on a table top. An electronic circuit and proximity sensors make her responsive to the presence of viewers for whom she stomps loudly and erratically