KOHEI NAWA

Biomatrix
«Biomatrix» est une installation d’extrémités scycles de bulles de cellules éruptives émergeant à la surface de l’huile de silicone liquide. Cette circulation du liquide coloré évoque le comportement du magma ou du sang et, en raison de la viscosité élevée de l’huile de silicium, illustre le mouvement du matériau à une vitesse faussement plus lente que l’attente du spectateur. La piscine à commande électrique devient une interface qui amplifie l’impact visuel et produit à l’infini des motifs cellulaires. Une formation de grille ordonnée apparaît comme une matrice numérique, tandis qu’une observation plus approfondie révèle des irrégularités telles qu’une effervescence sporadique et simultanée et des sons plosifs brisant la tension superficielle.

Kohei Nawa

Biomatrix
“Biomatrix” is an installation of endles scycles of eruptive cell bubbles emerging on the surface of liquid silicone oil. This circulation of the colored liquid evokes the behaviour of magma or blood, and due to the high viscosity of silicon oil, illustrates the movement of the material at a speed deceptively slower than the viewer’s expectation. The electrically controlled pool becomes an interface that amplifies visual impact, and infinitely produces cell patterns. An orderly grid formation appears as a digital matrix, while closer observation reveals irregularities such as sporadic and simultaneous effervescence and plosive sounds breaking the surface tension.

Takuya Matsunobu and Yasuaki Kakehi

Coworo
Coworo is an installation with a shape changing liquid that loses its texture under a spotlight and looks almost solid. After a while, bubbles appear on the surface and disappear again, as if it were breathing. The waves gradually change their size, position, and frequency and develop into physical, continual, kinetic, three-dimensional animations that extend beyond the discrete 2D pixel pattern. Through the hybrid combination of the digitally programmed machine and the organic properties of the physical material, the object creates a constant flux of ephemeral shapes and patterns.

SEBASTIAN WOLF

Brume
In the collaborative work Brume fog emerges from and self-organizes on the surface on a sculptural element, congealing with light into an elusive stratum. The installation utilizes a series of ultrasonic transducers that generate thick clouds of dense, yet extremely lightweight water vapor. Fog is produced in an inner chamber contained within an enclosure that is outfitted with a porous surface. A small radial blower inside the apparatus gently pumps air into the inner chamber lifting the fog through the membrane, whereby it “settles” on the surface. Viewed from a distance, the fog appears as a visualized mass of air circumscribing the perimeter of the enclosure.