Stillness

THINK AND SENSE

Under the theme of Zen, this artwork represents a part of the philosophy of Zen with three-dimensional data created with photogrammetry technology composed of the most minimalistic landscape of “dots” and the soundscape of “undulations,” with the cooperation of Toryo Ito, vice priest of Ryosokuin, Kennin-ji Tacchu temple, Kyoto. The generated image reflecting the environmental information of the exhibition space creates “interaction between the environment and the image,” just like the trees and leaves swinging in the silence in the garden of a Zen temple.

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Credit Concept / Technical Direction: Shuhei Matsuyama Point Cloud System Design:Takamitsu Masumi Sound Design: Intercity-Express (Tetsuji Ohno) Photogrammetry Shooting: Naoya Takebe Photogrammetry Engineering: Katsuya Sakuma

Balint Bolygo

Trace II

Trace II is a sculptural device that alludes to scientific discoveries and the experimental apparatus of science. It is essentially a mechanical computer that draws its analogue programme from a revolving plaster head. The carefully balanced mechanism slowly measures the topography of a cast human head and translates its undulations onto a rotating cylindrical surface. The result is an evolving topographical diagrammatic depiction that is truly unique every time.

JOHN POWERS

undulations
The combination of kinetic visual beauty and auditory irritation animates the gallery space. Undulations’ form and sound compliment the motorized bow of the nearby Violinist, thereby creating an unusual object-based performance within the gallery space.

CORY ARCANGEL

Untitled Kinetic Sculpture #2
The old train station, having itself become a contemporary art museum, presents another kinetic sculpture within the exhibition dedicated to Cory Arcangel: “Untitled Kinetic Sculpture #2”. It is majestic and almost as banal as it is intriguing. Banal because it is composed of two columns of shelves on rollers and intriguing because these literally dance, synchronised in their bending. It takes a bit of time to get used to the work. The time needed to convince oneself that it is not an hallucinatory vision but shelves very much like every day ones, except for the fact that they are not inert. Powered by electricity, they are animated by perpetual undulatory movements that sublimate them while conferring upon them their status as a work of art. Though made of metal, they seem as supple and graceful as dancers and almost fragile, but with a regularity that is entirely robotic.