The Man from the 9 Dimensions

The Man from the 9 Dimensions

Based on the latest scientific data and hypotheses, Takashi Shimizu, the pioneer of horror movies, visualizes the world as theoretical physicists see it in order to create a new kind of science movie. The world’s first 3D full-dome movie on the “Theory of Everything”; the ultimate goal of physics to describe all natural phenomena by a single, consistent theory. Physics is in crisis. Our understandings of the microscopic world of elementary particles and of the macroscopic world of the universe are in contradiction. Scientists are striving to resolve the contradictions and construct the Theory of Everything. Be ready to be surprised by the new world of vibrating strings and hidden dimensions predicted by the most promising hypothesis, the Superstring Theory.

Scientific Advisor: Hirosi Ooguri

Director: Takashi Shimizu

Rio Wolta and Piet Baumgartner

Bittersweet tea symphony
Sound installation with 200 kettles boiling, vibrating, steaming. People come and go whenever they like.

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.