ROSIE DANFORD PHILLIPS

Autumn Winter 2019
Rose Danford-Phillips admits it: as the daughter of gardeners, she draws her inspiration from nature. And when she evokes her love for lace, she speaks about a “delicate sensation of petals” … With her skill at vegetation metaphors, she explains that she transformed a magnificent piece of Sophie Hallette lace into a “rampant vine” for her graduate collection at the Royal College of Art. Either by combining it with a fringed silk to reinforce the idea of an uncontrollable, wild nature or by hand-embroidering it onto plastic to create a sense of nature recreated in a laboratory. “Lace tells a story” she says and hers transports us into a poetic, feminine and modern tale.

LETHA WILSON

Wall in Blue Ash Tree

“I think that nature as a subject is often seen as something outdated or cliché in contemporary art and especially in nature photos. But I think there is still a lot of scope to play and push the boundaries, “Letha Wilson said. She thus dust off the subject through installations, videos and photo-sculptures and breathe new life into the gallery.
Using photography as a material in its own right, she shakes up conventions and does not hesitate to manipulate her photographs and associate them with other elements such as wood, paint, light or more recently, concrete, giving them a new dimension. One way for her to suggest that the viewer question the desire to be elsewhere and the representation of nature. Letha plays on the fragile balance that exists between the beauty of her images and their sculptural strength and thus creates relationships between nature, objects, exhibition space and wild landscapes. »Géraldyne Masson.

Precht

Bert
“We are fully aware that architecture is this serious and profound craft with a long culture and tradition. You see that when we architects find reference for our projects in art, philosophy, literature or nature. For this project, we also looked at art to find reference. But not at Michaelangelo or Dali. Rather we looked at cartoon characters of Sesame Street or Minions. We took a playful look at this project and wanted to create a rather unique character than a conventional building. A quirky looking character that becomes part of the wildlife of a forest. I think this quirkiness can create feelings and emotions. And maybe these are attributes in architecture that are missing these days.”

Rosie Danford Phillips

Opulent Virulence
“My collection is inspired by my fascination with nature; an interpretation of the complexity and unrestrained beauty of nature, which I express through complex layering, colour and a maximalist aesthetic that takes joy in abundance and opulence. I create my own ecosystems of layered and built fabrics in knit, print and unconventional embroidery. My clothes are in a state of rewilding – I infect the silhouettes with rich colourful textiles, giving them life. I grow my embroideries over graphic and sculptural silhouettes to emphasise and contrast the organic and the built landscape.” Rosie Danford Phillips

Peter Lik

kanion antyotypy arizona
Peter Lik is a photographer from Australia, best known for his nature and panoramic landscape images.
This practice continued when he took road trips out of the city and into the wilds of Australia, often accompanied by his friend and fellow photographer Michael Plumridge. As a photographer, Lik is self-taught, learning mostly by trial and error.